Friday, 19 May 2017

Things in the library 19 May...

Things about nurses...
As part of National Nurses Week the publishers Wiley are putting together a free health collection updated each month.The collection will cover topics like combating stress, mindfulness
and work-life balance. Plus, they have tips to help us look after our health. The focus for May is fitness – so they have advice on getting more active including a free exercise plan. Access the resources here - you will need to register

Things about sustainability and transformation partnerships...
The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health has published 'State of Child Health short report series: sustainability and transformation partnerships'.  The RCPCH has undertaken a review of Sustainability and Transformation Plans from a child health perspective.  The report finds that while most STPs set out the case for change well and cover important key themes such as prevention, early intervention, more care delivered in the community, better mental health services and integrated working, there is a lack of detail underpinning the vision.  It concludes that the lack of profile given to infants, children and young people by the majority of STPs is a cause for concern.

Things about diabetes...
The National Paediatric Diabetes Audit report for 2015-2016 was been published in February.  It is an analysis of data provided by healthcare professionals working in clinics, hospital wards, hospital departments and any other hospital unit diagnosing and treating children and young people with diabetes mellitus in England and Wales.
This 2015/16 report covers the health checks (care processes) and outcomes for children and young people with diabetes who have attended PDUs during the period from 1st April 2015 through to 31st March 2016. The report acknowledges improvements in diabetes care made during this period, but also aims to highlight deficiencies in care and make specific recommendations to commissioners of health services, regional diabetes networks, and PDUs to address the quality of recording of data relating to patient care and outcomes and the clear inequalities in outcomes across England and Wales.

Things about transition of care...
The Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group have published a review recently on 'Transition of care for adolescents from paediatric services to adult health services'.This review assessed the effectiveness of interventions to improve the transition of care for adolescents with chronic conditions and ongoing healthcare needs, as they transferred from child to adult health services.

Things about nature...
There was an interesting seminar at the University of Sheffield recently 'Can a dose of nature become a standard prescription for a mental health problem?'  and it is possible to watch it or download the slides. This is part of Improving Wellbeing through Urban Nature (IWUN) which is a three year research project aiming to find out more about how Sheffield’s natural environment can improve the health and well-being of the city’s residents, and especially those with disproportionately high levels of poor health.

Things about decisions by children...
Various international laws and guidelines stress the importance of respecting the developing autonomy of children and involving minors in decision-making regarding treatment and research participation. However, no universal agreement exists as to at what age minors should be deemed decision-making competent. Minors of the same age may show different levels of maturity. In addition, patients deemed rational conversation-partners as a child can suddenly become non-compliant as an adolescent. Age, context and development all play a role in decision-making competence. In this article  ( Medical decision-making in children and adolescents: developmental and neuroscientific aspects) the authors adopt a perspective on competence that specifically focuses on the impact of brain development on the child's decision-making process.

Things to eat...
If you cook for someone with diabetes, high cholesterol or high blood pressure than the recipe search on the British Heart Foundation's website might be of interest. You can enter a keyword eg chicken then select  a particular condition or nutritional requirements along with cuisine, meal course and cooking time to make some suggestions for you. Nutritional information is given for each recipe

Friday, 12 May 2017

Things in the library 12 May

Things about baby brains...
This week ground-breaking scans of newborn babies’ brains were published which researchers from all over the world can download and use to study how the human brain develops. The images are beautiful too!
The images are part of the Developing Human Connectome Project (dHCP), a collaboration between King’s College London, Imperial College London and the University of Oxford, which will uncover how the brain develops, including the wiring and function of the brain during pregnancy and how this changes after birth. The dHCP researchers are sharing their images and methods online so that other scientists from around the world can use the data in their own research. It is hoped that pioneer studies into normal and abnormal development, by studying well-phenotyped and genotyped groups of infants with specific genetic and environmental risks, could lead to explanations of conditions such as Autistic Spectrum Disorder or Cerebral Palsy.
Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanners at Evelina London Children’s Hospital, the team has developed new techniques which enable images of the brains of foetuses and babies to be captured.  Researchers have overcome problems caused by babies’ movement and small size, as well as the difficulties in keeping vulnerable infants safe in the MRI scanner, so that they can now produce highly detailed and rich information on brain development.

Things about paediatric nursing...
An article 'The History of Children’s Nursing and Its Direction Within the United Kingdom' was published in 'Comprehensive Child and Adolescent Nursing' this month. This article presents an account of the “evolution of children’s nursing" and also considers the future direction of children’s nursing within the UK. Full text not available via NHS Open Athens account but SCH staff may contact the library if you would like us to obtain it for you. You can do this via this online form.



Things about poverty...
A report published this week from RCPCH and Child Poverty Action group 'Poverty and child health: Views from the frontline' .More than two-thirds of paediatricians surveyed said poverty and low income contribute "very much" to the ill health of children they work with.
They are calling on whoever forms the next Government to tackle poverty urgently through:


  • the restoration of binding national targets to reduce child poverty, backed by a national child poverty strategy
  • the adoption of a ‘child health in all policies’ approach to decision making and policy development, with Her Majesty’s Treasury disclosing information about the impact of the Chancellor’s annual budget statement on child poverty and inequality
  • the reversal of public health cuts to ensure universal early years services, including health visiting and school nursing, are prioritised and supported financially, with additional targeted help for children and families experiencing poverty
  • the reversal of cuts to universal credit which will leave the majority of families claiming this benefit worse off.
Things by our clinicians...
Some familiar names in this book 'Esophageal and Gastric Disorders in Infancy and Childhood' so we have purchased the e-book of this title so it is available to SCH staff via their NHS Athens login or by searching for it in our library catalogue

We also try to add all the SCH article publications we find to our Delicious site...if your recent publications are not there let us know!

Things about eating...
This study 'Infantile Anorexia and Co-parenting: A Pilot Study on Mother–Father–Child Triadic Interactions during Feeding and Play' is pilot research that investigates mother–father–child triadic interactions, during feeding and play, in families with children diagnosed with Infantile Anorexia , in comparison to families with normally developing children.

Things about monitoring heart rates... 
A systematic review of studies assessing novel methods of measuring HR in newborns and infants in the neonatal unit was published this week in Acta Paediatrica. 'A systematic review of novel technology for monitoring infant and newborn heart rate'.  Two investigators completed independent literature searches. Identified papers were independently evaluated, and relevant data were extracted and analysed. Conclusion: This systematic review identified seven new technologies, including camera-based photoplethysmography, reflectance pulse oximetry, laser Doppler methods, capacitive sensors, piezoelectric sensors, electromyography and a digital stethoscope. Clinicians should be aware of several of these, which may become available for clinical use in the near future.

Things about French bread...
(c) Clotilde Dusoulier
Apparently there is a competition each year in Paris to find the best baguette...the winning baker gets to be the official provider of baguettes for the Palais de l’Élysée,  where the president lives and works. This means that the Président de la République eats that baguette daily, but more important, it is the bread served for all the official meals with ambassadors and foreign dignitaries. More fascinating information about the baguette and the best places in Paris to buy them from one of my favourite food bloggers also a recipe to make your own sourdough baguette.




Friday, 5 May 2017

Things in the library 5th May...


Things about concussion...
This article evaluates the evidence regarding the management of sport-related concussion (SRC) in children and adolescents. The eight subquestions include the effects of age on symptoms and outcome, normal and prolonged duration, the role of computerised neuropsychological tests (CNTs), the role of rest, and strategies for return to school and return to sport (RTSp).



Things about nurses...
In April 2017, the House of Lords Select Committee on the Long-Term Sustainability of the NHS concluded that the biggest internal threat to the sustainability of the NHS is the lack of a comprehensive national strategy to secure the NHS and care system the workforce it needs. This briefing 'In short supply: pay policy and nurse numbers' , and its two supplements, examines two of the most important issues in workforce policy today which pose both immediate and long-term risks to the ability of the NHS to sustain high quality care: staffing numbers and standards and the future of NHS pay policy. It highlights that the lack of a coherent workforce strategy which is integrated with funding plans and service delivery models is one of the Achilles heels of the NHS.




Things about well-being in children...
As part of a joint inquiry into children and young people's mental health, the Health and Education Committees found that financial pressures are restricting the provision of mental health services in schools and colleges.
Chair of the House of Commons Health Committee, Dr Sarah Wollaston MP, said:
"With half of all mental illness starting before the age of 15, and three quarters by aged 18, the Government and educators must ensure sufficient time is allowed for activities in schools and colleges that develop the life-long skills children and young people need to support their wellbeing."

Neil Carmichael MP, Chair of the House of Commons Education Committee, said:
"Schools and colleges have a front line role in tackling mental ill health and promoting well-being among children and young people. We have heard, however, that financial pressures are restricting their ability to run services. Schools and colleges must be well resourced to provide on-site support and make referrals where necessary."
Read the full report here

Things to read...
The inaugural meeting of our reading group took place this week...and what a nice bunch of people we are! We will be meeting in the Illingworth Library at 17:15 on the first Wednesday of every month and we have chosen the next few books to read. The group is open to all SCH staff and parents of long-term in-patients are also very welcome. Please read along with us and feel free to drop in to any of the sessions. The books we will be reading and discussing on the dates shown are below - this first one is local as it relates to Wentworth Woodhouse and the surrounding area.
7 Jun  Black Diamonds: the rise and fall of an English dynasty Catherine Bailey
5 July   Elizabeth is missing by Emma Healey
2 Aug  Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe by Fannie Flagg
6 Sep  Lion: a long way home by Saroo Brierley
4 Oct   Room by Emma Donoghue

Things to enjoy...

The Festival of Arts and Humanities started on 2 May and continues until 22 May with events ranging from dance, electroacoustic music, films, talks and more. Special guests include Helen Mort and Ben Aaronovitch and there's poetry from local authors Pete Green and Ben Dorey, the first screening of a film about Barnsley's Dearne Valley and a showing of the cult film Man with a Movie Camera with a new live score. Angie Hobbs (Department of Philosophy) and David Olusoga (historian and author of Black and British: a forgotten history) contribute talks and there's a chance to take part in a Roman Feast and Sheffield Institute of Interdisciplinary Biblical Studies launch their Shiloh Project.More details of these events and the many others that make up the Festival can be found at www.sheffield.ac.uk/festivalah

Things new in the library...
Not a 'thing' at all but Fran who is an intern working with us for a few weeks - she is currently studying for a MA in Librarianship at University of Sheffield. So if you see a new face in the library or out and about with us in the hospital do say 'hello'. I am hoping she might write a guest blog post whilst she is with us!








Things to eat...
For something quick, green and delicious try this Classic Pesto Pasta recipe from Deliciously Ella's food blog.

Thursday, 27 April 2017

Things in the library 28 April...

Things about emergency care...
Quality Watch published a report this week 'Emergency hospital care for  children and young people'. This QualityWatch Focus On looks at children and young people’s use of hospitals, with particular reference to emergency admissions during the 10-year period from 2006/07 to 2015/16. They conclude:
" This report has shown that the previously growing pressures on emergency hospital care from
increasing use by children and young people continue but not at the same rate of increase as before. While the small selection of indicators we looked at suggest that emergency hospital care quality has been maintained, of potential concern is the increase in A&E attendances and emergency admissions in the last few years, coupled with worrying trends for specific conditions and age groups.
Hospital emergency care may be appropriate for many children and young people but there are also those who may, with appropriate support, be safely cared for outside an emergency care setting. This report has identified potential areaswhere improvements in care outside the hospital emergency care setting may lead to reductions in A&E attendances and emergency admissions. However, if there are insufficient resources and alternatives to the emergency hospital care setting or other weak links in the system, it may become difficult to reduce hospital emergency care activity and improve quality of care for children and young people."

Things about young people's health...
The Association for Young People’s Health (AYPH) works closely with policymakers, young people, practitioners and researchers to promote awareness about young people’s health needs. In this update 'Young People’s Health - where are we up to?' they set out the latest policy and practice debates, recent data on trends, and recommendations for ‘where next’. Their key messages are:
  • Many trends in health behaviours and health outcomes for young people are going in a positive direction, but there are also some more worrying indicators. 
  • We are particularly concerned about the implications of new substance use behaviours; relatively high rates of sexually transmitted infections; the lack of a reduction in obesity; helping young people manage long term conditions and warning signs that mental health problems may be increasing.
  • Although it is important to raise the profile of particular health conditions, we argue that we need more effort now on cross-cutting themes in young people’s health
  • These themes include the overlap between physical and mental health; promoting young people’s health in existing outcomes frameworks; understanding the role of adverse childhood experiences; promoting youth friendly health services; ensuring the most vulnerable young people have equal access to health services; and maximising the importance of the education setting for health promotion.
Things for us oldies...
You may have seen the media reporting that physical exercise is a promising intervention to prevent or delay cognitive decline in individuals aged 50 years and older...but if you want to read the actual review article you can find it here 'Exercise interventions for cognitive function in adults older than 50: a systematic review with meta-analysis'

Things about sexual abuse...
'Making Noise' film on YouTube puts the focus on children and young people’s voices for positive change after sexual abuse. It is a project produced by The International Centre, University of Bedfordshire, in collaboration with the NSPCC. The Office of the Children’s Commissioner commissioned the original report. Read the full report at https://www.beds.ac.uk/making-noise

Things about sugar...
The NHS is stepping up its campaign against obesity, diabetes and tooth decay by announcing that sugary drinks will be banned in hospital shops beginning from next year unless suppliers voluntarily take action to cut their sales over the next twelve months. WH Smith, Marks & Spencer, Greggs, the SUBWAY(r) brand, Medirest, ISS and the Royal Voluntary Service are the leading suppliers who have pledged to cut sales. Remaining retailers are now being urged to join them. By April 2018 hospitals must make further efforts, including:
  • 60 per cent of confectionery and sweets stocked do not exceed 250 kcal, rising to 80 per cent of confectionery and sweets in 2018/19.
  • 60 per cent of pre-packed sandwiches and other savoury pre-packed meals to contain 400 kcal or less per serving and do not exceed five grams of saturated fat per 100g, moving to 75 per cent in 2018/19.
Things about precision medicine...
Children with Cancer UK,  is providing £1.5m funding to advance Precision Medicine in the UK, and make this field of treatment a reality for children and young adults diagnosed with cancer. 
Not generally available on the NHS, the ambition is to get Precision Medicine off the ground in the UK so it can be adopted nationally, available for every young cancer patient who would otherwise face less effective, more toxic treatment. This includes:
  • Improved treatments for high-risk cancers with extremely poor survival rates
  • The reduction of the long-term adverse impact of aggressive treatments
  • Better understanding of the causes of cancer in children and young people
  • The integration of advanced genetic technologies directly into clinical practice
Precision Medicine is an emerging approach to disease treatment and prevention and takes into account individual variations in genes, environment and lifestyle. Precision therapies target specific changes in individual patients’ tumour DNA, allowing for more effective treatments while reducing toxic side effects. It has huge potential to improve cure rates and reduce the burden of toxicity on young cancer patients through better targeted chemotherapy, introducing advances in immunotherapy and using other evolving technologies.

Things about workplace well-being...
There is strong and growing evidence that work and health and wellbeing are closely and strongly linked and need to be addressed together. In June 2014, Public Health England (PHE) published a set of national standards for workplace health for the first time — the Workplace Wellbeing Charter which was developed with the charity Health@Work and Liverpool County Council and was based on their scheme and others from around the country.
This study 'Workplace Wellbeing CharterAnalysis of take-up and impact' investigates the take-up and impact of the WWC, maps available data on the number of organisations accredited with the Charter across England and provides insights into a diverse range of organisations that have invested in the well-being of staff in their workplaces.

Things about reading & refreshments...
The first meeting of our Reading Group will take place on Wednesday 3 May at 17:15 in the library for any SCH staff or parents of long-term patients - at this first meeting we will be choosing the books that we will be reading as we meet the first Wednesday of every month. Come along or contact us for further details.

Things to make...
Kate's choice this week 'Rhubarb & custard cake' which sounds easy and delicious.

Wednesday, 19 April 2017

Things in the library 21 April...

Things about fussy eating...
Fussy/picky eating – i.e. consistently avoiding certain foods – is common in childhood and can be worrisome for parents. Repeated exposure to various flavors as occurs in breastmilk and early exposure to complementary feeding may increase food acceptance and thereby decrease fussy eating. This study examines the associations between infant feeding and child fussy eating in 4779 participants of Generation R, a Dutch population-based cohort.  Results suggest that breastfeeding does not predict fussy eating. However, introducing vegetables into a child's diet before 5 months might be protective against fussy eating, although future research should account for parents' own fussy eating.

Things about growth & development...
This article "Postnatal growth in term infants born small for gestational age is associated with later neurocognitive and metabolic outcomes" systematically reviewed papers published in English between 1994 and October 2015 on how postnatal weight gain and growth affects neurodevelopment and metabolic outcomes in term-born small for gestational age (SGA) infants. Two randomised trials reported that enriched infant formulas that promoted early growth also increased fat mass, lean mass and blood pressure, but had no effect on early neurocognitive outcomes. Meanwhile, 31 observational studies reported consistent positive associations between postnatal weight gain and growth with neurocognitive outcomes, adiposity, insulin resistance and blood pressure. They concluded that few intervention studies exist, despite consistent positive associations between early growth and neurocognition in term-born SGA infants.

Things about social media...
A discussion paper entitled "Social Media Use and Children's Wellbeing" from University of Sheffield authors was shared on SSRN (SSRN is devoted to the rapid worldwide dissemination of research and is composed of a number of specialised research networks.) This research explores the effect of children's digital social networking on their subjective wellbeing. Using a large representative sample of 10-15 year olds over the period 2010 to 2014 from the UK Household Longitudinal Study, and estimating the effect of time spent chatting on social websites on a number of outcomes which reflect how these children feel about different aspects of their life, specifically: school work; appearance; family; friends; school attended; and life as a whole. Their results suggest that spending more time on social networks reduces the satisfaction that children feel with all aspects of their lives, except for their friendships; and that girls suffer more adverse effects than boys. As well as addressing policy makers' concerns about the effects of digital technology on children, this work also contributes to wider debates about the socioeconomic consequences of the internet and digital technologies more generally, a debate which to date has largely been based on evidence from outside of the UK.

Things about Case Reviews...
The National Guardian's Office (NGO) will launch a twelve month trial of its new case review process on 22 May. The case review will commend areas of good practice, where NHS staff have been supported to raise concerns. It will also provide where evidence of where inappropriate practice is found and recommendations to help foster a positive change in speaking up culture. After the twelve month trial period, the case review process will be reviewed and any necessary changes and improvements will be made. Information on how to submit a case for review will shortly be available on the National Guardian’s Office web pages. You can download a draft summary  of how the case review process will work or view the feedback received so far.

Bristol Safeguarding Children Board (BSCB) has published the report of the serious case review (SCR) into the death of a new mother and her four-day-old daughter. Key issues include: professionals lost focus on the unborn child, and appeared more focused on the needs of the mother who had mental health problems; professionals felt intimidated by an unpredictable and hostile service user, and became less confident in using their skills and expertise; the range of individual services working with pregnant women with mental ill-health made it difficult to coordinate multi-organisational working.

Things about adolescent health...
This study 'Educational Attainment at Age 10–11 Years Predicts Health Risk Behaviors and Injury Risk During Adolescence'  is based on life course theory, whereby low-educated individuals are exposed to cumulative disadvantage through socioeconomic adversity, chronic stress, and poor health lifestyles and environments, among other mechanisms. All those factors manifest over the long term and culminate in poorer health in late life. It was designed to contribute to this literature by examining the effect of educational attainment on adolescent health, using injury rates as a proxy for risk-taking behaviors. It concludes that "Interventions aimed at children with declining attainment in primary school could help to improve adolescent health."

Things about sleep...
The Sleep Copuncil's website has many interesting resources to help you get a better night's sleep. Including some 'nodcasts' for you to download they asked more than 2,000 people what sounds helped them to de-stress/get to sleep. Among the top answers were the sounds of birdsong, rain, thunder and lightning, waves and wind. So they have reproduced those sounds  for you to listen to whenever you need a soothing sound to help you off to sleep.

Something zingy...
Perhaps not the meal to eat just before bedtime but this Hot-smoked salmon salad with a chilli lemon dressing is lovely and fresh for spring after all the Easter chocolate, simnel cakes and hot-cross buns.







Thursday, 6 April 2017

Things in the library 7 April..

Things to read...
Our SCH Reading Group will be launching on Wed 3rd  May and the plan is to meet at 17:15 (5.15pm) on the first Wednesday of each month in the Illingworth Library. It will be an informal discussion of the books that we have read and if you are interested in coming along please email the library.

Things about medical training...
A new review from the GMC  'Adapting for the future' identifies five problems that create barriers to more flexible postgraduate UK medical training arrangements. These barriers result in training that is rigid, slow to adapt, and fixated with time and tick boxes.
They say"We will respond by taking specific actions, together with others, to realise our ambition for more transparency across specialties about outcomes. We want trainees to have clarity and confidence in what it will mean for them if they switch specialties. Equivalent training between related specialties will be recognised. This will improve efficiency by allowing doctors to transfer their skills more easily and to avoid repeating training. Patients and health services will benefit from having doctors who can care for patients with conditions that cross specialty and subspecialty boundaries." 


Things about child mental health...
Delivering mental health transformation for all children : Findings from engagement with the children and young people’s voluntary sector in Autumn 2016. this report has been published by the national Children's Bureau and  focuses on progress and challenges in improving children and young people’s mental health services in England, particularly for minority or vulnerable groups. It is based on the views of 49 professionals working with children and young people, primarily from the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector (VCSE).

Things for us to buy...
We will be sending off an order for new books soon so if you know of any resources that you think it would be useful for us to buy (books or e-books) then please contact us with your suggestions. If you are not sure what we already have access to then please check out our library catalogue on the internet. Don't forget there are also thousands of e-books that you can browse without charge for a few minutes and then request purchase if you think they would be a useful resource.

Things about preterm infants...
(c)https://www.massagemag.com/research-exclusive-massage-
improves-growth-quality-among-male-preterm-infants-12532/
A recent review article has looked at the evidence for the beneficial effects of massage on pre-term infants. The article reviews published randomized controlled trials on the effects of massage in preterm infants. Most studies evaluating the effect of massage in weight gain in premature infants suggest a positive effect on weight gain. Increase in vagal tone has been reported in infants who receive massage and has been suggested as a possible mechanism for improved weight gain. More studies are needed on the underlying mechanisms of the effects of massage therapy on weight gain in preterm infants. While some trials suggest improvements in developmental scores, decreased stress behavior, positive effects on immune system, improved pain tolerance and earlier discharge from the hospital, the number of such studies is small and further evidence is needed.

Things about Easter...
No blog next week as the library will be closed on Good Friday and Easter Monday and we will be closing at 5 pm the rest of that week.
If you don't like fruit cakes and so won't be making a  traditional Simnel cake then what about this Mary Berry alternative Cardamom and white chocolate sponge








Friday, 31 March 2017

Things in the library 31 March

Things about the internet...
The House of Lords Communications Committee has published a report looking at the issues and opportunities children face as they grow up with the internet. Recommendations to government include: establishing a Children’s Digital Champion to ensure coordinated and sustained action and to present robust advocacy on behalf of children to industry; minimum standards established for child-friendly design, content control filtering, privacy, data collection, terms and conditions of use; digital literacy should sit alongside reading, writing and arithmetic as the fourth pillar of a child’s education. Further information: Growing up with the internet

Things about South Yorkshire...
The Department for Education (DfE) has published an evaluation of the South Yorkshire empower and protect (SYEP) project, which aimed to provide young people experiencing sexual exploitation with ways to remain safely at home or in stable foster care locally. Findings include: some positive outcomes for a small number of young people; foster carers reported that training and support provided has made a difference to their ability to support challenging young people; evidence that key risk factors, including missing episodes, have been reduced and protective factors, including a positive relationship with at least one supportive adult and attending school or college, have been increased. Further information: South Yorkshire empower and protect child sexual exploitation innovation project: evaluation report 

Things about Sheffield...
Sheffield’s innovative approach to supporting children and young people’s emotional well-being and mental health known as ‘Sheffield Healthy Minds’ is to be rolled out to 40 additional schools from April 2017. This follows a successful pilot with 10 schools in Sheffield, which has been held up by NHS England as an example of good practice.The Sheffield Healthy Minds programme commissioned  by Sheffield Clinical Commissioning Group and Sheffield City Council and delivered by Sheffield Children’s NHS Foundation Trust’s Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS)  supports schools to develop a whole school approach to students emotional wellbeing –  through staff training, Healthy Minds surveys, developing PSHE materials, engaging Healthy Minds Champions and supporting staff in their understanding of good mental health and early help as well as  developing stronger links with CAMHS services.

Things about breastfeeding...
Almost three-quarters of women start breastfeeding when their child is born, but this drops to 44% within 6 to 8 weeks. Evidence shows the right support helps mums to breastfeed for longer. A new survey of 500 mothers of young children commissioned by PHE showed that more than half were concerned that breastfeeding could mean they wouldn’t be able to tell if their baby was getting too much or not enough milk. A similar proportion of mums surveyed thought that people might assume they need a special diet to breastfeed. Nearly 3 in 10 worried that breastfeeding could mean their baby might not be getting the right nutrients, indicating why mothers may stop breastfeeding at this early point. Start4Life, PHE’s marketing programme that helps parents-to-be and parents to adopt healthy behaviours, has launched a new interactive Breastfeeding Friend (BFF) ChatBot. The BFF is accessed through Facebook messenger and provides personal support for mothers at any time of the day or night to help make breastfeeding a better experience. The BFF will also dispel breastfeeding myths and help alleviate concerns mums have. The ChatBot works as a live chat tool which is able to respond to questions about breastfeeding posed by the user. To access the Breastfeeding BFF, simply open Facebook Messenger and search Start4Life BreastFeeding Friend or visit m.me/Start4LifeBreastFeedingFriend to get started.

Things to attend...
The next journal club will be on ​​Weds 5th April  8 -9 am in the Education and Skills Centre, F Floor, Stephenson Wing. Paper: Renal Scarring in the Randomized Intervention for Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux (RIVUR) Trial 

Things about children's safety...
The NSPCC report three recent commitments by the government which they believe will keep children safer.More details here.
- improving internet safety in the UK to ensure better protection for children online
- making Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) mandatory in all schools in England
- stopping plans that meant local authorities in England could gain exemption from children's social care law.

Things about sleep...
A survey by The Lullaby Trust shows more than half of parents still unsure how to sleep their baby safely A survey commissioned by charity The Lullaby Trust has found that over 55% of parents are unsure of the basic steps they can take to lower the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. The survey of 500 parents with children aged 0-2 years, found that while most are aware of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) there is confusion around one of the most fundamental steps to reduce the risk of SIDS: sleeping a baby on its back for every sleep.
The survey shows 38% of parents are unsure whether they can sleep a baby on their front and 55% are unsure whether to sleep a baby on their side. The survey results are a worrying indication that parents are still not equipped with the information they need to reduce the risk of SIDS. Evidence shows that babies who are slept on their back for every sleep are 6 times less likely to die from SIDS than those who sleep on their front or side.

Things about research...
Advancing child health research in the UK: the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health Infants’ Children's and Young People's Research Charter . This paper describes the development of the Research & Us Infants', Children's and Young People's Child Health Research Charter. It was developed with the engagement of children and young people through the RCPCH's & Us network, which is a large collaborative network enabling children, young people and parents and carers to have a voice in improving healthcare services and achieving better outcomes. The Charter was designed to support children, young people, their families and healthcare professionals in discussions about research issues.

Things to eat...
These recipes I spotted and they look like something I might try for Easter  - but I will practice first! I expect you can buy chocolate cups if you don't want to make them. Raspberry Chocolate cups and
Chocolate cups with mango.