Friday, 14 February 2020

Things in the library 14th Feb...

Things to visit the library for today...
Free home-made heart biscuits (while stocks last) for all our library users today...and a reminder that via our Book a Librarian service you can arrange 1:1 or small group training on a variety of subjects....any time of the year not just on St Valentine's Day.




Things for a healthy childhood...
A safe, supportive and happy childhood environment is widely understood to be vital for a child’s development, health and wellbeing over the short- and long-term. Conversely, an established body of evidence shows a correlation between a disruptive, adverse or chaotic childhood environment and an increased prevalence of physical and mental health problems. Despite this established evidence base, the BMA's analysis of recent data highlights insufficient investment in England across a range of services to support a healthy childhood, with funding for a number of different services being cut in recent years. This lack of resource is likely to have an adverse impact on child health in England.

Things about microbiomics...
The Department of Neuroscience at University of Sheffield will co-host an event on Thursday 16 April to mark the launch of the Sheffield Microbiomics Network. This one-day symposium will take place in Sheffield (location TBC) and is open to anyone working in a field relating to microbiomics, or who is keen to embark on research in this area. Please register using this link. Anyone involved in microbiomics research in Sheffield (in any university, NHS or other institution) would be very welcome to join.

Things about indoor air...
There seems to be plenty of air outside at the moment...I just wish it would stop rushing around so fast! However whilst we are all stuck inside at this time of the year this RCPCH report on indoor air quality seems timely. This report is based on a systematic review of the science of indoor pollution, and conversations with children, young people and families. They make recommendations for Government and local authorities, and provide guidance for families.

Things about resilience...
Too many children and young people nationally do not receive the support they need to improve their mental health and wellbeing. There is ample evidence that, despite increased investment in, and policy focus on, mental health services for children and young people, the numbers of children and young people requiring support are going up. Thresholds for accessing support remain high, waiting times are long and there is significant inequity in provision between different local areas.

The purpose of this research from the Local Government Association is, firstly, to explore some of the factors which are contributing to this nationally challenging context and, secondly, to develop an evidence base for how local government and its partners can work most effectively together to deliver a coherent and joined-up offer of support for children and young people’s mental health. The research is based on a review of the existing evidence base, workshops with around 80 participants from councils and their partners in health and in-depth engagements with eight fieldwork areas.

Things about the NHS...
When the NHS Long Term Plan was published in January 2019 Healthwatch were asked by NHS England to engage with people across the country about how people wanted the priorities to be implemented locally. Here's what over 40,000 people told them. Key findings summarised below:

  • People affected by cancer, and heart and lung conditions had a much better experience of care services than people with other issues.
  • The positive feedback about cancer and heart and lung services appeared to be for a variety of reasons, including speed of diagnosis and treatment, access to rehabilitation, and quality of information and communication from professionals.
  • People affected by other issues, especially mental ill health, dementia or learning disabilities, told us that the support often wasn’t in place for them and that professionals did not give enough consideration to their full range of needs.

Things about St Valentine...

On February 14, around the year 270 A.D., Valentine, a holy priest in Rome in the days of Emperor Claudius II, was executed. Under the rule of Claudius the Cruel, Rome was involved in many unpopular and bloody campaigns. The emperor had to maintain a strong army, but was having a difficult time getting soldiers to join his military leagues. Claudius believed that Roman men were unwilling to join the army because of their strong attachment to their wives and families. To get rid of the problem, Claudius banned all marriages and engagements in Rome. Valentine, realizing the injustice of the decree, defied Claudius and continued to perform marriages for young lovers in secret. When Valentine’s actions were discovered, Claudius ordered that he be put to death. The sentence was carried out on February 14, on or about the year 270.
Legends vary on how the martyr’s name became connected with romance. The date of his death may have become mingled with the Feast of Lupercalia, a pagan festival of love. On these occasions, the names of young women were placed in a box, from which they were drawn by the men as chance directed. In 496 A.D., Pope Gelasius decided to put an end to the Feast of Lupercalia, and he declared that February 14 be celebrated as St Valentine’s Day.

Things to make...
A special chocolate and chilli dessert, very simple...and sinful!










Friday, 7 February 2020

Things in the library 7th February...

Things to read...

Watch out for meteor showers and the plants in your city...our next book is the 1950s sci-fi classic 'Day of the Triffids' which we will be discussing on 4th March. Our last read Edith Wharton's  'Age of Innocence' scored 71%. One interesting fact I found whilst researching the author (whose maiden name was Jones) is that it is believed the phrase 'keeping up with the Joneses' was originally referring to her wealthy New York, high society family.

Things to watch...
Health Education England NHS have launched two short animations showcasing the benefits of working with NHS Librarians & Knowledge Specialists:



- Why work with Librarians and Knowledge Specialists?

- The benefits of working with Librarians and Knowledge Specialists 

Please take a couple of minutes to watch these and if you or your department want help to manage your knowledge do please talk to us. That's why we are here!


Things to listen to...
University of Sheffield Concerts have announced their upcoming season which brings a host of musical treats to take you from the cold winter nights right through to the cusp of summer.
They have jazz offerings in the form of two trios – the Barry Green Trio and the Jason Rebello Trio. Expect inventive, versatile and accomplished playing from these stalwarts of the UK and international jazz scenes.
In March world music fusion from Kabantu is on offer along with a concert from  the Ligeti Quartet, playing music to honour stop motion animators while blending pop and techno influences.
To round off the season Will Pound pays a return visit to present A Day Will Come – a musical journey across the states of the European Union. Mark Radcliffe, from BBC Radio 2, thinks Will is “a flat-out genius”. Come along and find out for yourself!
Complementing these performers are a range of concerts from the talented musicians found within the University. On offer is a range of concerts from student ensembles, free lunchtime and rush hour concerts and Sound Junction; the boundary-pushing weekend of music presented in conjunction with the University of Sheffield Sound Studios.

Things to attend...
world food festivalMany University events are open to the public -including public lectures, drama, exhibitions and family events. the deatails can be browsed here. The World Food festival is coming up on Sunday 16th February.

Do you use music ...
If you are working in Sheffield (or its direct surroundings), and employ music making or listening in any activities in a professional capacity, involving (others) then Music Mind Machine lab at the University of Sheffield Department of Music would love to hear from you! They are interested in any ways, no matter how big or small, in which your organisation is using music for health or wellbeing.
For example, it may be that you are using music with individuals or groups, to support mental, social, or physical health or wellbeing. Specific aims might include (but not limited to):

  • actively promoting physical health
  • improving mood and providing comfort
  • promoting access to music
  • bringing together and build connections within the community (community music)
  • easing pain
  • increasing mobility and promoting exercise
  • reducing stress and or anxiety
  • promoting education

Their goal is to make the topic of music for well-being more visible and easy to access, as well as to create a map of music and well-being in Sheffield. This project is supported by Research England.

Things to announce...
Next week we will announce the winner of our 70th birthday library website quiz...we are gathering some nice prizes for this and our next quiz thanks to Blackwell's Bookshop,  Smörgås (the Scandinavian themed cafe located opposite the Hallamshire hospital) and some other local businesses.







Things to eat...

These Blueberry cheesecake brûlée pots are a great and very easy dessert to make.

Friday, 31 January 2020

Things in the library 31st Jan...



The last day...                                              
Today is the last chance to sign up for the next Randomised Coffee Trial at SCH, and to take part in our January quiz.        

Things about workload, stress & patient safety...
The Institute for Healthcare Improvement recently dedicated a podcast to this subject.
"The relationship between workload and stress, and the risk this poses for practitioners and patients alike, need more attention. On this episode of WIHI, IHI's longtime safety expert Frank Federico, RPh, and James Won, PhD, talk about the field of human factors in health care, and the role that human factors can play in addressing today's work-related stress."
You will need to create a free account to login to access the content.

Things about patient complaints...
A blog from Sir Robert Francis QC explains how hospitals can cultivate public trust in complaints. This new report – Shifting the mindset (2020) – investigates how hospitals report on complaints and whether current efforts are sufficient to build public trust.
"Complaints should be seen by hospitals as an opportunity to learn. The public expects the NHS to learn from mistakes, and to be kept informed about how these changes are made. Four in five people have told us that seeing where other people’s complaints have made a difference would encourage them to speak up. Yet fewer than half of NHS hospitals in England (38%) are reporting on any action taken in response to complaints raised by patients and loved ones. Complaints are a valuable tool which help hospitals spot and tackle issues quickly. They should not be seen by hospitals as something to ‘be managed’, but as an opportunity to learn and improve. To have a complaints system that works, the NHS must give patients the confidence to speak up by showing them how their views are heard and acted upon."
Things about technology in the classroom...

Trials of pioneering technology to help disabled pupils in the classroom will take place across the country in the first programme of its kind in the world. Speaking at a education technology show on 22 January, Universities, Science, Research and Innovation Minister Chris Skidmore announced plans to fund trials of ground-breaking assistive technology for pupils with special educational needs and disabilities in up to 100 schools and colleges.
Innovations are expected to include ‘text-to-speech’ and ‘speech recognition’ software, which can help pupils with dyslexia improve their reading and proof-reading. Other trials include the use of eye-gaze technology, which can help pupils with severe motor impairments to communicate, helping to level the playing field for children with additional needs.


Things about the King's Fund...
The King's Fund have chosen three areas of focus for the next five years, where they feel they have the greatest opportunity to use their skills and resources to improve health and care.


                                            
Things about health inequality...


The Health Foundation and the Nuffield Trust have published their latest QualityWatch on health inequalities.There are different types of inequalities in health care that might arise from the region of the country you live in, your ethnicity, gender, or socio-economic status. This data story takes a closer look at the association between deprivation in the area that a patient lives and quality of care.(It is also a really clear way of visualising data.)

Things about brain development...
From the NSPCC an easy to understand set of web pages on How childhood trauma affects child brain development backed up with a list of references. Using accurate references to show people where your information has come from is something that sometimes daunts those who are returning to education after a period of time. Don't forget that via our Book a Librarian service you can arrange one to one help with using Mendeley (reference managing software) or for a general chat abut how to use quotations and references.

Things the Royal Foundation want to know...
Through their 5 Big Questions, they want to bring together the thoughts of individuals, organisations and businesses so that together we can build the healthiest generation in history by giving every child the best start in life.They want to hear from all adults living across the UK, if you are 16 or above and live in England, Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland, whether you have children or not – there are no right or wrong answers, they want to hear what you think.

Things to eat...
During my time living, working and giving birth(!) in the Netherlands we were close to Den Bosch ('s-Hertogenbosch) so it was a great outing when we had guests to go to a cafe there for Bossche Bollen...think of them as a round eclairs but much bigger...our 2 year old could make a lot of mess with one!

Friday, 17 January 2020

Things in the library 17th January...

Things about healthcare systems...

The Association of Directors of Children’s Services published a position paper 'A health care system that works for all children' last year (ADCS is the national leadership association in England for statutory directors of children's services and their senior teams). In their executive summary they state:
"ADCS members believe that now, more than ever, there is a real need for a national commitment to ensure that the NHS of the future has children at it’s heart and children’s health and wellbeing services are given parity with those of older people."
Things about CAMHS...
The Education Policy Institute (EPI) has published its Annual Report on access to child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS). The study examines access to specialist services, waiting times for treatment, and provision for the most vulnerable children in England. The research is based on new data obtained using freedom of information (FOI) requests to mental health providers and local authorities over the course of a year. This data is not published by the NHS. The majority of lifelong mental health problems develop early on, during childhood or adolescence. The wider economic costs of mental ill health in England are vast, estimated at £105bn each year.

Things in the news today...
Sepsis
Global, regional, and national sepsis incidence and mortality, 1990–2017: analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study is the article on which the headlines are commenting. The interpretation of the results from the authors is:
"Despite declining age-standardised incidence and mortality, sepsis remains a major cause of health loss worldwide and has an especially high health-related burden in sub-Saharan Africa."

Social Media
Along with exploring the impact of screen time generally, this paper 'Technology use and the mental health of children and young people' from the Royal College of Psychiatrists also explores the impact of different types of screen use: negative content; how vulnerable groups may be affected such as those with mental health problems and very young
children; potential for bullying and safeguarding issues; as well as the potential for addiction. In addition, guidance is provided for children and young people, parents and carers, clinicians and teachers.

Things about patient feedback...
The National Institute for Health Research published a themed review this week on Improving Care by Using Patient Feedback. There are many different reasons for looking at patient experience feedback data. Data is most often used for performance assessment and benchmarking in line with regulatory body requirements,  making comparisons with other healthcare providers or to assess progress over time. Staff are sometimes unaware of the feedback, or when they are, they struggle to make sense of it in a way that can lead to improvements. They are not always aware of unsolicited feedback, such as that received online and when they are, they are often uncertain how to  respond. 
  • Staff need the time, skills and resources to make changes in practice. In many organisations, feedback about patient experience is managed in different departments from those that lead quality improvement. Whilst most organisations have a standardised method for quality improvement, there is less clarity and consistency in relation to using patient experience data.
  • Staff act on informal feedback in ways that are not always recognised as improvement. Where change does happen, it tends to be on transactional tasks rather than relationships and the way patients feel. 
  • The research featured in this review shows that these challenges can be overcome and provides recommendations and links to practical resources for services and staff.
Things to take part in...
The next Randomised Coffee Trial will be taking place in the SCH Trust in February. Sign-up now via this link . If you previously asked to be included in all future RCTs there is no need to sign up again. If you are new to the Trust - our RCTs run two or three times a year, you sign up and are randomly matched to someone else and you arrange to meet at a mutually convenient time for 30-40 mins to chat about anything you like. It is a good way of meeting new colleagues, taking time out and widening networks. The positive responses we get show how much it is enjoyed. Last time we had a few people who signed up but then didn't make contact with their matchee..please be courteous and inform the library and the other person if you cannot meet so that we can try to re-match the other person.

Things to make...
If you want a nice brunch dish there are some good suggestions here based on baked eggs.

Friday, 10 January 2020

Things in the library 10th Jan...

Things that are calming...
Childline has launched Calm Zone - an online hub of calming techniques and resources for young people to help them feel better when they feel anxious, scared or sad.


Things about research ethics...
NSPCC are looking for an experienced researcher to join their Research Ethics Committee.Their Research Ethics Committee is made up of experienced researchers from outside the NSPCC who review research proposals, provide an impartial review of the ethical implications of evaluation and research proposals and work collaboratively with researches to address any concerns. They are seeking expressions of interest from an experienced researcher who has:

  • a detailed understanding of the dimensions of ethics and issues related to research with children and young people
  • an understanding of the ethical issues associated with quantitative methods in the context of sensitive research with children and young people
  • substantive experience of research governance.

Things to do tomorrow (Sat 11th Jan)...
The University of Sheffield's  Landscape Team is offering free Christmas tree chipping in the Information Commons car park from 8am-2pm on Saturday 11 January 2020. Just arrive with your tree at any point between these times and they'll put it through their chipper. Once the chippings have broken down, they'll be used as mulch across campus to keep it bright and beautiful throughout 2020.
This chipping service is open to everyone, not just staff and students, so do share with your friends and neighbours. The car park is on Favell Road (accessed via Hounsfield Road off Glossop Road and then Leaveygreave Rd).

Things to win yourself a prize...
Find your way around our library website and enter this 70th birthday quiz. The winning entry will be chosen from all correct entries received by 4pm on Friday 31st January.




Things to read...
The next book to read for our monthly Reading Group is Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton. The meeting to discuss this will be on Wed 5th Feb at 17:15 in the library. Edith Wharton's most famous novel, written immediately after the end of the First World War, is a brilliantly realised anatomy of New York society in the 1870s, the world in which she grew up, and from which she spent her life escaping. Newland Archer, Wharton's protagonist, charming, tactful, enlightened, is a thorough product of this society; he accepts its standards and abides by its rules but he also recognises its limitations. His engagement to the impeccable May Welland assures him of a safe and conventional future, until the arrival of May's cousin Ellen Olenska puts all his plans in jeopardy. Independent, free-thinking, scandalously separated from her husband, Ellen forces Archer to question the values and assumptions of his narrow world. As their love for each other grows, Archer has to decide where his ultimate loyalty lies.

Things written by you and your colleagues...
We now have an online repository of references to articles written recently by SCH staff. We are cataloguing the PubMed abstracts and if you cannot access the article's full text then we will be able to supply in the usual way- charges may apply - or you can ask your colleague! We hope that this will highlight the amount of published material written by SCH staff  (240 items to date) and be helpful in disseminating it widely to colleagues. Please note that we only list SCH authors/co-authors on the catalogue records.

Things to eat...


I made this Coconut fish curry this week which was very quick but still excellent with plenty of taste.




Friday, 3 January 2020

Things in the library 3rd Jan ...

Happy New Year to all SCH staff and to our Library users

Things to celebrate...
This year marks the 70th birthday of our library. In May 1950 the decision was made that there should be a selection of books and journals available for staff to use and so the first library was formed - located in the stenographers office somewhere close to where Theo's cafe is now.
During the year we will be marking this birthday with a series of special events highlighting the work of the library from the past, the present and looking forward to the future. Cake and prizes will feature!

Things about immunisation...
The World Health Organisation (Europe) has developed a Tailoring Immunization Programme (TIP). The phases and steps of a TIP process are described in detail in this document, supported by inspiration examples and exercises for TIP planning workshop. To achieve high and equitable vaccination uptake, it is necessary to understand the barriers to vaccination among the population groups with sub-optimal coverage. Then solutions can be designed which support, motivate and enable people to be vaccinated. Solutions which ensure all population groups are vaccinated, regardless of their income, education, age, geography, ethnicity, religion or philosophical beliefs. 

Things about tooth decay...
A whole system approach to tackling childhood tooth decay has been proposed by Local Government Association in their report. Too many children still experience problems at a young age – nearly a quarter of five-year olds have decayed, missing or filled teeth and children from deprived areas have more than twice the level of decay than children from the least deprived areas. It means tooth decay remains the most common reason for hospital admission in children aged six to 10, with those from deprived areas most likely to suffer problems.Dental treatment under general anaesthetic presents a small but real risk of life threatening complications. What is more, poor oral health can affect children’s ability to sleep, eat, speak, play and socialise with other children. It can disrupt school attendance and lead to parents needing to take time off work.
This report contains a whole range of examples of the steps that need to be taken to achieve success. Many of the areas included are places where there have traditionally been high rates of tooth decay, but where significant improvements are now being made.

Things Hygge...
University restaurant Inox above the Student's Union will again be celebrating the Danish celebration of Hygge. Between Monday 20 to Friday 24 January their menus will be dedicated to this celebration of wellbeing. They are promising to deliver a delicious menu - in their calming restaurant and lounge. Go along and try some new, different dishes and take time for your own wellbeing. Inox will see a transformation with candles, dimmed lights and calming music, to become an escape from those busy every day lives. Tables throughout the week with themed menus. From 3.50 GBP per person more details on their website.

Things to join...
Our well attended Reading Group will be meeting on Wednesday 8th January at 17:15 to chat about The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey.

Journal Club is another event happening next week, on Thursday 9th from 08:00 to 9:00 in the Clinical Skills Centre F Floor, Stephenson Wing. 


Things leftover...
I hope all your Christmas foods have now been consumed but if you have any New Year's cheese left over there are some great ideas of how to use it up before starting on your January diets! I think this Cheese, leek and potato tortilla sounds quick and easy.




Friday, 20 December 2019

Things in the library 20 Dec...

Things festive and dusty...
We will be having our annual pre-Christmas workout in the library on Monday....our stocktake day. We will be closed all day but will be open in the evening from 17:00 until 19:00.

We are then closed over Christmas and New Year, re-opening on Thursday Jan 2nd so we wish you all a Merry Christmas & a Happy New Year. If you need to return items when we are closed then a book-drop box is available outside the library.

Things about cell genomics...
There is a SITraN external seminar  on January 10th 12:00 - 13:00 in Meeting rooms B02/B03, SITraN, 385a Glossop Road. The speaker is John Marioni - Cancer Research Uk, Cambridge / European Bioinformatics Institute , University of Cambridge
Title: "Using single cell genomics to understand cell fate decisions"
With recent technological developments it has become possible to characterise a single cell’s genome, epigenome, transcriptome and proteome. However, to take advantage of such data it is critical that appropriate computational methods are applied and developed. In this presentation, I will describe some of the computational challenges and the solutions we have developed, focusing particularly on applications in the context of cell fate decisions in early mammalian development.

Things about neonates...
The Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership has published National Neonatal Audit Programme 2019: annual report on 2018 data.  The National Neonatal Audit Programme (NNAP) reports on key measures of the care provided to babies in 181 neonatal services across England, Wales, Scotland and the Isle of Man.  Included in this annual report for the first time is network level reporting of mortality until discharge from the neonatal unit, and adherence to neonatal nurse staffing standards.

and also...
NHS England has published Implementing the recommendations of the Neonatal Critical Care Transformation Review.  This action plan to implement the recommendations of the Neonatal Critical Care Transformation Review sets out how the NHS will further improve neonatal care with the support of funding set out in the NHS Long Term Plan.

Things about Paediatric Intensive Care...
The Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership has published Paediatric Intensive Care Audit Network: Annual Report 2019.  This is the sixteenth annual PICANet clinical audit report summarising paediatric critical care that took place in the United Kingdom and Republic of  Ireland between 2016 and 2018.  It provides data on five key metrics: case ascertainment; retrieval mobilisation times; number of qualified nurses per bed; emergency readmissions within 48 hours and mortality in PICU.

Image by Hans Braxmeier from Pixabay 
Things carolling...
If you want to catch some Christmas carol singing in Sheffield over the next few days then this search should bring you plenty of choice.





Things to eat...
Savoury Baklava Recipe for VegetariansIf you are catering for vegetarians (or anyone else!) over the Christmas period there are some fantastic recipes here like this savoury spiced baklava.