Friday, 20 January 2017

Things in the library 20 Jan ...

New Things about TRIP....
One of Trip’s main aims is to help users find the best available evidence with the minimum of effort. The latest update has some innovative new features, all there to support your evidence search. Don't forget that for a second year you have access to PRO features by registering as NHS staff.

  • Answer Engine. They’ve been discussing this for nearly five years and seriously working on it for over twelve months. Obtain instant answers to some clinical questions, seamlessly integrated in to your search experience.
  • SmartSearch. An useful system to help speed up your search and to help users avoid missing important documents. They analyse the articles you click and use that to predict other articles that are highly relevant.
  • Search suggestions. Incorporated in to your results allowing you to easily produce a more focused search.
  • Broken links. Arguably a minor upgrade, but very important. Broken links can be a terrible user experience. Take out your frustrations by hitting the new ‘Broken link’ feature under each result.
Things about transition and epilepsy...
A recent article in Epilepsy & Behavior discusses 'The transition from pediatric to adult care for youth with epilepsy: Basic biological, sociological, and psychological issues'.  Below they summarise a few of the broad concerns that arise from this review.

  • Brain development – Impulsive pleasure seeking and risky behaviour may be the result of an imbalance between frontal and limbic maturation and should be anticipated.
  • Endocrinological development – Puberty has a major effect on development, personality, and behaviour.
  • Sexual development – Peer relationship problems may interfere with normal sexual development. Sexual debut is early in youth with epilepsy and long-term sexual experiences are often unsatisfactory.
  • Psychological development – Normal developmental stages in adolescence may be disrupted by epilepsy. While epilepsy may contribute to adjustment problems, some of these issues are related to normal developmental concerns. Family dysfunction has a strong effect on maturation of adolescents with epilepsy. Severe behaviour problems with intellectual disability and/or autistic spectrum disorder are not typically related to family dysfunction and have multiple etiologies.
  • Bone health – The degree of risk for and mechanisms of bone disorders in childhood-onset epilepsy are unclear. For those at increased risk, serum vitamin D and DXA screening may be useful along with supplemental vitamin D.
Things about 3D printing of drugs for children....
An article this week in AAPS PharmSciTech discusses the potential for using 3D printing for paediatric drugs the abstract is below. This article is part of a topical collection on the theme Pediatric Drug Development and Dosage Form Design.
The first medicine manufactured by three-dimensional (3D) printing was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The advantages of printing as a manufacturing route enabling more flexibility regarding the dose, and enlarging individual treatment options, have been demonstrated. There is a particular need for flexible drug delivery solutions when it comes to children. Printing as a new pharmaceutical manufacturing technology brings manufacturing closer to the patient and can easily be adjusted to the required dosing scheme, offering more flexibility for treatments. Printing of medicine may therefore become the manufacturing route of choice to provide tailored and potentially on-demand treatments for patients with individual needs. This paper intends to summarize and discuss the state of the art, the crucial aspects which should be taken into account, and the still-open questions, in order to make 3D printing a suitable manufacturing route for pediatric drugs.
Things about PKU...
A Key European guidelines for the diagnosis and management of patients with phenylketonuria was published in the Lancet recently. From the 70 recommendations formulated, in this Review they describe ten that they deem as having the highest priority.

An e-book for surgeons...
We have recently purchased an e-book copy of  the latest edition of Spitz Operative Pediatric Surgery for SCH staff. Follow the link and login with your free NHS Open Athens account.
Not a surgeon???.....then login to the e-book portal and search for what you are interested in. You can browse books free for 5 mins and if there is a resource which you think will be well used by your department ask us if we can purchase it.

Things with crunch...
As a quick easy and quite healthy dessert why not try these Honey nut crunch pears?  This recipe uses cornflakes but I expect other cereals would work well too!








Friday, 13 January 2017

Things in the library 13 Jan...




Things about the NHS...
The NHS indicators were reported in a briefing paper for House of Commons. The full report can be read here it covers areas such as: A&E, waiting lists, delayed transfers of care, staffing levels, and demand for hospital services.

Things about nicotine...
An article about the developmental toxicity of nicotine was published this month. The authors conclude "The evidence that nicotine adversely affects fetal and adolescent development is sufficient to warrant public health measures to protect pregnant women, children, and adolescents from nicotine exposure." Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews; Jan 2017; vol. 72 ; p. 176-189




Things about anaesthetics...
A recent review article has looked at intraperitoneal local anesthetic (IPLA) in paediatric surgery. They conclude "IPLA appears promising in pediatric surgery. The high absorptive capacity of the peritoneum and high peritoneal surface area to volume ratio in children presents a dose limitation. In comparison to adult surgery, IPLA has been understudied in pediatric surgery." European Journal of Pediatric Surgery; Dec 2016; vol. 26 (no. 6); p. 469-475





Things about priorities ...

The King's Fund have published a list of what they believe will be the priorities for the NHS this year. These are:
  • Supporting new care models centred on the needs of patients
  •  Strengthening and implementing sustainability and transformation plans 
  • Improving productivity and delivering better value 
  • Developing and strengthening leadership at all levels 
  • Securing adequate funding for health and social care 

Things about Quality Standards...
NICE has published two new Quality Standards.

Things about mental health...
The Government’s response to the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health has been published 


Things about online grooming...
Leicestershire Police has made its film to raise awareness of the dangers of online grooming publicly available. Based on the story of teenager Kayleigh Haywood, the film highlights how quickly and easily children can be groomed online without them or those around them knowing it is happening. 'Kayleigh’s love story' is available to watch online in eight different versions, including a signed version, and audio described version and versions translated into five languages. It has previously been shown to schoolchildren aged 11 and above in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland in controlled screenings by specially trained officers. More information here.

Things with a warm glow...
University of Sheffield restaurant (above the Student's Union) will be having a week of the Danish celebration of Hygge from Monday 23rd to Friday 27th January – their menus will be dedicated to this wellbeing celebration and they will play host to a Hygge After Work Celebration on Thursday 26th January.
Hygge (pronounced hue-gah) is a Danish word, which means the feeling or mood that comes from the genuine pleasure in making ordinary, everyday things more meaningful, beautiful or special. 
In essence, Hygge means creating a nice, warm atmosphere and enjoying the good things in life with good people around you. The warm glow of candlelight, friends and family, and of course eating and drinking. With the dark winter days and nights upon us, they will be taking the time to celebrate!
Make the most of Hygge Week, with warm candle light and nice wholesome food. Sooth your spirit and soul and relax, taking the time to focus on your wellbeing.


Things to eat...
Sarah made this curried chickpea salad recently and recommends it. Have a cosy time at home this weekend with these warming flavours and with some candles to make it more Hygge!

Friday, 6 January 2017

Things in the library 6 January...

Harry New Year to you all

Things about e-books...
We have bought the following e-books which you can access for free using your NHS Open Athens account - let us know if there are other resources you would like us to purchase and don't forget you can browse 1000s of books for free for 5 mins.

  • Training in Paediatrics
  • How to Read a Paper : The Basics of Evidence-Based Medicine
  • Nutrition and Bone Health
  • The Royal Marsden Manual of Clinical Nursing Procedures : Professional Edition
  • Lovell and Winter's Pediatric Orthopaedics
  • Hodson and Geddes' Cystic Fibrosis, Fourth Edition
  • Medical Statistics Made Easy
  • Neonatology at a Glance
  • Paediatrics at a Glance



Things pleasant...
A recent Health Technology Assessment was published by National Institute for Health Research  on 'Preventing and Lessening Exacerbations of Asthma in School-age children Associated with a New Term – a cluster randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation'. A medication reminder letter sent in July from general practitioners to parents/carers of school-age children with asthma did not reduce unscheduled contacts in September; but there appeared to be later effects and cost savings.


Things for physiotherapists...
A Cochrane review protocol has been published  on  'Physiotherapy interventions for functional bladder and bowel dysfunctions in neurologically normal and otherwise healthy children' The authors believe this will be the first systematic review that aims to assess the effects of physiotherapy or physiotherapy-related interventions in childhood BBD

Things about personalised perioperative pediatric pain management...
Recent article in Journal of Pediatric Nursing discussing this topic summarises: "Genomics has revolutionized pharmacological science and furthering the possibility of personal pain management based on individual's genotype. However, the usefulness of a personalized pain management is not exclusively based upon the genetic code but further aspects of nature and environment (Manworren et al., 2015). Thus, additional pediatric research requires further exploration on how to safely apply genetic revelations in perioperative pain to improve outcomes in pediatric pain management. Pediatric nurses must advocate for children during the peri-operative period. Pediatric nurses can assess for adequate pain control by using appropriate pain and weaning scales. Alerting the intraprofessional health care team to subtle changes in the child's response after administration of narcotics can be the clue that something more is occurring. In addition, pediatric nurses can minimize the effects of the environment on the hospitalized child in an effort to enhance future pain control.

Things about end of life care...
Published in December by NICE 'End of life care for infants, children and young people with life-limiting conditions: planning and management' This guideline covers the planning and management of end of life and palliative care in for infants, children and young people (aged 0–17 years) with life-limiting conditions. It aims to involve children, young people and their families in decisions about their care, and improve the support that is available to them throughout their lives.

Things about respiratory distress syndrome...
A recent article in Frontiers in Pediatrics discusses 'Viral Infection in the Development and Progression of Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome'. This review outlines what is known about ARDS secondary to viral infections including the epidemiology, the pathophysiology, and diagnosis. In addition, emerging treatment options to prevent infection, and to decrease disease burden are outlined. They focused on RSV and influenza A (H1N1) viral-induced ARDS, as these are the most common viruses leading to pediatric ARDS, and have specific prophylactic and definitive treatment options.

and...
The effect of inhaled nitric oxide in acute respiratory distress syndrome in children and adults: a Cochrane Systematic Review with trial sequential analysis was published in Anaesthesia this month.  Their primary objective in this systematic review was to examine the effects of inhaled nitric oxide administration on mortality in adults and children with acute respiratory distress syndrome. They concluded "there is insufficient evidence to support inhaled nitric oxide in any category of critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome despite a transient improvement in oxygenation, since mortality is not reduced and it may induce renal impairment."

and also...
A Cochrane Review published in December looked to answer the question "Does NIPPV [nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation] confer greater short-term and long-term benefits without harm to preterm infants with or at risk of respiratory distress compared with [nasal continuous positive airway pressure] NCPAP? They concluded that "early NIPPV does appear to be superior to NCPAP alone for decreasing respiratory failure and the need for intubation and endotracheal tube ventilation among preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Additional studies are needed to confirm these results and to assess the safety of NIPPV compared with NCPAP alone in a larger patient population."

Things that disappear quickly...
I don't normally have time (or inclination) for bread making but I do enjoy making soda bread as it is so quick and easy. I made this Seeded wholemeal soda bread this week...but think I will be making some more tomorrow as it has all gone already!

...and what to go with it?
Has to be a nice cosy soup I think and this Butternut squash soup with chilli & crème fraîche is a favourite. 
Tip:If you find peeling a butternut squash awkward (the skins are so hard) you can make it easier by putting the squash in the sink and pouring boiling water over it first or by microwaving it whole for 30 seconds.










Friday, 16 December 2016

Things in the library 16 December...

Things closing for Christmas...
We will be closed for stocktaking all day on Thursday 22 December and then closed between Christmas & New Year re-opening on Tuesday 3rd January.
We wish you all a Merry Christmas & Happy New Year.

Things about journal club...
The next meeting of Journal Club will be on Thursday 22nd December 8:00 to 9:00 - Paper: Evaluation of a New Strategy for​ Clean-Catch Urine in Infants (Pediatrics Volume 1 38, number 3 , September 2016)​. If you then need to work off the homemade muffins you could come and join the library staff for a really exciting party game ...stocktaking!

Things on Evidence Based Medicine...
School of Health and Related Research are advertising this course at the moment booking Deadline: Wednesday, 4th January 2017: Real World Evaluation: Ten key principles for Evaluating Complex Health and Social Interventions (2 day course) Thursday, 2nd - Friday, 3rd March 2017

Things about fractures...
This week, as part of the Child Health Emergency Medicine Social Media Campaign, Cochrane Child Health are highlighting a 2014 Cochrane summary on interventions for treating femoral shaft fractures in children and adolescents. This review was selected for the TREKK Evidence Repository on fractures.

Things about decisions...
This week was the pre-launch of a joint campaign by Health Education England (HEE) and CILIP, the (Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals),  highlighting the multiple beneficial outcomes when health service providers work closely with their library and knowledge services. Every day across the healthcare sector in England more than a million decisions are made that have a profound and lasting impact on people’s lives and which influence the quality of healthcare and the cost of services.
HEE and CILIP are campaigning for decisions in the healthcare sector to be fully evidence-based, calling on government and health service providers to employ and make use of the skills of librarians and knowledge specialists in meeting their obligations under The Health and Social Care Act 2012.
Let us know if help we have given you has had an impact on your work.

Things about improvement...
An evidence-based national framework to guide action on improvement skill-building, leadership development and talent management for people in NHS-funded roles has been published. Developing People- Improving Care. The vision is for team leaders at every level of the NHS to develop improvement and leadership capabilities among their staff and themselves. This will help protect and improve services for patients in the short term and for the next 20 years.

Things children are eating...
Health Survey for England 2015  was published this week this report examines the prevalence of overweight and obesity among children in England in 2015. It describes differences between groups of children, by age, sex and income. Parents’ and children’s perceptions of their weight are
compared with objective measures of body mass. Trends in childhood obesity over time are also discussed. There is comment and further information from Children's Food Trust

Things about infections...
Surgical site infections (SSI) surveillance: NHS hospitals in England was published this week. This annual report covers surgical site infection (SSI) data collected by NHS hospitals and independent sector NHS treatment centres.

Things to curl up with...
What better than a good book....don't forget we have a selection of leisure reading that anyone may borrow. Don't take a chance on Father Christmas not bringing you something to read this year ! Come up to the library and browse before we close for Christmas.








Friday, 9 December 2016

Things in the library 9 Dec...


Things going up...
Jeanette Hall (SCH staff) says: "My daughter Emily (14yrs), and her friend Abi (13yrs) are climbing every single climb (364 in total!) in the Climbing Works in aid of Sheffield Children's Hospital on 21st Dec! Last year they took 9 hours to do this!Please sponsor themYou can also support them by coming down to watch on the day, we will be there from 10am until night!"



Things about Gastrostomy Tubes...
This was a retrospective cohort study comparing complications and outcomes between different low-profile non-balloon GTs at a pediatric tertiary care center over 10 years.


Things about end of life care...

A new NICE guideline covers the planning and management of end of life and palliative care in for infants, children and young people (aged 0–17 years) with life-limiting conditions. It aims to involve children, young people and their families in decisions about their care, and improve the support that is available to them throughout their lives. The guideline does not cover children and young people without a life-limiting condition who die unexpectedly (for example, accidental death).

Things about migraine...

It is sometimes assumed that children and adolescents with migraine have a psychiatric or behavioral comorbidity, a belief that can be stigmatizing. This review examines the recent literature addressing this area to determine if pediatric and adolescent migraineurs are at increased risk for psychiatric comorbidity and to discuss management strategies.

Things about Journal Club...
​Thursday 15th December 8-9am, in the Education and Skills Centre, F Floor, Stephenson Wing.
Paper: Evidence of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Spread by Aerosol. Time to Revisit Infection Control Strategies?


Things closing...
Advance notice we will be closed for stocktaking on Thursday 22 December and we will be closed between Christmas and New Year - reopening on Tuesday 3 January.








Things in Weston Park museum...
The Museum across the road from the hospital will be transforming their Arctic World gallery into Santa’s North Pole ho-ho-home and he’ll be there in person with a warm welcome and quality presents. Open weekends, 3–18 Dec: Sat 10am–5pm Sun 11am–4pm Also open Mon 19 - Fri 23 Dec, 10am–5pm Sat 24 Dec, 10am–4pm. Santa’s appearance times may vary (even Santa needs to have lunch!) Please check times on arrival.

Things to sustain you...
I expect you all have a busy weekend ahead ( when my list of things I have to do got to 20 I stopped adding anymore) so why not try this healthy but comforting dish of Pearl barley, bacon & leek casserole that takes little preparation time.








Friday, 2 December 2016

Things in the library 2 Dec

Things sparkly...
Us...we have put our Christmas decorations up early this year as once we get into preparing for our annual stock-take (library closed Thursday 22 Dec) we forget about them until the last minute and then don't seem to have them up for long. Come and see how we look and take out some festive leisure reading for your Christmas break (if you get one!).
Remember we are closed between Christmas & New Year so if you need any library services before we go let us know as soon as possible please. Books that are 3-week loans are now being stamped for January.



Things about doctors & managers...
The Nuffield Trust have published a narrative literature review on  this week. This  looks at empirical studies on perceptions of doctor–manager relationships at medical director and clinical director level in the UK published since a 2002 survey on this subject by the same authors. This literature review accompanies a research report on the findings from a 2015 survey of doctor– manager relationships at board and middle-management levels of NHS acute trusts, which seeks to understand their views on the current state of the relationship in the UK, the pressures it is coming under, how it has changed, and the outlook for the future.

Things glowing...
I heard an interesting item on 'Inside Science' on BBC Radio 4 yesterday about glowing dressings that detect infection. These have been developed at University of Bath and have now started clinical trials. The trial, at Southmead Hospital Bristol, Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital and Queen Victoria Hospital East Grinstead will see swabs and used dressings taken from hundreds of patients to be used in laboratory tests at the University of Bath. These double-blind tests will establish statistically how sensitive the bandages are to infections, and how specifically they react to infections they are designed to detect. The samples will also undergo tests by scientists at the University of Brighton seeking genomic data from infection-causing bacteria which will help improve the bandages’ performance further.

Things about disability services...
The report 'Disability Matters in Britain 2016: Enablers and challenges to inclusion for disabledchildren, young people and their families' has been published. The report pulls together the views and experiences of disabled children, young people and their parents or carers with the aim of raising awareness of good practice being adopted already, encouraging others to follow their lead and to help ensure that disabled people of all ages are valued as equals in our communities. The report reflects the views of 10 young people, 123 parent carers of disabled children and adults and 128 professionals and volunteers who responded to the Disability Matters ‘call for evidence’ earlier this year. Key findings include:

  • Out of 72 examples from 123 parent carers, 30 parent carers experienced negative or unhelpful attitudes from others including other parents
  • 22 parent carers said they found it difficult to access healthcare services 
  • 20 parent carers reported trouble in finding opportunities for their child or young person so socialise with others
  • 19 parent carers said their child hadn’t accessed any social activities such as cinema, bowling and youth clubs in the past 12 months due to poor attitudes, inexperienced staff or inaccessible buildings and services
  • 40% of 96 respondents in the health sector felt their organisation was average or below average at communicating with disabled children and young people


Things Welsh and Christmassy...
A festive fairytale treat for all the family, A Child’s Christmas in Wales chronicles Dylan Thomas's own childhood memories and remains one of his most popular and loved works. In this wonderful adaptation for strings, step into December days ‘as white as Lapland’, where mischief is easily found, snowballs are hurled, and the curious grownups are shrewdly observed. University of Sheffield 18th December Evening & Matinee performances. Music: Ligeti Quartet Narration: Matthew Bulgo

Things achieved...

We haven't heard much from Sarah..she was last heard of heading for the Galapagos Islands. However here is her certificate of achievement.  At least she has stocktaking to look forward to on her return!

(c) http://laylita.com/
Not sure what she has been eating on her travels but as it's chilly here perhaps we can try one of these Ecuadorian soups...though not sure Tesco stocks cow's feet so might give that one a miss!

Friday, 25 November 2016

Things in the library 25th November

Things about epilepsy...
Public Health England has published Epidemiological assessment on proposed change to England’s children’s epilepsy surgery service specification. This assessment provides independent epidemiological evidence on how the children’s epilepsy surgery service specification (CESS) may be affected if the proposed changes to the current service specification are implemented.
The proposed changes are:

  • to expand the list of operations to be undertaken at designated CESS centres 
  • to change the current service specification so that children of all ages needing epilepsy surgery have their operations at one of the four designated CESS centres.
Things about antibiotics...
Public Health England has published English surveillance programme for antimicrobial utilisation and resistance (ESPAUR) report 2016. The ESPAUR report includes national data on antibiotic prescribing and resistance, and hospital antimicrobial stewardship implementation. It forms a standard against which antimicrobial use and antimicrobial resistance can be compared in successive years and a resource for commissioning and implementing antimicrobial stewardship policies in England.

Things about ...
Recent cohort studies found that 'Implementing evidence-based practices improves neonatal outcomes' and that 'Morphine exposure in preterm infants correlates with impaired cerebellar growth and poorer neurodevelopmental outcome'.  The library has a number of services that can help you find recent evidence based information - ask us if you need help, or checkout this page on our website.

Things about kidney injury...
A recent study discussed in New England Journal of Medicine involved 4683 patients 3 months to 25 years of age who had been admitted to pediatric intensive care units (ICUs) and were expected to require a stay of 48 hours or longer. The study indicates that acute injury is not only common among critically ill children and young adults, but is associated with adverse outcomes, implying that we should look more carefully for markers of acute kidney injury. Given the link between acute kidney injury and subsequent chronic kidney disease, it is possible that identifying and treating acute kidney injury promptly might reduce the prevalence of chronic kidney disease, now estimated as roughly 1 in 8 adults in the United States

Things about our travelling librarian...
The latest news we have from Sarah is that she is washing her socks...oh ... and she has managed to climb to the top of Cayambe the third highest mountain in Ecuador. Its south slope is the highest point in the world crossed by the Equator and the only point on the Equator with snow cover (according to Wikipedia).



Things crunchy...
I have had builders in this week so have limited access to my cupboards and a nice layer of black plaster dust settling out over everything. This recipe for 'Lemon & black pepper crusted salmon' looks quick, easy and tasty and hopefully the black pepper will disguise an unintentional extra crunch!