Friday, 14 December 2018

Things in the library 14 Dec....

Things closed...
On Tuesday 18th December we will be closed all day as it is our "dust creating and pre-Christmas workout" day...otherwise known as Stocktaking Day. If you need to return books please use the book drop box situated outside the library and emails will be dealt with the following day.

Things about food allergies...
The aim of this review article in Nutrients is to summarise randomised studies that have investigated whether there is a time window for the early introduction of allergenic foods (both in infants at high-risk for atopy and in the general population) that could effectively prevent food allergy, ascertained by the diagnostic oral food challenge test. They conclude that  "In practice, during the first year of life, the child can progressively be introduced to all foods, according to his/her requirements and the ability to chew, keep head still and sit propped up. Allergenic foods that may be inhaled (i.e., nuts) because of immature oral motor skills, should be avoided or given in a form that is safe for infants, such as peanut butter."

For infants with food allergy and/or severe eczema "an oral food challenge under medical supervision, before introducing the food into the diet, should be considered. This should be taken into account not only for egg and peanut, but also for the other foods, including cow’s milk, tree nuts and seeds, which contain allergens resistant to heat, pH and enzymatic digestion and capable of sensitization via the oral route"

Things about poverty...
The Joseph Rowntree Foundation have published their Poverty UK 2018  report. The research focuses particularly on changes to poverty among children and workers, as well as giving an overview of trends among pensioners and other groups. This research reveals that, in our society:

  • Child poverty has been rising since 2011/12; 4.1 million children are living in poverty, a rise of 500,000 in the last five years; 
  • Four million workers are living in poverty –a rise of more than half a million over five years; and 
  • In-work poverty has been rising even faster than employment, driven almost entirely by increasing poverty among working parents. 

Things new...

A new selection of books has just arrived and will be available to borrow in the New Year. If there is something you fancy then by logging in to our online catalogue with your library reader number and PIN (ask us if you don't have one) you can reserve them - or contact the library.

Things to make...
Queen of puddingsAn old fashioned but lovely easy pudding I am making this weekend is 'Queen of Puddings'. I'm making mine from my mothers 1950's version of Good Housekeeping (which also includes instructions on managing kitchen staff!). This recipe from Mary Berry is virtually the same although the meringue never gets piped in our house ...just dolloped on top..and the jam (raspberry) has been known to come out of a jar!

Friday, 7 December 2018

Things in the library 7th Dec...

Things to read next year...
We had our reading Group Christmas party this week and spent most of the time choosing our reading for next year. If you have ever fancied joining us on (usually) the first Wed of every month at 17:15 in the library then please give us a try next year. We just chat about the book we have been reading and there are always drinks and nibbles available. Over Christmas we will be reading either (or both) of these: The night before Christmas by Nikolai Gogol or A Redbird Christmas by Fannie Flagg and discussing them at our meeting on January 9th (not the first Wednesday).

The books for the rest of the year are:
6th  Feb:  The Choice: Embrace the Possible by Edith Eger
6th Mar:  Murder of my aunt by Richard Hull
3rd Apr:  This is going to hurt: Secret diaries of a junior doctor by Adam Kay 
1st May:  Hold My Hand by M.J.Ford
5th Jun:  Mythos: The Greek Myths Retold by Stephen Fry 
3rd  Jul:  Spark of Light by Jodi Picoult 
7th Aug: The Librarian by Salley Vickers
4th Sep: tbc
2nd Oct:  Penguin Book of the Contemporary British Short Story   Philip Hensher (Ed.) (2018):
6th Nov:  The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton

Things about health in England...

The Health Survey for England (HSE) monitors trends in the nation’s health and care. It provides information about adults aged 16 and over, and children aged 0 to 15, living in private households in England. The survey is used to monitor overweight and obesity and to estimate the proportion of people in England who have certain health conditions and the prevalence of risk factors and health related behaviours, such as smoking and drinking alcohol.
The survey consists of an interview, followed by a visit from a nurse who takes some measurements and blood and saliva samples. Adults and children aged 13 to 15 were interviewed in person, and parents of children aged 0 to 12 answered on behalf of their children for many topics. Children aged 8 to 15 filled in a self-completion booklet about their drinking and smoking behaviour.
There are various summaries available online - one of the key facts is that only 18% of children had the recommended 5+ portions of fruit and veg daily

Some things West African...


At The Workstation, on 13 Dec The University of Sheffield and Zongo Music present The Calabash: A celebration of West African film, live music, art and culture. Free entry but you can register in advance
7pm: African Bazaar - traditional African wares on sale. Bar opens.
8pm: Join Dr Afua Twum-Danso Imoh (School of Sociological Studies) in the premiere of her documentary film, 'Growing up colonial on the Gold Coast (Ghana)'shot in Ghana, West Africa to explore her British Academy-funded research into a 'proper' childhood for colonised subjects in the Gold Coast. Includes Q&A.
8.30pm onwards: Live acoustic music and DJ set and Spoken Word and Poetry

Things about future health...
From the Health Foundation a report A Place to Grow: Exploring the future health of young people in five sites across the UK. the key points are below.

  •  In five UK towns and cities, the Young People’s Future Health Inquiry team listened to the perspectives of young people and youth organisations about access to the assets needed for a healthy transition into adulthood.
  • Our visits uncovered common themes and a strong sense of place, shaping the young people’s identity and how they described themselves. 
  • But young people’s access to the opportunities and relationships that can ensure a healthy future varies across the UK.
  • Young people are profoundly affected by the nature of their local economy, housing and labour markets, and by the strength of the social fabric around them
Things about loneliness...
Office for National StatisticsFrom the Office of National Statistics a report on Children’s and young people’s experiences of loneliness: 2018. This analysis of children's and young people’s views, experiences and suggestions to overcome loneliness, using in-depth interviews, the Community Life Survey 2016 to 2017 and Good Childhood Index Survey, 2018.

Things to eat...
I can't comment on its authenticity but this Spicy African stew should definitely warm you up this weekend.



Friday, 30 November 2018

Things in the library 30 Nov...

Things just about over...
Hopefully most of the 104 participants of our randomised Coffee trial have now had chance to meet. The feedback form is now available (please don't try to open it in Internet Explorer). Some people have already told us how it went for them but we need as many responses as possible please so we can decide if we should run it again or not.

Things in the news...

Today is the news that the NHS is to offer 800-calorie diet treatment for newly developed Type 2 diabetes. Click here if you want to read the original research paper from the Lancet and here for the NHS statement.

Things for next year...
Image result for christmas readingOur last Reading Group of the year meets next Wednesday (5th Dec) at 17:15 we will be choosing our reading for next year, sampling some seasonal food & drink and sharing some Winter/Christmas readings/poems. If you have wondered about joining us this would be a great chance to drop in and see who we are and what we are planning to read.




Things about mental health...

One in eight (12.8%) of children and young people aged between five and 19, surveyed in England in 2017, had a mental disorder according to a major new report which provides England’s best source of data on trends in child mental health. Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017, published this week by NHS Digital, collected information from 9,117 children and young people and combines information - depending on their age - from children and young people or their parents and teachers.

For the first time, the survey has covered children aged two to 19, whereas previous surveys have focused only on the five to 15-year-old age group.

Looking at the five to 15-year-old age group over time, the report reveals a slight increase in the overall prevalence of mental disorder. For this age group, this has risen from 9.7% in 1999 and 10.1% in 2004 to 11.2% in 20172. When including five to 19-year-olds, the 2017 prevalence is 12.8%, but this cannot be compared to earlier years.

Mental disorders were grouped into four broad categories - emotional, behavioural, hyperactivity and other less common disorders.
Emotional disorders have become more common in five to 15-year-olds – going from 4.3% in 1999, to 3.9% in 2004 to 5.8% in 2017.
Different disorders were found to be more or less common at different stages of childhood, with rates of mental disorder higher in older age groups.

and also...
Anne Longfield, the Children’s Commissioner for England, has published new analysis looking at the provision of children’s mental health services in England. The Commissioner’s briefing finds that Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) are improving in most areas in the country, yet with the exception of eating disorder services, the provision of services in the youth justice system and in perinatal mental health care, the rate of progress is slow. A vast gap remains between what is provided and what children need. As a result, the current rate of progress is still not good enough for the majority of children who require help but are not receiving it.

Things for the family...
At Weston Park Museum (across the road from the hospital) is a Christmas festive factory on Saturday 8th Dec from 12:00 to 15:00. Join them for some festive fun in their hands-on creative activities for the whole family. Get into the festive spirit as you create Christmas crafts to decorate your home – or even to give away as presents!



Things vegetarian...
This potato, onion, sage and gruyère tart sounds nice - I think fresh sage is my favourite herb - and a good way to use up left over potatoes!







Friday, 23 November 2018

Things in the library 23 Nov...

Things about coffee...

Our Randomised Coffee Trial is well under way with many 'partners' having already met for a chat and there is some interest in running another one in the New Year. If you haven't yet met your partner don't worry - you still have time - ideally before the end of November but it doesn't matter if it is later than that. I will be sending out a very short anonymous form next Friday for feedback so we can find out how people feel about the project.

Things to attend...

Journal Club next week is on Thursday 29 November 8 am to 9 am in Education and Skills Centre, F Floor, Grey Lifts. The paper being discussed is "Outcome of fetuses with prenatal diagnosis of isolated severe bilateral ventriculomegaly: systematic review and meta-analysis"  SCH staff may contact us if you want a copy of the paper.

Things available...

We have available, free to anyone in SCH, a metal book trolley and four small tables which can be used singly or configured into various combinations (shown as hexagons) for Trust use only. Please contact us if you are interested.










Things about discipline...

Paediatricians are a source of advice for parents and guardians concerning the management of child behavior, including discipline strategies that are used to teach appropriate behaviour and protect their children and others from the adverse effects of challenging behaviour. Aversive disciplinary strategies, including all forms of corporal punishment and yelling at or shaming children, are minimally effective in the short-term and not effective in the long-term. With new evidence, researchers link corporal punishment to an increased risk of negative behavioural, cognitive, psychosocial, and emotional outcomes for children. In this Policy Statement, the American Academy of Pediatrics provides guidance for paediatricians and other child health care providers on educating parents about positive and effective parenting strategies of discipline for children at each stage of development as well as references to educational materials. This statement supports the need for adults to avoid physical punishment and verbal abuse of children.

Things about backpacks...

Backpack loads of school students during school days have been suggested to range from 10% to as high as 25% of their body weight and may have a negative impact on their body. The aim of this review was to identify and review studies that have examined impacts of contemporary backpack loads on school children.

Backpacks worn by children should be well-designed, appropriately adjusted and worn over both shoulders to balance out the weight. Heavy satchels and shoulder bags are best avoided.

Things to make...
If you are fed up with hearing about Black Friday  and want a more personalised gift to make this year there are some lovely ideas here . I think I might need to road test some of them before Christmas!










Friday, 16 November 2018

Things in the library 16 Nov...#

Things about instant messaging...
New guidance for the NHS will help doctors, nurses and other staff use instant messaging safely to co-ordinate patients’ care during emergencies.
Medics have turned to communication channels such as Whatsapp to deal with emergency situations like the Croydon tram crash, Grenfell Tower fire and terrorist attacks in London Bridge and Manchester Arena. The "Information governance considerations for staff on the use of instant messaging software in acute clinical settings"  guidance will help NHS organisations and staff to make a judgement on how and when to use instant messaging safely in acute clinical settings, taking in to account data sharing and data privacy rules.
Simple steps that staff should take include:

  • Only using apps and other messaging tools that meet the NHS encryption standard
  • Not allowing anyone else to use their device
  • Disabling message notifications on their device’s lock-screen to protect patient confidentiality
  • Keeping separate clinical records and delete the original messaging notes once any advice has been transcribed and attributed in the medical record.


Things about babies...
This report from  Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists presents key findings and recommendations based on the analysis of data from 2016 relating to the care given to mothers and babies throughout the UK, to ensure each baby receives the safest possible care during labour. Each Baby Counts: 2018 progress report

Things about health inequality...
The Institute of Health Equity report A Fair, Supportive Society highlights that some of the most vulnerable people in society – those with learning disabilities – will die 15-20 years sooner on average than the general population – that’s 1,200 people every year. The report commissioned by NHSE highlights key facts, stats, and interventions. Much of the government action needed to improve life expectancy for people with disabilities is likely to reduce health inequalities for everyone. Action should focus on the ‘social determinants of health’, particularly addressing poverty, poor housing, discrimination and bullying.

Things about painting pigs...

Schools across Yorkshire & Humber, Derbyshire, Lincolnshire, Nottinghamshire and beyond are invited every year to submit pupils’ art work for a competition to celebrate Chinese New Year! It is the school who organises pupils to create an A4-sized picture of Chinese Zodiac of the Year that is inspired by China.
The school makes a judgement on 1st, 2nd and 3rd winners per category and submits these winners' artwork.
Overall Winners across the same category are judged by the Confucius Institute.

Things about Gluten free food on prescription...
The DHSC held a public consultation on seeking views on proposed changes to gluten-free (GF) Prescribing Regulations and has now published its response.




Things to make...
This Spanish meatball & butter bean stew is a really nice gluten-free dish and it does freeze well.

****Update on the last week's baking...it worked ok but the madeleines were not as good as my usual recipe  - stick with simple!****

Friday, 9 November 2018

Things in the library 9th November...

Things about millennium children...

The Centre for Mental Health and UCL’s Institute of Education have published a report 'Children of the Millennium' which finds that one child in every twelve in the UK has behavioural problems from a young age into their teenage years, putting them at risk of a lifetime of disadvantage and poor health. Children with persistent problems are much more likely to have a multitude of risks early in life, including poverty and housing insecurity, parental mental illness and developmental delay.

The project focused on the analysis of pathways of conduct problems during childhood, comparing the pathways by gender; the impact of multiple risks over time; and pathways of conduct disorder for children with multiple mental health difficulties.
As a result of this work, they are calling for:

  • Concerted action across government to reduce the risk of severe and persistent behavioural problems
  • Government to seek to reduce child poverty and housing insecurity
  • The NHS to continue to boost mental health support to new parents
  • Local authorities to get the funding they need to boost early years services such as Sure Start and to offer evidence-based parenting programmes to families with the greatest needs.
Things about babies and expectant mothers... 

Progress on stillbirths and neonatal and infant mortality has slowed down in the UK in recent years. This explainer from Nuffield Trust looks at the possible reasons why, and what can be done about it.

Things about the High Street...
The Royal Society for Public Health has a new report  'Health on the High Street: Running on Empty 2018' as part of its campaign to offer practical guidance for local authorities and members of the public who want to make their high streets more health-promoting. Their research looked at the health impact of a range of high street outlets – extending their 2015 analysis to include vape shops, convenience stores, off-licences, cafes, and empty shops – and used this measure to rank Britain’s major towns and cities by the impact of their high streets on the public’s health and wellbeing.
A key finding was around the proliferation of empty shops on Britain’s high streets – their clustering in more deprived areas, and the negative impact they can have on community wellbeing and spirit, representing a decline in community assets. 

Things about reading group...
We have just finished reading 'The Turn of the Screw' and our next meeting on Wed 5th December at 17:15 we are sharing Winter / Christmas poems or short extracts accompanied by seasonal drinks & mince pies. We will also be choosing our reading for the next few months – please email your suggestions in advance.

Things about children...
The University of Sheffield has published a series of policy briefings on working against the challenges faced by children and ensuring they have the best possible chances in life. The four policy briefings cover: the effectiveness of early intervention; single parent families; the role of voluntary organisations in supporting and monitoring young carers; the services provided for young people leaving care.
Things about keeping unwell children out of hospital...
As part of the King's Fund series 'Practical approaches to delivering better value in the NHS' this blog is from a paediatrician at Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.  'Better value and a better night's sleep: keeping acutely unwell children and adults out of hospital'  discusses their concept of a ‘virtual hospital’ that adds value by both improving quality (using patient experience and outcomes as key indicators) and reducing costs.

Things to make...
Seeing as the winner of Great British Bake off was a University of Sheffield researcher I thought we ought to have one of his recipes...one of the easier ones! I hope to try this one for chocolate-dipped orange madeleines at the weekend so fingers crossed! 

 



Friday, 2 November 2018

Things in the library 2 Nov...

Things to stitch...
According to this report there are some who are concerned that the newest surgical recruits are not as dexterous as former surgeons due to having less experience in doing craftwork. I'm sure our surgeons all sew beautifully...but perhaps we should start an embroidery group in the library along with our reading group!

Things about Quality of Life...
Quality of life (QOL) measures are increasingly used when important prognostication and treatment decisions need to be made in the care of a critically ill child. Unfortunately, health-care professionals and families experience difficulties when attempting to accurately predict and estimate QOL for a patient. Aspects such as subjectivity, complexity and adaptation to illness play an important role in how QOL is ultimately experienced. This often leads to inaccurate estimates of QOL, when performed by individuals other than the patient, such as clinicians or family members. In order to make decisions in the best interest of the patient, a partnership between families and clinicians must be fostered, based on communication, trust and mutual understanding of values. This article in Paediatric Respiratory Reviews attempts to describe some of the challenges that come into play when assessing QOL for a patient and will provide tools for building a clinician-family partnership in the decision-making process.

Things about air pollution...
This WHO report summarises the latest scientific knowledge on the links between exposure to air pollution and adverse health effects in children. It is intended to inform and motivate individual and collective action by health care professionals to prevent damage to children’s health from exposure to air pollution. Air pollution is a major environmental health threat. Exposure to fine particles in both the ambient environment and in the household causes about seven million premature deaths each year. Ambient air pollution (AAP) alone imposes enormous costs on the global economy, amounting to more than US$ 5 trillion in total welfare losses in 2013.

The evidence is clear: air pollution has a devastating impact on children’s health.
says the report

Recent data released by the World Health Organization (WHO) show that air pollution has a vast and terrible impact on child health and survival. Globally, 93% of all children live in environments with air pollution levels above the WHO guidelines. More than one in every four deaths of children under 5 years is directly or indirectly related to environmental risks.

Although air pollution is a global problem, the burden of disease attributable to particulate matter in air is heaviest in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), particularly in the WHO African, South-East Asia, Eastern Mediterranean and Western Pacific regions. Poverty is correlated with high exposure to environmental health risks.

Things about conversations...
This Ask Listen Do resource shares tips for health, social care and education organisations and practitioners with the aim of making feedback, concerns and complaints easier for people with a learning disability, autistic people, families and carers.





Things about nature...
It is commonly believed that nature has positive impacts on children’s health, including physical, mental and social dimensions. This review focuses on how accessibility to, exposure to and engagement with nature affects the mental health of children and teenagers. This review showed significant positive findings on the benefits of nature for all mental health outcomes; however, ADD/ADHD, overall mental health, stress, resilience and HRQOL were the only outcomes that demonstrated more positive significant findings over non-significant findings. Several outcomes (emotional well-being, self-esteem, depression) were associated with a greater number of non-significant findings than positive significant findings, supporting the inconclusive nature of the evidence reported in previous reviews. The authors believe that "By prioritising investments of natural spaces at all levels of government as well as within school districts, children have a better chance of receiving the benefits of interacting with nature."

Things about C*********...
Reluctant as I am to do things Christmassy this early in the year I spotted on the webpage for Weston Park Gallery (across the road from the hospital) that this December, they’ll once again transform the Arctic World gallery into Santa’s North Pole ho-ho-home. You can take the family along to meet the man himself, who’ll be there with a warm welcome, quality presents and plenty of Christmas cheer. To make the visit to see Santa stress-free they have a new online booking – just pick the day and timeslot that suits you £7 per child.

Things Roman...
A little bit more grown up and if archaeology interests you then there is a lunchtime talk at Weston Museum on Tuesday 27 November on Roman finds in Yorkshire. Ranging from evidence of military activity and the cult of Mithras, to the personal grooming habits of the Romans, and coin hoards and monumental statues, this talk will highlight some of the most interesting Roman finds from Yorkshire that have been recorded by the Portable Antiquities Scheme, and use them to illustrate a brief history of the Roman period in Yorkshire.

Things to eat...
I am hosting a bonfire party for 26 people ranging in age from 8 weeks to 86 years this Saturday...so hope it doesn't rain! So with jacket potatoes on my mind and apparently it being World Vegan Month in November here is a nice sounding recipe for Vegan chickpea curry jacket sweet potatoes.