Wednesday, 19 April 2017

Things in the library 21 April...

Things about fussy eating...
Fussy/picky eating – i.e. consistently avoiding certain foods – is common in childhood and can be worrisome for parents. Repeated exposure to various flavors as occurs in breastmilk and early exposure to complementary feeding may increase food acceptance and thereby decrease fussy eating. This study examines the associations between infant feeding and child fussy eating in 4779 participants of Generation R, a Dutch population-based cohort.  Results suggest that breastfeeding does not predict fussy eating. However, introducing vegetables into a child's diet before 5 months might be protective against fussy eating, although future research should account for parents' own fussy eating.

Things about growth & development...
This article "Postnatal growth in term infants born small for gestational age is associated with later neurocognitive and metabolic outcomes" systematically reviewed papers published in English between 1994 and October 2015 on how postnatal weight gain and growth affects neurodevelopment and metabolic outcomes in term-born small for gestational age (SGA) infants. Two randomised trials reported that enriched infant formulas that promoted early growth also increased fat mass, lean mass and blood pressure, but had no effect on early neurocognitive outcomes. Meanwhile, 31 observational studies reported consistent positive associations between postnatal weight gain and growth with neurocognitive outcomes, adiposity, insulin resistance and blood pressure. They concluded that few intervention studies exist, despite consistent positive associations between early growth and neurocognition in term-born SGA infants.

Things about social media...
A discussion paper entitled "Social Media Use and Children's Wellbeing" from University of Sheffield authors was shared on SSRN (SSRN is devoted to the rapid worldwide dissemination of research and is composed of a number of specialised research networks.) This research explores the effect of children's digital social networking on their subjective wellbeing. Using a large representative sample of 10-15 year olds over the period 2010 to 2014 from the UK Household Longitudinal Study, and estimating the effect of time spent chatting on social websites on a number of outcomes which reflect how these children feel about different aspects of their life, specifically: school work; appearance; family; friends; school attended; and life as a whole. Their results suggest that spending more time on social networks reduces the satisfaction that children feel with all aspects of their lives, except for their friendships; and that girls suffer more adverse effects than boys. As well as addressing policy makers' concerns about the effects of digital technology on children, this work also contributes to wider debates about the socioeconomic consequences of the internet and digital technologies more generally, a debate which to date has largely been based on evidence from outside of the UK.

Things about Case Reviews...
The National Guardian's Office (NGO) will launch a twelve month trial of its new case review process on 22 May. The case review will commend areas of good practice, where NHS staff have been supported to raise concerns. It will also provide where evidence of where inappropriate practice is found and recommendations to help foster a positive change in speaking up culture. After the twelve month trial period, the case review process will be reviewed and any necessary changes and improvements will be made. Information on how to submit a case for review will shortly be available on the National Guardian’s Office web pages. You can download a draft summary  of how the case review process will work or view the feedback received so far.

Bristol Safeguarding Children Board (BSCB) has published the report of the serious case review (SCR) into the death of a new mother and her four-day-old daughter. Key issues include: professionals lost focus on the unborn child, and appeared more focused on the needs of the mother who had mental health problems; professionals felt intimidated by an unpredictable and hostile service user, and became less confident in using their skills and expertise; the range of individual services working with pregnant women with mental ill-health made it difficult to coordinate multi-organisational working.

Things about adolescent health...
This study 'Educational Attainment at Age 10–11 Years Predicts Health Risk Behaviors and Injury Risk During Adolescence'  is based on life course theory, whereby low-educated individuals are exposed to cumulative disadvantage through socioeconomic adversity, chronic stress, and poor health lifestyles and environments, among other mechanisms. All those factors manifest over the long term and culminate in poorer health in late life. It was designed to contribute to this literature by examining the effect of educational attainment on adolescent health, using injury rates as a proxy for risk-taking behaviors. It concludes that "Interventions aimed at children with declining attainment in primary school could help to improve adolescent health."

Things about sleep...
The Sleep Copuncil's website has many interesting resources to help you get a better night's sleep. Including some 'nodcasts' for you to download they asked more than 2,000 people what sounds helped them to de-stress/get to sleep. Among the top answers were the sounds of birdsong, rain, thunder and lightning, waves and wind. So they have reproduced those sounds  for you to listen to whenever you need a soothing sound to help you off to sleep.

Something zingy...
Perhaps not the meal to eat just before bedtime but this Hot-smoked salmon salad with a chilli lemon dressing is lovely and fresh for spring after all the Easter chocolate, simnel cakes and hot-cross buns.







Thursday, 6 April 2017

Things in the library 7 April..

Things to read...
Our SCH Reading Group will be launching on Wed 3rd  May and the plan is to meet at 17:15 (5.15pm) on the first Wednesday of each month in the Illingworth Library. It will be an informal discussion of the books that we have read and if you are interested in coming along please email the library.

Things about medical training...
A new review from the GMC  'Adapting for the future' identifies five problems that create barriers to more flexible postgraduate UK medical training arrangements. These barriers result in training that is rigid, slow to adapt, and fixated with time and tick boxes.
They say"We will respond by taking specific actions, together with others, to realise our ambition for more transparency across specialties about outcomes. We want trainees to have clarity and confidence in what it will mean for them if they switch specialties. Equivalent training between related specialties will be recognised. This will improve efficiency by allowing doctors to transfer their skills more easily and to avoid repeating training. Patients and health services will benefit from having doctors who can care for patients with conditions that cross specialty and subspecialty boundaries." 


Things about child mental health...
Delivering mental health transformation for all children : Findings from engagement with the children and young people’s voluntary sector in Autumn 2016. this report has been published by the national Children's Bureau and  focuses on progress and challenges in improving children and young people’s mental health services in England, particularly for minority or vulnerable groups. It is based on the views of 49 professionals working with children and young people, primarily from the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector (VCSE).

Things for us to buy...
We will be sending off an order for new books soon so if you know of any resources that you think it would be useful for us to buy (books or e-books) then please contact us with your suggestions. If you are not sure what we already have access to then please check out our library catalogue on the internet. Don't forget there are also thousands of e-books that you can browse without charge for a few minutes and then request purchase if you think they would be a useful resource.

Things about preterm infants...
(c)https://www.massagemag.com/research-exclusive-massage-
improves-growth-quality-among-male-preterm-infants-12532/
A recent review article has looked at the evidence for the beneficial effects of massage on pre-term infants. The article reviews published randomized controlled trials on the effects of massage in preterm infants. Most studies evaluating the effect of massage in weight gain in premature infants suggest a positive effect on weight gain. Increase in vagal tone has been reported in infants who receive massage and has been suggested as a possible mechanism for improved weight gain. More studies are needed on the underlying mechanisms of the effects of massage therapy on weight gain in preterm infants. While some trials suggest improvements in developmental scores, decreased stress behavior, positive effects on immune system, improved pain tolerance and earlier discharge from the hospital, the number of such studies is small and further evidence is needed.

Things about Easter...
No blog next week as the library will be closed on Good Friday and Easter Monday and we will be closing at 5 pm the rest of that week.
If you don't like fruit cakes and so won't be making a  traditional Simnel cake then what about this Mary Berry alternative Cardamom and white chocolate sponge








Friday, 31 March 2017

Things in the library 31 March

Things about the internet...
The House of Lords Communications Committee has published a report looking at the issues and opportunities children face as they grow up with the internet. Recommendations to government include: establishing a Children’s Digital Champion to ensure coordinated and sustained action and to present robust advocacy on behalf of children to industry; minimum standards established for child-friendly design, content control filtering, privacy, data collection, terms and conditions of use; digital literacy should sit alongside reading, writing and arithmetic as the fourth pillar of a child’s education. Further information: Growing up with the internet

Things about South Yorkshire...
The Department for Education (DfE) has published an evaluation of the South Yorkshire empower and protect (SYEP) project, which aimed to provide young people experiencing sexual exploitation with ways to remain safely at home or in stable foster care locally. Findings include: some positive outcomes for a small number of young people; foster carers reported that training and support provided has made a difference to their ability to support challenging young people; evidence that key risk factors, including missing episodes, have been reduced and protective factors, including a positive relationship with at least one supportive adult and attending school or college, have been increased. Further information: South Yorkshire empower and protect child sexual exploitation innovation project: evaluation report 

Things about Sheffield...
Sheffield’s innovative approach to supporting children and young people’s emotional well-being and mental health known as ‘Sheffield Healthy Minds’ is to be rolled out to 40 additional schools from April 2017. This follows a successful pilot with 10 schools in Sheffield, which has been held up by NHS England as an example of good practice.The Sheffield Healthy Minds programme commissioned  by Sheffield Clinical Commissioning Group and Sheffield City Council and delivered by Sheffield Children’s NHS Foundation Trust’s Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS)  supports schools to develop a whole school approach to students emotional wellbeing –  through staff training, Healthy Minds surveys, developing PSHE materials, engaging Healthy Minds Champions and supporting staff in their understanding of good mental health and early help as well as  developing stronger links with CAMHS services.

Things about breastfeeding...
Almost three-quarters of women start breastfeeding when their child is born, but this drops to 44% within 6 to 8 weeks. Evidence shows the right support helps mums to breastfeed for longer. A new survey of 500 mothers of young children commissioned by PHE showed that more than half were concerned that breastfeeding could mean they wouldn’t be able to tell if their baby was getting too much or not enough milk. A similar proportion of mums surveyed thought that people might assume they need a special diet to breastfeed. Nearly 3 in 10 worried that breastfeeding could mean their baby might not be getting the right nutrients, indicating why mothers may stop breastfeeding at this early point. Start4Life, PHE’s marketing programme that helps parents-to-be and parents to adopt healthy behaviours, has launched a new interactive Breastfeeding Friend (BFF) ChatBot. The BFF is accessed through Facebook messenger and provides personal support for mothers at any time of the day or night to help make breastfeeding a better experience. The BFF will also dispel breastfeeding myths and help alleviate concerns mums have. The ChatBot works as a live chat tool which is able to respond to questions about breastfeeding posed by the user. To access the Breastfeeding BFF, simply open Facebook Messenger and search Start4Life BreastFeeding Friend or visit m.me/Start4LifeBreastFeedingFriend to get started.

Things to attend...
The next journal club will be on ​​Weds 5th April  8 -9 am in the Education and Skills Centre, F Floor, Stephenson Wing. Paper: Renal Scarring in the Randomized Intervention for Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux (RIVUR) Trial 

Things about children's safety...
The NSPCC report three recent commitments by the government which they believe will keep children safer.More details here.
- improving internet safety in the UK to ensure better protection for children online
- making Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) mandatory in all schools in England
- stopping plans that meant local authorities in England could gain exemption from children's social care law.

Things about sleep...
A survey by The Lullaby Trust shows more than half of parents still unsure how to sleep their baby safely A survey commissioned by charity The Lullaby Trust has found that over 55% of parents are unsure of the basic steps they can take to lower the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. The survey of 500 parents with children aged 0-2 years, found that while most are aware of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) there is confusion around one of the most fundamental steps to reduce the risk of SIDS: sleeping a baby on its back for every sleep.
The survey shows 38% of parents are unsure whether they can sleep a baby on their front and 55% are unsure whether to sleep a baby on their side. The survey results are a worrying indication that parents are still not equipped with the information they need to reduce the risk of SIDS. Evidence shows that babies who are slept on their back for every sleep are 6 times less likely to die from SIDS than those who sleep on their front or side.

Things about research...
Advancing child health research in the UK: the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health Infants’ Children's and Young People's Research Charter . This paper describes the development of the Research & Us Infants', Children's and Young People's Child Health Research Charter. It was developed with the engagement of children and young people through the RCPCH's & Us network, which is a large collaborative network enabling children, young people and parents and carers to have a voice in improving healthcare services and achieving better outcomes. The Charter was designed to support children, young people, their families and healthcare professionals in discussions about research issues.

Things to eat...
These recipes I spotted and they look like something I might try for Easter  - but I will practice first! I expect you can buy chocolate cups if you don't want to make them. Raspberry Chocolate cups and
Chocolate cups with mango.






Friday, 24 March 2017

Things in the library 24 March...


Things about mental health services...
The Education Policy Institute has published a new report, The performance of the NHS in England in transforming children’s mental health services.  The report analyses data from NHS England’s Mental Health Five Year Forward View Dashboard and examines progress made by the Government in improving children and young people’s mental health services (CAMHS).  It highlights that almost three quarters of CCGs failed to meet NHS England’s benchmark for improving services although there has been a slight improvement since quarter 1.

Things about Children's Social Care...
The All Party Parliamentary Group for Children (APPGC) published the findings of their latest Inquiry into children’s social care services in England in March 2017. The report, ‘No Good Options’, pulls together information obtained throughout the duration of the Inquiry which ran from February 2016 to January 2017.  As part of the Inquiry, the APPGC held 7 oral evidence sessions (including one private closed session) and received 62 written submissions from local authorities, academics, statutory bodies, local safeguarding children’s boards and the voluntary sector. This Inquiry brought together evidence about the current resourcing of children’s social services and changes in the nature and level of demand, to improve our understanding of the challenges facing under-performing children’s services, and how to address them.  ‘No Good Options’ has identified key areas in which improvement is essential if children’s services are to reach all children and young people in need of support.

Things about breast milk...
An interesting article published this week on "Stem-Like Cell Characteristics from Breast Milk of Mothers with Preterm Infants as Compared to Mothers with Term Infants" their finding were that " (1) stem cells are present in preterm breast milk; (2) differential expression of stem cell-specific markers can be detected in preterm and full-term breast milk samples; and (3) the percentage of cells expressing the various stem cell-specific markers differs when preterm and full-term breast milk samples are compared." Briere Carrie-Ellen,  Breastfeeding Medicine. March 2017, ahead of print. doi:10.1089/bfm.2017.0002.

Things for a smart phone...
Childline has launched a new app providing counselling to young people in the UK and Channel Islands through their smartphone. The app, named ‘For Me’ and invented by four teenagers, allows users to interact with all Childline’s online services including: 1-2-1 chat with a counsellor; the 'Ask Sam’ problem pages; and entrance to their private 'locker’, an area where they have their own daily mood tracker and can write down personal thoughts. Currently just available for i-phone..android version out soon.



Things to join...
A reminder that we are currently asking our SCH staff and library users if they would be interested if we started running a leisure reading book club. If you haven't already expressed your interest then please do so on this online form.


Things about lunches...

I thought this was a really interesting idea four university colleagues who get creative with their lunchboxes and share the cooking. It also reminded me about a favourite book of mine which is Salad Love by David Beg which has a different salad for every workday for a year. So this week I am picking one of his salads Chorizo, chervil and couscous


Friday, 17 March 2017

Things in the library 17 March...

Things about looked after children...
Coram Voice and Bristol University launched the findings of a new report Our Lives Our Care. The report is part of Coram Voice’s Bright Spots project which aims to improve young people’s care journeys by involving their experiences and opinions.83% of looked after children say that being in care has improved their lives, but girls report lower wellbeing than boys.




Things about the environment...
This new publication from WHO presents the continuing and emerging challenges to children’s environmental health. Inheriting a sustainable world: Atlas on children’s health and the environment  takes into account changes in the major environmental hazards to children’s health over the last 13 years, due to increasing urbanisation, industrialisation, globalisation and climate change, as well as efforts in the health sector to reduce children’s environmental exposures. It aligns with the Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health, launched in 2015, in stressing that every child deserves the opportunity to thrive, in safe and healthy settings.
Closely linked is another publication from WHO Don’t pollute my future! The impact of the environment on children’s health. It was estimated in 2012 that 26% of childhood deaths and 25% of the total disease burden in children under five could be prevented through the reduction of environmental risks such as air pollution, unsafe water, sanitation and inadequate hygiene or chemicals. Children are especially vulnerable to environmental threats due to their developing organs and immune systems, smaller bodies and airways. Proportionate to their size, children ingest more food, drink more water and breathe more air than adults. Additionally, certain modes of behaviour, such as putting hands and objects into the mouth and playing outdoors can increase children’s exposure to environmental contaminants.

Things about DNA (Did Not Attend)...
Nottingham City Safeguarding Children Board has produced a short video animation to encourage practitioners to identify children as ‘Was Not Brought’ as opposed to ‘Did Not Attend’ (DNA) when referring to them not being presented at medical appointments. The NSPCC thematic briefing on learning from case reviews for the health sector finds that the DNA category does not recognise the real issue which is children not being taken to appointments, a potential indicator of neglect.

New books...
Some new books have been put on the shelves this week including a new edition of '100 cases in paediatrics'  The new edition explores common paediatric scenarios that will be encountered by the medical student and junior doctor during practical training on the ward, in the emergency department, in outpatient clinics and in the community, and which are likely to feature in qualifying examinations. The book covers a comprehensive range of presentations from cough to constipation, organised by sub-speciality area for ease of reference. Comprehensive answers highlight key take home points from each case and provide practical advice on how to deal with the challenges that occur when practising paediatric medicine at all levels.

Things a bit changeable...
From eating my lunch in Weston Park on Wednesday (along with lots of other staff escaping for a few minutes) to being back in my winter coat today it's difficult to know whether to go light and spring like with the recipe or back to warm, comfortable food. Although forecast to get a bit warmer at the weekend it doesn't look like it will be sunny so lets have a soup. This Jamie Oliver sweet potato, coconut & cardamom soup sounds lovely.








Friday, 10 March 2017

Things in the library 10th March

Things about life, the universe and everything...
The  24 Hour Inspire event for 2017 will be taking place 30-31 March 2017 at University of Sheffield. A series of 30min talks throughout the night on a wide variety of topics details here. Everything from 'How will Brexit affect your breakfast' to 'A journey into biomechanics'. All proceeds to Teenage Cancer Trust & Western Park Charity.

Things in the news...
The Yorkshire Post talked about the work Dr Marta Cohen and colleagues are doing to develop  minimally invasive techniques for autopsies. The autopsy, which minimises the surgical intervention in youngsters’ bodies has been developed at Sheffield Children’s Hospital, where counsellors and charity backers believe it will make a huge difference at “the most horrific moment any parent could ever face”. Dr Cohen said it could be “the biggest step forward in pathology for a century”.

Things about anxiety...
Group Mindfulness Therapy (GMT) is a program tailored for adolescents that targets anxiety with mindfulness skills including present moment awareness, mindfulness in everyday life (breathing, eating, walking), body scan, loving-kindness, and self-acceptance. Youth with anxiety may benefit from mindfulness exercises precisely because they learn to redirect their mind, and presumably their attention, away from wandering in the direction of worry and negative self-appraisals and toward greater acceptance of internal states. This open trial "Innovations in practice: group mindfulness for adolescent anxiety – results of an open trial" assessed the feasibility and initial effectiveness of GMT in a school setting.

Things about SEND...
This Decision Making Toolkit is designed to support social workers, health practitioners, school and college staff, parent carers, families and anyone working directly with children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), to support young people to make their own decisions and to participate as fully as possible in decisions made on their behalf in line with the requirements of the Mental Capacity Act 2005.

Things about disparity...
A study by seven British universities and has revealed significant inequalities in child welfare across the UK, with children in the poorest areas at least 10 times more likely than those in the most affluent to become involved in the child protection system. The study is funded by the Nuffield Foundation. Researchers found ‘strong social gradients’ in the rates of intervention across the four countries, with each step increase in neighbourhood deprivation bringing a significant rise in the proportion of children either ‘looked after’ in care (LAC) or on a child protection plan (CPP). Academics from the universities of Coventry, Sheffield, Huddersfield, Cardiff, Edinburgh, Stirling and Queen’s University Belfast were funded by the Nuffield Foundation to investigate data on over 35,000 children who are either LAC or on CPPs – over 10% of all such cases open in March 2015, when the study began.


Things about mental health...
Five Year Forward View for Mental Health – one year on This report marks the anniversary of the publication of the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health. It highlights the progress made in the first year of the programme, and takes a look at the achievements that need to be build upon to deliver next year and beyond. Improvements in access to high quality services, choice of interventions, integrated physical and mental health care, prevention initiatives, funding and challenging stigma were people’s top priorities as to how the system needs to change by 2020.

Things about systematic reviews...
Do systematic reviews on pediatric topics need special methodological considerations?  This recent article discusses this topic as they believe available guidelines including PRISMA do not cover the complexity associated with the conduct and reporting of systematic reviews in the pediatric population; they require additional and modified standards for reporting items. Such guidance will facilitate the translation of knowledge from the literature to bedside care and policy, thereby enhancing delivery of care and improving child health outcomes. They propose to develop a consensus-based checklist of essential items which researchers should consider when they are planning (PRISMA-PC-Protocol for Children) or reporting (PRISMA-C-reporting for Children) a pediatric systematic review.

Things about rhubarb...
I spotted the first Yorkshire rhubarb in the shops yesterday and whilst very expensive at the moment it does mean some lovely eating coming up. The word "rhubarb" derives from the Latin expression rheum barbarum, the barbarian from the banks of the river Rha (Volga), but the large-leaved Siberian native was a welcome immigrant to the Yorkshire Dales. Local farmers  in the Yorkshire Rhubarb Triangle developed secret methods to produce the tender and sweet version of rhubarb that has won a global fan base. As well as all the lovely puddings and cakes why not try something more unusual like this Pork with black pudding & roasted rhubarb







Friday, 3 March 2017

Things in the library 3 March

Things to chat about, wind down and relax with...
Inspired by World Book Day this week we are thinking we might start a Leisure Reading Book Club to meet in the library. We need to gauge interest first though, so if you think this is something you would enjoy please fill in our online form.

Things about research with children...

The objective of this analysis was to examine ethical issues in research with children and adolescents from their perspective as participants, including: assent, parental consent, risk perception, impact of research participation, and incentives. This systematic review highlights the importance of including the voice of children and adolescents in the debate regarding the ethical conduct of research.



Things about ears...
A recent review article on 'Acute otitis media with spontaneous tympanic membrane perforation'. The principal aim of this review is to present the current knowledge regarding acute otitis media (AOM) with spontaneous tympanic membrane perforation (STMP) and to address the question of whether AOM with STMP is a disease with specific characteristics or a severe case of AOM.


Things about Autism...
A parent-focused therapy for young children with autism continues to have beneficial effects on symptoms and communication almost six years after the end of treatment. This UK randomised controlled trial investigated the effects of a one-year social communication therapy in 152 UK children aged two to four years with severe autism. The therapy, partly delivered by parents, aimed to help them adapt their style of interacting with their child.Children who received the intervention had less severe symptoms at the end of the initial one-year intervention period than those who received treatment as usual. When these children were followed up nearly six years later at age seven to 11 years, children who had received the intervention still had less severe symptoms than those who had received usual care. When all the data from both time points were combined, the intervention had a statistically significant overall beneficial effect.This therapy, which is less intensive than some existing approaches, may be an option for young children with autism, although the cost effectiveness is not known.

Things about food...
Food Insecurity (FI)  [the state of being without reliable access to a sufficient quantity of affordable, nutritious food.] occurs in 21% of families with children and adolescents in the United States, but the potential developmental and behavioral implications of this prevalent social determinant of health have not been comprehensively elucidated. This systematic review aims to examine the association between FI and childhood developmental and behavioral outcomes in western industrialized countries.

Things that are short ...
ScHARR (School of Health and Related Research) have a new programme of short courses available including these below click here for more information

Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis Short Course
Tuesday, 4th - Thursday, 6th April 2017
Instant Evidence Based Medicine: How to quickly synthesise research.
Tuesday, 9th May 2017
Rapid Review Methods
Thursday, 19th May 2017

Things about serious case reviews...
Learning from serious case reviews on harmful sexual behaviour.The NSPCC has published a summary of the risk factors and learning from serious case reviews involving harmful sexual behaviour (HSB). Learning identified includes: HSB should be recognised as a potential indicator that the child has experienced abuse; professionals should work together to identify the reasons behind a child’s behaviour and consider the appropriate safeguarding responses.

Things to discover...
Discovery Night  (Friday 10 March 2017 4pm-8pm) opens the University’s laboratories and lecture theatres to the public for an evening of science for the whole family. There’ll be talks, exciting demonstrations and hands on activities for visitors of all ages. Find out about everything from astronomy to zoology, from dentistry to zebrafish. Tour the facilities, put on a lab coat and have a go yourself. Everyone welcome and the event is free – no booking required.

Things with left-overs...
Having a roast chicken this weekend?  This recipe for Chicken Parmentier looks lovely to use up cooked chicken and mashed potatoes