Friday, 24 March 2017

Things in the library 24 March...


Things about mental health services...
The Education Policy Institute has published a new report, The performance of the NHS in England in transforming children’s mental health services.  The report analyses data from NHS England’s Mental Health Five Year Forward View Dashboard and examines progress made by the Government in improving children and young people’s mental health services (CAMHS).  It highlights that almost three quarters of CCGs failed to meet NHS England’s benchmark for improving services although there has been a slight improvement since quarter 1.

Things about Children's Social Care...
The All Party Parliamentary Group for Children (APPGC) published the findings of their latest Inquiry into children’s social care services in England in March 2017. The report, ‘No Good Options’, pulls together information obtained throughout the duration of the Inquiry which ran from February 2016 to January 2017.  As part of the Inquiry, the APPGC held 7 oral evidence sessions (including one private closed session) and received 62 written submissions from local authorities, academics, statutory bodies, local safeguarding children’s boards and the voluntary sector. This Inquiry brought together evidence about the current resourcing of children’s social services and changes in the nature and level of demand, to improve our understanding of the challenges facing under-performing children’s services, and how to address them.  ‘No Good Options’ has identified key areas in which improvement is essential if children’s services are to reach all children and young people in need of support.

Things about breast milk...
An interesting article published this week on "Stem-Like Cell Characteristics from Breast Milk of Mothers with Preterm Infants as Compared to Mothers with Term Infants" their finding were that " (1) stem cells are present in preterm breast milk; (2) differential expression of stem cell-specific markers can be detected in preterm and full-term breast milk samples; and (3) the percentage of cells expressing the various stem cell-specific markers differs when preterm and full-term breast milk samples are compared." Briere Carrie-Ellen,  Breastfeeding Medicine. March 2017, ahead of print. doi:10.1089/bfm.2017.0002.

Things for a smart phone...
Childline has launched a new app providing counselling to young people in the UK and Channel Islands through their smartphone. The app, named ‘For Me’ and invented by four teenagers, allows users to interact with all Childline’s online services including: 1-2-1 chat with a counsellor; the 'Ask Sam’ problem pages; and entrance to their private 'locker’, an area where they have their own daily mood tracker and can write down personal thoughts. Currently just available for i-phone..android version out soon.



Things to join...
A reminder that we are currently asking our SCH staff and library users if they would be interested if we started running a leisure reading book club. If you haven't already expressed your interest then please do so on this online form.


Things about lunches...

I thought this was a really interesting idea four university colleagues who get creative with their lunchboxes and share the cooking. It also reminded me about a favourite book of mine which is Salad Love by David Beg which has a different salad for every workday for a year. So this week I am picking one of his salads Chorizo, chervil and couscous


Friday, 17 March 2017

Things in the library 17 March...

Things about looked after children...
Coram Voice and Bristol University launched the findings of a new report Our Lives Our Care. The report is part of Coram Voice’s Bright Spots project which aims to improve young people’s care journeys by involving their experiences and opinions.83% of looked after children say that being in care has improved their lives, but girls report lower wellbeing than boys.




Things about the environment...
This new publication from WHO presents the continuing and emerging challenges to children’s environmental health. Inheriting a sustainable world: Atlas on children’s health and the environment  takes into account changes in the major environmental hazards to children’s health over the last 13 years, due to increasing urbanisation, industrialisation, globalisation and climate change, as well as efforts in the health sector to reduce children’s environmental exposures. It aligns with the Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health, launched in 2015, in stressing that every child deserves the opportunity to thrive, in safe and healthy settings.
Closely linked is another publication from WHO Don’t pollute my future! The impact of the environment on children’s health. It was estimated in 2012 that 26% of childhood deaths and 25% of the total disease burden in children under five could be prevented through the reduction of environmental risks such as air pollution, unsafe water, sanitation and inadequate hygiene or chemicals. Children are especially vulnerable to environmental threats due to their developing organs and immune systems, smaller bodies and airways. Proportionate to their size, children ingest more food, drink more water and breathe more air than adults. Additionally, certain modes of behaviour, such as putting hands and objects into the mouth and playing outdoors can increase children’s exposure to environmental contaminants.

Things about DNA (Did Not Attend)...
Nottingham City Safeguarding Children Board has produced a short video animation to encourage practitioners to identify children as ‘Was Not Brought’ as opposed to ‘Did Not Attend’ (DNA) when referring to them not being presented at medical appointments. The NSPCC thematic briefing on learning from case reviews for the health sector finds that the DNA category does not recognise the real issue which is children not being taken to appointments, a potential indicator of neglect.

New books...
Some new books have been put on the shelves this week including a new edition of '100 cases in paediatrics'  The new edition explores common paediatric scenarios that will be encountered by the medical student and junior doctor during practical training on the ward, in the emergency department, in outpatient clinics and in the community, and which are likely to feature in qualifying examinations. The book covers a comprehensive range of presentations from cough to constipation, organised by sub-speciality area for ease of reference. Comprehensive answers highlight key take home points from each case and provide practical advice on how to deal with the challenges that occur when practising paediatric medicine at all levels.

Things a bit changeable...
From eating my lunch in Weston Park on Wednesday (along with lots of other staff escaping for a few minutes) to being back in my winter coat today it's difficult to know whether to go light and spring like with the recipe or back to warm, comfortable food. Although forecast to get a bit warmer at the weekend it doesn't look like it will be sunny so lets have a soup. This Jamie Oliver sweet potato, coconut & cardamom soup sounds lovely.








Friday, 10 March 2017

Things in the library 10th March

Things about life, the universe and everything...
The  24 Hour Inspire event for 2017 will be taking place 30-31 March 2017 at University of Sheffield. A series of 30min talks throughout the night on a wide variety of topics details here. Everything from 'How will Brexit affect your breakfast' to 'A journey into biomechanics'. All proceeds to Teenage Cancer Trust & Western Park Charity.

Things in the news...
The Yorkshire Post talked about the work Dr Marta Cohen and colleagues are doing to develop  minimally invasive techniques for autopsies. The autopsy, which minimises the surgical intervention in youngsters’ bodies has been developed at Sheffield Children’s Hospital, where counsellors and charity backers believe it will make a huge difference at “the most horrific moment any parent could ever face”. Dr Cohen said it could be “the biggest step forward in pathology for a century”.

Things about anxiety...
Group Mindfulness Therapy (GMT) is a program tailored for adolescents that targets anxiety with mindfulness skills including present moment awareness, mindfulness in everyday life (breathing, eating, walking), body scan, loving-kindness, and self-acceptance. Youth with anxiety may benefit from mindfulness exercises precisely because they learn to redirect their mind, and presumably their attention, away from wandering in the direction of worry and negative self-appraisals and toward greater acceptance of internal states. This open trial "Innovations in practice: group mindfulness for adolescent anxiety – results of an open trial" assessed the feasibility and initial effectiveness of GMT in a school setting.

Things about SEND...
This Decision Making Toolkit is designed to support social workers, health practitioners, school and college staff, parent carers, families and anyone working directly with children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), to support young people to make their own decisions and to participate as fully as possible in decisions made on their behalf in line with the requirements of the Mental Capacity Act 2005.

Things about disparity...
A study by seven British universities and has revealed significant inequalities in child welfare across the UK, with children in the poorest areas at least 10 times more likely than those in the most affluent to become involved in the child protection system. The study is funded by the Nuffield Foundation. Researchers found ‘strong social gradients’ in the rates of intervention across the four countries, with each step increase in neighbourhood deprivation bringing a significant rise in the proportion of children either ‘looked after’ in care (LAC) or on a child protection plan (CPP). Academics from the universities of Coventry, Sheffield, Huddersfield, Cardiff, Edinburgh, Stirling and Queen’s University Belfast were funded by the Nuffield Foundation to investigate data on over 35,000 children who are either LAC or on CPPs – over 10% of all such cases open in March 2015, when the study began.


Things about mental health...
Five Year Forward View for Mental Health – one year on This report marks the anniversary of the publication of the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health. It highlights the progress made in the first year of the programme, and takes a look at the achievements that need to be build upon to deliver next year and beyond. Improvements in access to high quality services, choice of interventions, integrated physical and mental health care, prevention initiatives, funding and challenging stigma were people’s top priorities as to how the system needs to change by 2020.

Things about systematic reviews...
Do systematic reviews on pediatric topics need special methodological considerations?  This recent article discusses this topic as they believe available guidelines including PRISMA do not cover the complexity associated with the conduct and reporting of systematic reviews in the pediatric population; they require additional and modified standards for reporting items. Such guidance will facilitate the translation of knowledge from the literature to bedside care and policy, thereby enhancing delivery of care and improving child health outcomes. They propose to develop a consensus-based checklist of essential items which researchers should consider when they are planning (PRISMA-PC-Protocol for Children) or reporting (PRISMA-C-reporting for Children) a pediatric systematic review.

Things about rhubarb...
I spotted the first Yorkshire rhubarb in the shops yesterday and whilst very expensive at the moment it does mean some lovely eating coming up. The word "rhubarb" derives from the Latin expression rheum barbarum, the barbarian from the banks of the river Rha (Volga), but the large-leaved Siberian native was a welcome immigrant to the Yorkshire Dales. Local farmers  in the Yorkshire Rhubarb Triangle developed secret methods to produce the tender and sweet version of rhubarb that has won a global fan base. As well as all the lovely puddings and cakes why not try something more unusual like this Pork with black pudding & roasted rhubarb







Friday, 3 March 2017

Things in the library 3 March

Things to chat about, wind down and relax with...
Inspired by World Book Day this week we are thinking we might start a Leisure Reading Book Club to meet in the library. We need to gauge interest first though, so if you think this is something you would enjoy please fill in our online form.

Things about research with children...

The objective of this analysis was to examine ethical issues in research with children and adolescents from their perspective as participants, including: assent, parental consent, risk perception, impact of research participation, and incentives. This systematic review highlights the importance of including the voice of children and adolescents in the debate regarding the ethical conduct of research.



Things about ears...
A recent review article on 'Acute otitis media with spontaneous tympanic membrane perforation'. The principal aim of this review is to present the current knowledge regarding acute otitis media (AOM) with spontaneous tympanic membrane perforation (STMP) and to address the question of whether AOM with STMP is a disease with specific characteristics or a severe case of AOM.


Things about Autism...
A parent-focused therapy for young children with autism continues to have beneficial effects on symptoms and communication almost six years after the end of treatment. This UK randomised controlled trial investigated the effects of a one-year social communication therapy in 152 UK children aged two to four years with severe autism. The therapy, partly delivered by parents, aimed to help them adapt their style of interacting with their child.Children who received the intervention had less severe symptoms at the end of the initial one-year intervention period than those who received treatment as usual. When these children were followed up nearly six years later at age seven to 11 years, children who had received the intervention still had less severe symptoms than those who had received usual care. When all the data from both time points were combined, the intervention had a statistically significant overall beneficial effect.This therapy, which is less intensive than some existing approaches, may be an option for young children with autism, although the cost effectiveness is not known.

Things about food...
Food Insecurity (FI)  [the state of being without reliable access to a sufficient quantity of affordable, nutritious food.] occurs in 21% of families with children and adolescents in the United States, but the potential developmental and behavioral implications of this prevalent social determinant of health have not been comprehensively elucidated. This systematic review aims to examine the association between FI and childhood developmental and behavioral outcomes in western industrialized countries.

Things that are short ...
ScHARR (School of Health and Related Research) have a new programme of short courses available including these below click here for more information

Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis Short Course
Tuesday, 4th - Thursday, 6th April 2017
Instant Evidence Based Medicine: How to quickly synthesise research.
Tuesday, 9th May 2017
Rapid Review Methods
Thursday, 19th May 2017

Things about serious case reviews...
Learning from serious case reviews on harmful sexual behaviour.The NSPCC has published a summary of the risk factors and learning from serious case reviews involving harmful sexual behaviour (HSB). Learning identified includes: HSB should be recognised as a potential indicator that the child has experienced abuse; professionals should work together to identify the reasons behind a child’s behaviour and consider the appropriate safeguarding responses.

Things to discover...
Discovery Night  (Friday 10 March 2017 4pm-8pm) opens the University’s laboratories and lecture theatres to the public for an evening of science for the whole family. There’ll be talks, exciting demonstrations and hands on activities for visitors of all ages. Find out about everything from astronomy to zoology, from dentistry to zebrafish. Tour the facilities, put on a lab coat and have a go yourself. Everyone welcome and the event is free – no booking required.

Things with left-overs...
Having a roast chicken this weekend?  This recipe for Chicken Parmentier looks lovely to use up cooked chicken and mashed potatoes











Friday, 24 February 2017

Things in the library 24 Feb...

Things for sale...
We have a new selection of books we are selling (old editions) now available in the library. Please email for a copy of the list ...but first come,first served and we can't keep things for you unless you are registered with the library.



Things about children with complex needs...
The Council for Disabled Children and The True Colours Trust have published Understanding the needs of disabled children with complex needs or life-limiting conditions: what we can learn from national data? This paper shares the findings of a data analysis carried out between August and October 2016. The main aim of the project was to explore what national data reported by health, education and social services show about disabled children and young people with complex needs or life-limiting conditions. The figures estimate that numbers have increased dramatically by over 50% since 2004, from 49,300 to 73,000 children and young people.

Things to comment on...
NICE is producing new guidelines to help people who work with children spot and stop abuse or neglect. It outlines how social workers, teachers and police officers, along with others working outside healthcare, can spot the signs of abuse or neglect and how they should act faced with a range of differing circumstances.The guidelines includes physical, mental and sexual abuse as well as newly recognised forms of abuse such as female genital mutilation (FGM), sexual exploitation, child trafficking and forced marriage.It outlines soft signs that in themselves do not indicate abuse but warrant further consideration and harder warning signs that professionals should investigate. The draft is available for public comment in a consultation.

Things about hygiene...
NICE – the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence – has published final guidance recommending all children and young people, from pre-school to university age, be taught the importance of hand washing and managing some common infections themselves. These recommendations aim to educate the general public in how they can contribute in the battle against antimicrobial resistance.




Things that are smart...
Asthma UK recently published a report 'Smart asthma: Real-world implementation of connected devices in the UK to reduce asthma attacks' The report sets out the opportunities and possible pitfalls as we digitise asthma. They have consulted industry, expert clinicians, eminent academics and policy specialists in the course of developing this report. They state that "to make new technology stick it must help healthcare system efficiency and allow providers to make a fair profit. However, our overriding and unapologetic duty is driving improvement for the 5.4 million people in the UK with asthma, and the families who have lost a loved one as a result of a failure in asthma care. It is for these people’s sake that the recommendations in this report should be seriously debated and considered, and the future implementation of digital asthma care taken up at the highest levels of the NHS."

Things about the long-term future of NHS...
The Centre for Policy Studies issued a report this week authored by Maurice Saatchi entitled 'An NHS Royal Commission From fighting fires to lasting settlement'. They conclude:
"Whatever the view, however, a Royal Commission on the long-term future of the NHS would offer signifi cant benefits, not least because of the huge looming challenges, such as the ageing population, the increasing prevalence of long-term conditions and the inflationary pressures of medical innovation. Only a Royal Commission can secure the bipartisan support needed to establish the lasting reforms required to ensure the world-class 21st Century health system that we all want to see."

Things to flip...
Yes...pancake day or 'Shrove Tuesday' is next week on Feb 28th. Christians traditionally used up food that couldn't be eaten during Lent, which was a time for fasting and penance, by making pancakes. If you want an easy recipe to follow here is one from Mary Berry. I should point out one error though as the article includes the phrase "any uneaten pancakes " ...not something I have personally ever experienced in our house!

Things artistic...
In some areas of the world this weekend will also see carnival parades and celebrations which, when we lived in the Netherlands, were a great fun time indicating that spring was on its way. This painting 'The Fight Between Carnival and Lent'  by Pieter Bruegel the Elder (1559) depicts the contrast between two sides of contemporary life, as can be seen by the appearance of the inn on the left side - for enjoyment, and the church on the right side - for religious observance. The busy scene depicts well-behaved children near the church and a beer drinking scene near the inn. At the centre is a well, showing the coming together of different parts of the community, and other scenes show a fish stall and two competing floats.
The picture is full of symbolism (the meaning of some of which is now conjecture). I am always fascinated to look at the details on these paintings as a depiction of everyday life from over 450 years ago.





Friday, 17 February 2017

Things in the library 17 Feb...

Things all hearts ..but no flowers (sob!)..
We had heart shaped biscuits, decorations and posters to launch our 'Book a Librarian ' service on Valentine's day. We had a great response and sessions have already been booked and delivered. It's not too late for you to ask us for help as this is an ongoing service. You can find out more on this page of our website or by clicking on the button on our catalogue to the right of the search box.
Remember a Librarian is for life not just for Valentine's Day!

Things about exercise...
"Shared familial factors, including genetics, are likely to be a significant contributor to the response of body composition and cardiorespiratory fitness following Physical Activity (PA). Genetic factors may explain individual variation in the response to PA."


Things for teddies...

Do you have a tummy ache...has all the stuffing been knocked out of you? Then bring your owners with you to Teddy Bear Hospital where bears (or other stuffed toys!) will have the opportunity for a one to one consultation with a teddy bear doctor. Activity stations include an "MRI scan", a look at an x-ray, having teddy bandaged and getting advice on how to stay healthy. Teddy bear dentists will also be on hand for top tips on dental health. Children and teddies are asked to please bring an adult with them!
Teddy Bear Hospital is a Sheffield Students' Union Society which aims to reduce the anxiety that children can experience when visiting the doctor or dentist, as well as promoting child health. This activity forms part of the Sheffield Volunteering programme. 10am - 16.30pm, Saturday 18 February 
Free, no booking required Weston Park Museum

Things about drooling...
A NICE evidence summary was published this week on Severe sialorrhoea (drooling) in children and young people with chronic neurological disorders: oral glycopyrronium bromide. This new medicine. Glycopyrronium bromide (Sialanar) is an antimuscarinic (anticholinergic) medicine licensed in September 2016 for the symptomatic treatment of severe sialorrhoea (chronic pathological drooling) in children and adolescents aged 3 years and older with chronic neurological disorders. Sialanar is licensed for short-term intermittent use and is only licensed in children. There is limited clinical trial evidence on the use of glycopyrronium in adults with sialorrhoea. Sialanar 320 micrograms/ml oral solution is the first formulation of glycopyrronium bromide licensed for this indication in the UK

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/its-just-like-
the-blitz-the-hurricane-that-hit-sheffield-in-1962-lk9ht5sg0
Things a bit blowy...
You might be interested to know that this week was the 55 years since the Sheffield 'Hurricane' The storm got 'trapped' between Sheffield's hills and caused devastation across the city. I remember being carried downstairs in the middle of the night and my father wearing a large saucepan on his head when he ventured outside to protect himself from flying slates and debris!

Things about eyes...

The Royal College of Ophthalmologists have commissioned The Way Forward to identify current methods of working and schemes devised by ophthalmology departments in the UK to help meet the increasing demand in ophthalmic services. The information aims to offer a helpful resource for ophthalmologists who are seeking to develop their services to meet capacity needs.The findings are based on more than 200 structured interviews with the ophthalmology clinical leads in all departments, in the four home nations, to identify the real life solutions being used to address the increasing demand.The research covers each of the particularly high volume areas in ophthalmic care with both a short summary document and a more detailed report.

Things about safeguarding...
NSPCC's How safe are our children? conference 2017 will be on Wed 21 June - Thurs 22 June 2017 at QEII Centre, Broad Sanctuary, Westminster, London, SW1P 3EE. Early bird and flexible ticket options available. Provides child protection professionals with the opportunity to debate, question and share insights about the latest strategies, policies and programmes to prevent child abuse and protect children. Over the course of the 2 days you'll hear from sector leaders as they share their innovations and solutions to help better protect children. You'll also hear from leading politicians as well as young people themselves.

Things about biscuits...
If you fancy making some yourself they are really easy follow this basic mixture and check out the guide for more ideas. The library staff are always available for checking the quality!





Friday, 10 February 2017

Things in the library 10 Feb...

Things we would like you to do... 

Make a date "Book a Librarian" Launches 14th February 2017

  • Arrange a free 1:1 or group session with a library professional - at your desk or ours.
  • Let us help you get the information you want when you need it. Our “Book a librarian” service enables you to reserve a session with a member of staff. Use our expertise to help you.
  • Do you need help finding evidence for patient care, journal articles, managing references, help with critical appraisal, using the library catalogue, organising your email, using Microsoft Office or managing your email, files & folders - we can help.
  • Pick up a form in the library or use the online version on the  library website.
Things happening next week...
Journal Club - Weds 15 February
​ 5.30 pm to 6.30 pm​ in 
Education and Skills Centre, F Floor, Grey Lifts. 
Paper: Pain Management in Patients With Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Undergoing Posterior Spinal Fusion. Email the library if you would like a copy of the paper

Come and see what all the fuss is about, eat muffins, drink coffee and learn something along the way!


A million useful things...
Health Education England and the Chartered Institute of Library & Information Professionals have launched a joint campaign for decisions in the healthcare sector to be fully evidence-based.  Every day more than a million decisions are made that have a profound and lasting impact on people's lives and which influence the quality of healthcare and the cost of services.  The#milliondecisions campaign calls for everyone involved in policy making and care delivery to use the skills of librarians and knowledge specialists in meeting their obligations under the Health and Social Care Act 2012.

Things published about SEND...
The Royal College of Speech & Language Therapists has published a new report regarding the special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) reforms in England. The report outlines the findings of a SEND survey, commissioned by the RCSLT, regarding members’ experiences of the SEND reforms, associated successes, challenges and areas for improvement.
The report highlights mixed progress in implementation and worrying trends. RCSLT members have said that:

- children without EHC plans are not getting the support that they need, and there has been a refocus of resources to support children with EHC plans, which has often been to the detriment of children without EHC plans.

- joint commissioning arrangements are patchy, and in some cases speech and language therapy services are not being commissioned for children and young people aged 0-2 and 18-25.

- engagement with the EHC planning process, including attending planning meetings, continues to be a challenge.

Encouragingly, the survey has also highlighted areas of positive practice that can be built upon including the involvement of parent and carers in decision-making and partnership working.  Over the coming months the RCSLT will be taking forward policy recommendations from the report to help improve support for children and young people with speech, language and communication needs (SLCN).
Read an executive summary of the report.


Things published about fathers...
The Centre for Mental Health has published Fatherhood: the impact of fathers on children’s mental health.  This briefing highlights the distinct role fathers can play in nurturing good mental health in their children. It explores the direct and indirect impact of fathers, from positive supervision and language development, to emotionally buffering mother and child against environmental stresses.



Things about snowdrops...

Did you know that Hodsock Priory (45 mins away by car) opens its grounds and woodland walk at this time of year to see an amazing variety of snowdrops. Find out more if you fancy a different trip out at the weekend (there is an entry fee). Open until Sun 5th March






Things to cook for Valentine's Day...
Not so much cooking as assembling  - a quick but special dessert to show you care! Chocolate fondue with fruit platter