Friday, 17 November 2017

Things in the library 17th Nov...

Things to attend...
The next journal club will be on Tues 21st November, 1-2pm, in the Education and Skills Centre, F Floor, Stephenson Wing.
Papers:​ Steroids and bronchodilators for acute bronchiolitis in the first two years of life and Epinephrine for bronchiolitis
Journal Club is open to all SCH health professionals and is a fun, informal way of learning to criticise papers and gather evidence to change practice. At each meeting a speaker presents a critical appraisal of a research paper, using a recognised appraisal tool such as CASP Group members then have an informal discussion to determine whether or not current practice should be altered in light of the presenter's findings.


Things about mental health...

The Social Care Institute for Excellence's Expert Working Group has developed a new model to improve mental health support for children and young people, which places the young person at the centre. The model is based on ‘I statements’ supported by enablers. The model highlights what good, holistic support for mental health and well-being looks like from the perspective of the young person, and what needs to be in place to make it happen. To support their findings, they then developed an eco-map, to be used in conjunction with the accompanying decision trees. The eco-maps are representations of the choices that should be available to the young person and/or primary caregiver to access the right support and resources.




Things about children's services...
This  report - Turning the Tide -  from the National Children’s Bureau looks at current funding and spend right across children and young people's services. They provide an estimate of how much councils are receiving for children and young people's services and where this is being allocated.







Things about diabetes...
More than 5,000 people are expected to benefit from a pilot project which will see five companies and eight areas of the country test drive a range of apps, gadgets, wristbands and other innovative digital products, which starts this month. Users will be able to access health coaches and online support groups as well as set and monitor goals electronically. Some patients will also receive wearable technology to help them monitor activity levels and receive motivational messages and prompts, which is being made available on the NHS for the first time. This online method of receiving support has the potential to have a similar impact to face-to-face interventions – helping bring down high blood sugar levels and in turn prevent or delay onset of Type 2 diabetes.

Things about turmeric...
My friend's dog Woody swears to the health benefits of turmeric (well his owner's do!)...there is certainly some interesting evidence around it's use although further research is required to resolve uncertainties related to dosage form, dose and medication frequency of turmeric/curcumin. Whether or not it has health benefits this reminded me what a lovely warming spice it is, so here is a quick scrambled egg recipe for lunch/brunch over the weekend.




Friday, 10 November 2017

Things in the library 10th Nov...

Things virtual today and tomorrow...

As part of the ESRC Festival of Social Sciences, there are some exciting free events for all the family to enjoy in the city this weekend.
Urban Extravaganza: The VR Experience Friday 10 November, 12-5pm, repeated on Saturday 11 November, 11am-3pm Winter Garden
This exciting hands-on event will showcase the origins and evolution of five cities (Sheffield, Edinburgh, Manhattan, Liverpool and Manchester) using virtual reality experiences. There will be two virtual reality headsets - one headset is bookable in advance and one headset will operate on a drop-in basis (please note, it may be necessary to queue). The virtual reality experience can be used by children aged 14+ or aged 8+ with parental agreement.
Feeling Good in a Green City Friday 10 November, 12-5pm, repeated on Saturday 11 November, 11am-3pm Winter Garden. Sheffield is one of Europe's greenest cities. People notice different kinds of nature around the city in different ways and not always the 'green' parts. For the first time, you will be able to hear the experiences of other residents of the city at an interactive listening post.
Nature and greenspace can improve our mental well-being. Researchers at the University of Sheffield's Landscape Department will offer you the chance to suggest your own creative ways to connect people with nature in Sheffield and contribute to the mental health of the city's residents.

Things about Clinical Audit...
Clinical Audit Awareness Week is on the horizon (20th - 24th November) and as part of the SCH Trust's celebrations the Quality & Standards Dept  are offering two 2.5hr Bitesize Introduction to Clinical Audit and Service Evaluation sessions.   21st Nov 10:00 - 12.30   24th Nov 14:00 - 16.30
Certificates of attendance will be produced for staff that can be used in portfolios, re-validations, etc. Please book via Learning & Development.




Things about gangs...
From the Children's commissioner is a review of the evidence on the subjective well-being of children involved in gangs in England. Children’s Voices: The Wellbeing of Children involved in Gangs in England


Things about clinical leadership...
This blog from the King's Fund - Clinical leadership – moving from good will to good practice - gives examples from the UK where clinical leadership has made a difference to improved services and quality of care.

Things from NSPCC...
Ensuring children’s voices are heard in research
The NSPCC’s Impact and evidence series features a blog by Dr. Catherine Hamilton-Giachritsis, Reader in Clinical Psychology, University of Bath; Dr. Elly Hanson, Forensic Clinical Psychologist; and Pat Branigan, Development & Impact Manager at the NSPCC discussing the challenges presented by professional gatekeeping, and how to overcome them. Professional gatekeeping happens when professionals are reluctant to identify children and young people to take part in research, which prevents the young person from making an informed choice about whether to take part or not. Strategies to overcome professional gatekeeping include: engaging young people in participation groups and research advisory groups; engaging with practitioners; and finding routes directly to young people.
Impact of online and offline child sexual abuse: "Everyone deserves to be happy and safe"
We live in an increasingly digital world but know relatively little about the effects of CSA carried out using online or digital technologies (technology-assisted CSA, or TA-CSA). NSPCC commissioned researchers from the University of Bath, University of Birmingham and CEOP to find out more.
The research team carried out interviews and questionnaires with a group of young people aged 15-19, who were recruited through the NSPCC, Childline and the National Crime Agency. The research focused on TA-CSA in particular, but sexual abuse often involves both offline and online contexts and environments. Professionals were asked how they perceive TA-CSA, and what impact they think it has on young people

Things to eat...
A nice heart warming salmon dish chosen by Sarah this week ...Gratin of fresh & smoked salmon, beetroot, potatoes & dill





Friday, 3 November 2017

Things in the library 3rd Nov...

Things to attend...
The next journal club for SCH staff will be on Thurs 9th Nov 8am - 9am. The paper presented will be 'Effectiveness of β-Lactam Monotherapy vs Macrolide Combination Therapy for Children Hospitalized With Pneumonia'. Come along and ask us if you want to read the paper in advance.

Things about diabetes and infections...
People with diabetes mellitus (DM) have increased infection risk. The healthcare utilization of pediatric and adolescent diabetic patients with infection is not well defined. This study evaluates the number of pediatric and adolescent patients with DM that seek medical treatment for infection management and assesses its socioeconomic impact. It concludes that children and adolescents with type 1 and type 2 DM commonly present to the ED and require hospitalization for infection evaluation and management. Encounters with infection make up a large proportion of a growing economic burden on the United States’healthcare system. As the prevalence of DM grows, this burden can be expected to become even more significant. Cost-effective strategies for the prevention of infection in pediatric patients with DM are needed.

Things about consent...
Informed consent for pediatric anesthesia is unique because it is obtained from surrogates (ie, parents) rather than from the patient and sought after parents have authorized the surgical intervention. There is limited data on how pediatric anesthesia informed and consent discussions are conducted. The purpose of this study was to characterize the content of preanesthesia informed consent discussions and assess their impact on parent recall and understanding.

Things about breastfeeding and asthma...
The conclusion of this study was that ' In a pediatric population with asthma, children who had been breastfed had a statistically significantly lower risk of asthma exacerbations later in life compared to asthmatic children who had not been breastfed.'

Things about breastfeeding and SIDS...
This study looked at 2267 SIDS cases and 6837 control infants from eight case-control studies. Although the variables collected in each study varied slightly, limiting their ability to include all studies in the analysis and control for all confounders, the conclusion was that breastfeeding duration of at least 2 months was associated with half the risk of SIDS. Breastfeeding does not need to be exclusive to confer this protection.





Things about CQC and mental health...
The report of the first phase of a Government-commissioned review of mental health services for children and young people in England has been officially released (Friday 27 October). The CQC has drawn on existing reports, research and other evidence and its inspections of children and young people’s mental health services, as well as conversations with young people to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the current system. The report confirms many of the issues raised in the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health published in 2016 and in particular, comments on the difficulties children and young people face in accessing appropriate support for their mental health concerns from a system that is fragmented and where services vary in quality. During phase two of the thematic review, CQC will undertake fieldwork to identify what helps local services to achieve, or hinders them from achieving, improvements in the quality of mental health services for children and young people, as set out in the NHS’s Five Year Forward View for Mental Health.

Things about ME to watch...
The Clinical Academic Society and Sheffield Academic Medicine Society are delighted to be hosting a screening of the multi-award winning documentary UNREST at the University of Sheffield. Time for Unrest is a global impact campaign that seeks to increase awareness, education, research and funding around ME. This condition is generally not taught in undergraduate medical education and can be misunderstood within the medical profession. Unrest gives an insight into how debilitating ME/CFS can be and an opportunity to discuss the condition with a panel of clinicians and those with first hand experience.  Unrest world-premiered January in the documentary competition at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, where it won a Special Jury Prize for editing. It has also recently been submitted as an Oscar consideration.

This event is primarily to educate and is therefore free to medical students, junior doctors, consultants and other medical professionals as well as University staff and students who have an interest. The screening is also open to the public with a small donation to the local charity Sheffield ME Group.
Tickets are available here: Eventbrite

Things about us...

You don't have to access the library to use many of our services but if you want to see what we look like (and our view out on a rather grey day) then look at these amateur (ie shaky) videos on our Google+ site!  You might also like some of our Training Resources to help you with various tasks.




Things about Childline...
NSPCC's Childline service gives children and young people a safe and confidential space to talk, be listened to and get support. In 2016/17 they provided more than 295,000 counselling sessions. Their annual review explores what children and young people are telling Childline during counselling sessions. It looks at who is contacting Childline, why, when and how. It focuses on 3 key areas and it highlights strategies that young people tell Childline they find helpful when coping with challenges.

  • anxiety
  • suicidal thoughts and feelings
  • what children who are d/Deaf, disabled or have a health condition are talking to Childline about.


Things to eat...

This roast veg and chickpea stew from Deliciously Ella sounds nice....although we will be munching on a joint of pork cooked on the bbq accompanied by all the trimmings making the best roast pork sandwiches ever at our big family bonfire party!



Friday, 27 October 2017

Things in the library 27 Oct

Things about transporting babies...
Medical care for newborn infants is provided at different levels, ranging from well-baby nurseries to highly specialised intensive care units. There have been numerous studies on neonatal transport and most of them have been descriptive and, or, quality assessments that have had a predominantly strong focus on intensive care transport. In this article Hennequin et al describe their experience of transferring relatively well babies between hospitals using skin-to-skin care (STS) during transport.

Things about cyber attacks...
The report has been published today on the WannaCry cyber attack on the NHS back in may. Although we were not infected we certainly experienced disruption. The NHS has looked at the lessons that can be learnt and steps to prevent such disruption happening again include:

  • develop a response plan setting out what the NHS should do in the event of a cyber attack and establish the roles and responsibilities of local and national NHS bodies and the Department;
  • ensure organisations implement critical CareCERT alerts, including applying software patches and keeping anti-virus software up to date and identifying;
  • ensure essential communications are getting through during an incident when systems are down; and
  • ensure that organisations, boards and their staff are taking the cyber threat seriously, understand the direct risks to front-line services and are working proactively to maximise their resilience and minimise the impact on patient care.
Things about child development...
Deliberate practice is essential for acquiring a wide range of skills that have been central to humans’ adaptive success, yet little is known about when and how children develop this capability. This study examined 4- to 7-year-olds’ ability to selectively practice a skill that would be useful in the near future, as well as their broader understanding of the role of deliberate practice in skill acquisition. Six- and 7-year-olds demonstrated both an explicit understanding of deliberate practice and the capacity to practice without being prompted. Five-year-olds showed an understanding of deliberate practice and some capacity to practice, whereas 4-year-olds showed neither of these capabilities. 

Things about global developmental delay...
Global developmental delay (GDD) affects 1%-3% of the population of children under 5 years of age, making it one of the most common conditions presenting in paediatric clinics; causes are exogenous, genetic (non-metabolic) or genetic (metabolic). Recent advances in biotechnology and genetic testing mean that the investigations available to perform for children under 5 years are increasing and are more sensitive than previously. This change in availability and type of testing necessitates an update in the recommendations for investigating GDD. The study concludes that "We may need to update present recommendations in the UK for investigation of developmental delay. This would include microarray testing as first line and a more thorough approach to investigations for metabolic disorders that can be treated. Clinical assessment remains vital for guiding investigations."


Things about chronic disease...

Self-efficacy (SE) is a strong predictor of health outcomes in chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to develop a valid and reliable SE scale for adolescents and young adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBDSES-A, a 13-item disease-specific scale to assess SE toward disease management, demonstrates good reliability and construct validity and could be a useful tool in understanding the role of SE in pediatric IBD self-management and outcomes.





Things about meningitis... 
A systematic review and meta-analysis to address the question “what is the impact of meningitis on IQ and development.” found moderate evidence that surviving bacterial meningitis has a deleterious impact on IQ and development but no evidence that viral meningitis had meaningful cognitive impacts. Survivors of bacterial meningitis should be routinely offered screening for cognitive deficits and developmental delay in addition to hearing loss.

Things about families and green spaces...
The Department of Landscape and IWUN project invites you to the first seminar of the 2017/18 'Health in Place' seminar series. In the first of this series of seminars, Dr Anna Cronin de Chavez (Born in Bradford Project) discusses a qualitative study of families with 0-3s use of green spaces in a multi-cultural, urban area. The seminar will take place:  Tuesday 14 November 2017 Time: 4 - 5pm  in ICCOS Conference room, University of Sheffield, S1 4DP.
This paper presents the findings of a study to explore the use of green spaces of 0-3 year olds alongside practical, physical, social, cultural and economic barriers and enablers of giving young children access to green spaces. Event is free but book your place here

Things to eat...
This Creamy squash linguine sounds lovely...though I might be biased as it features probably my favourite fresh herb...sage!

Things to discuss...
Reminder that it is reading group next Wednesday at 17.15 in the library...come and join us! We are discussing 'The Graveyard book' this week by Neil Gaiman






Friday, 20 October 2017

Things in the library 20th Oct...

Happy Diwali to those celebrating this week



Things about young people...
Just published is the report on  'Key Data on young people 2017: Latest information and statistics' by the association for young people's health. One of their central aims is to promote evidence-based practice by making research findings more accessible. By sharing learning and best practice they aim to promote and provide better services to meet young people’s particular health needs.





Things about re-validation for nurses...
If you want to see all the resources we think would be useful for you if you are re-validating then just type 'revalidation' into the search box on our library catalogue or click this link. If you find any other resources that are useful let us know and we will see if we can add them to our collection







Things to make your own...
Anyone can search our library catalogue on the internet but if you log in with your library ticket number and a PIN (available on request), then you can improve the functionality. You will be able to renew and reserve books on line, create and email resource lists of useful items and leave reviews for other users. Having a PIN also means you can download the App Android  or Apple for managing your library account from your smart phone.






Things happening in the library...

The next journal club will be on Wednesday 25 October, 5.30 - 6.30 pm in the Education and Skills Centre, F Floor, Stephenson Wing. the paper being discussed is 'A randomized trial of single-dose oral dexamethasone versus multidose prednisolone for acute exacerbations of asthma in children who attend the Emergency department'. All SCH staff welcome. Contact us if you want a copy of the paper.



Things to make...
Halwa/Halva is a very popular sweet dish usually made for special occasions such as Diwali. This version uses pumpkins so you can eat this to celebrate Diwali but also make use of the inside of a pumpkin if you are celebrating Halloween at the end of the month!

Things a little spooky...
This is an opportunity to remind you that our next Reading Group meeting is on 1st Nov and we will be discussing 'The Graveyard Book'








Friday, 13 October 2017

Things in the library 13th October...

Things about very low birthweight...
A recent article in The Journal of Pediatrics evaluated the impact of major neonatal morbidities on the risks for rehospitalization in children and adolescents born of very low birth weight. They concluded  specific major neonatal morbidities as well as the number of morbidities were associated with excess risks of rehospitalization through childhood and adolescence. The full details can be found here


Things about medical apps...
(c) Jannie Iivonen
This article by Matt Burgess, of Wired, explains how they tested the symptom checkers of Ada, Babylon and Your.MD to find out how reliable they really are.
The work concluded that 34 per cent of the time the checkers managed to make the correct diagnosis. Within the top 20 diagnosis given, they were correct 58 per cent of the time. Care advice was correct almost two-thirds of the times (ranging from 33 per cent to 78 per cent).


Things about other health librarians...
A day in the life of a Welsh health librarian is detailed here as part of Libraries week - she was shortlisted for Welsh Librarian of the Year and one of the comments in her nomination was:
“... I have found in my 17 years of working as a consultant and the five preceding years as a registrar the one certain and sure source of knowledge and wisdom was via Isabel...I would state categorically that any health organisation that wishes to be innovative must not merely invest in excellent library services (including an extensive stock of books and journals) but also reward and support librarians like Isabel.  Put simply without an Isabel no organisation can be truly innovative.”
Dr Mark Temple, Consultant in Public Health Medicine, Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre (CDSC).
We are always grateful for the comments and feedback we receive - if we have had an impact on your work please let us know.

Things about sharing health info with children...

The Patient Information Forum is holding an event in London on 'Health Information for Children and Young People' on Friday 3 November 2017. If you have any queries about this event please contact admin@pifonline.org.uk. The event will share learning, best practice and good examples of:

  • Innovative approaches to sharing information with children and young people
  • Co-creating and involving children/young people in the development of health information
  • Top tips for engaging with (or writing for) different age groups
Things about eggs...
You probably heard in the news this week that UK Lion mark eggs have been declared safe for pregnant women and young children, nearly 30 years after a salmonella scare. More information and link to the full report..



More Things to eat...
(c) Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times
A nice vegetarian meal 'Lasagna With Spicy Roasted Cauliflower' which I spotted on NewYork Times website this week. Some of the measurements are in cups but I think it will be easy to follow. It mentions Marinara sauce - a name I wasn't familiar with - but basically any preferred tomato/onion/garlic/herb sauce that you would normally use. In fact according to Wikipedia "Marinara sauce is an Italian tomato sauce that originated in Naples, usually made with tomatoes, garlic, herbs, and onions. Its many variations can include the addition of capers, olives, spices, and a dash of wine"










Friday, 6 October 2017

Things in the library 6th October...

Things about children and research...
A recent article in British Journal of Occupational Therapy discusses 'Using children and young people as advocates to inform research design'. The key messages from the paper were that:
  • Involvement of young advocates with physical disabilities and communication difficulties was helpful to research study design.
  • Occupational therapy researchers should involve advocates at a collaborative level throughout the research process.


Things about volunteering and wellbeing...

'The health and 
wellbeing impacts 
of volunteering with 
The Wildlife Trusts' has been published. 
This study, carried out by the Green Exercise Team at the University of Essex, analysed data relating to the participation of 139 people in Wildlife Trusts projects between February 2016 and February 2017. It assessed changes in participants’ attitudes, behaviour and mental wellbeing over the course of 12 weeks, as a result of taking part in nature conservation volunteering programmes run by 5 Wildlife Trusts across the North, Midlands and South West of England. The principal finding was that the mental wellbeing of participants improved significantly over the 12-week period, and that improvements were greatest for people who had not previously taken part in Wildlife Trust activities. At the start of the study period, 39% of participants reported low wellbeing, compared to UK norms. After 12 weeks, this had reduced to 19%. Participants also reported enhanced levels of positivity, health, nature relatedness, pro-environmental behaviour, levels of physical activity and increased contact with greenspace.

Things about eating disorders and IBD...
Research has shown that there is an association between Inflammatory Bowel Disease, anxiety and mood disorders, however little is known about their association with Eating Disorders. This review article 'Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Eating Disorders: A systematized review of comorbidity' highlights the following:
  • Symptomatology overlaps between Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Eating Disorders.
  • Comorbidity should be considered in the differential diagnosis.
  • Crohn's Disease and Anorexia Nervosa is the most frequent reported comorbidity.
  • A delayed diagnosis of this comorbidity may lead to poorer prognosis.
  • A multidisciplinary approach would be necessary to manage these cases.
Things about ADHD...
A review article published in the open access Journal of Lipids asked 'Do Omega-3/6 Fatty Acids Have a Therapeutic Role in Children and Young People with ADHD?'  They conclude "ADHD is a debilitating neurodevelopmental disorder that can impact heavily on children and young people’s behaviour, mental health, education, and social/family lives. Whilst conventional medications have a role to play in the management of ADHD symptoms, new clinically trialled evidence indicates that omega-3/6 supplementation programmes can provide a promising adjunctive therapy, lowering the dose of psychopharmacologic medications needed and subsequently improving compliance with these." 

Things about Reading Group...
Our friendly group met this week to discuss the book 'Room' which we gave a score of 71%. Our next book is one that is actually aimed at older children but it has a wider appeal. So if you want to join us on 1st November at 17:15 for about 1 hour then the book to read is Neil Gaiman's 'The Graveyard Book'. all welcome - drinks and nibbles provided.

At our December meeting we will be having a 'Winter Miscellany' accompanied by seasonal fare. Come along to share in poems/readings with a Winter/Christmas theme and suggestions of what books you would like to read over next year. So if you would like to join us and influence what we read then put the date 6th December in your diaries now.

Things about Libraries...
To celebrate the first ever Libraries Week, the Illingworth library will be holding drop-in sessions each day during the week 9th  to 14th October at 11.00 and 15:00. Come along for cakes, coffee and a chat. Sign up for a 'Book a Librarian' session and discuss how the library can support you in your work.

Things nutty...
(C) www.woodlandtrust.org.uk
Now is the time to forage for wild hazelnuts...though its unlikely that the squirrels will have left any ripe ones for you to find. However some wholefood shops may sell fresh ones - they may also be known as cobnuts (slightly bigger) or filberts. If you are not lucky enough to get fresh nuts then supermarket dried hazelnuts can be used in many recipes both sweet and savoury. They go particularly well with chocolate and with pears; but for something savoury that would be a quick starter/lunch  or a vegetarian main course try Mushrooms baked with hazelnuts and pecorino