Friday, 15 June 2018

Things in the library 15th June...

Things about ADHD...
A recent article in 'Child's Nervous System' looked at whether there is an association between mild head injury (MHI) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms in preschool children. That preschool children with MHI have more pre-injury ADHD symptoms and oppositional and emotional-behavioural symptoms than healthy children without trauma. Clinicians should screen children with MHI for ADHD symptoms and refer them for treatment when necessary. Evaluation of children presenting with MHI by a child psychiatrist may prevent repetition of injuries.

Things from the Children's commissioner...

The report, ‘Public Spending on Children in England: 2000 to 2020’, shows that levels of government spending on children have been broadly maintained over the last twenty years. However, the analysis also reveals a number of deeply concerning trends, with mainstream and acute services, such as 4-16 education and support for children in care, protected at the expense of targeted preventative services. Almost half of spending on children’s services now goes on 73,000 children in the care system, while the other half has to cover the remaining 11.7 million children in England. Altogether, 72% of children’s services budgets go towards helping families in severe need.
The report shows there has been a significant reorientation of spending in recent years towards statutory help for children in crisis, while overall children’s services spending has been largely frozen since 2009–10. Spending on preventative support, such as Sure Start and young people’s services, has consequently been cut by around 60% in real-terms between 2009–10 and 2016–17.

Things about NHS70...
The University of Sheffield is holding an exhibition and activity event on Thurs 5 July 11am-7pm Sheffield Cathedral forecourt. There will lots of hands-on activities and demos from healthcare organisations across the city, including stands focusing on Sheffield's contribution the development of medical research and clinical trials. There will be activities for all ages including healthcare robots, taking the carbohydrate challenge, using computer models to measure our body’s movements, finding out how our hearts works, the chance to explore a vintage ambulance and much more.

Things about preterm children...
Preterm Children Have Higher Risk Than Full-term Children of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease During the First 2 Years of Life according to a recent publication in Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal






Things about winter...
Yes I know summer has finally arrived but NHS Confederation has been looking the pressures on the NHS...which are not just in winter. Their report System under strain is available online







Things about transforming care...
Transforming care is built on principles that put the child, young person or adult and their family and community at the centre.  Sometimes this can be hard to achieve if someone’s particular needs do not fit into services which already exist. This case study looks at Josh, who has a learning disability and autism, and how transforming care helped to bring him home to live with his family in Cornwall.

Things about migration...

From next Tuesday 23 June the Migration Matters Festival will be taking place over five days across Sheffield. Migration Matters is an annual Sheffield festival that runs during national Refugee Week. Events take place in city centre and community venues, uniting Sheffield’s communities and cultures. Sheffield was the UK’s first City of Sanctuary and it is a city that is made vibrant by its diversity and interconnecting cultures. Last year’s festival saw thousands of people enjoy events including: theatre, film, music, fashion, installation, talks and food events. It includes a photography exhibition 'Hidden Voices: The Health Experiences of Migrant Children' at Theatre Deli (202 Eyre Street) - no booking required.

Things to eat...
Fancy a bit of baking?  Well these polenta cupcakes are easy and quick and make the most of seasonal strawberries.

Friday, 8 June 2018

Things in the library 8th June...

Things about obesity...
The House of Commons Health Committee has published a report which states that current estimates suggest that nearly a third of children aged 2 to 15 are overweight or obese in the UK and younger generations are becoming obese at earlier ages and staying obese for longer. Obesity rates are highest for children from the most deprived areas and this situation is getting worse. Children aged 5 and from the poorest income groups are twice as likely to be obese compared to their most well-off counterparts and by age 11 they are three times as likely. The case for stronger action on this unacceptable and widening health inequality is compelling. The Government is expected to publish shortly a refreshed version of the childhood obesity plan first published in summer 2016. This report outlines the following key areas which demand attention as a matter of urgency by the Government before the next chapter of the plan is finalised: A ‘whole systems’ approach; Marketing and advertising; Price promotions; Early years and schools; Takeaways; Fiscal measures; Labelling and Services for children living with obesity.

Things about child sexual abuse and adverse experiences...

The Department of Health and Social Care have published a report which sets out current knowledge on trauma-informed care approaches to child sexual abuse and child sexual exploitation. It includes personal case studies and recommendations for a trusted relationship model.
They have also published a report about adverse childhood experiences which presents key findings from a study that aimed to
describe: the development and piloting of the Implementation Pack; practitioner views of the Implementation Pack; and practitioner (and where possible client) views on REACh (Routine Enquiry about Adversity in Childhood

Things about Lycra...
An article not on the fashion pages but in European Journal of Paediatric Neurology! Lycra garments have recently been used for children with cerebral palsy, with favourable effects on alignment, biomechanics and neuromuscular activity. An immediate improvement of static balance was observed at baseline, with the first use of the Lycra suit. Further improvement was observed at the 6 month follow up, with a statistical significance for the parameters assessing the antero–posterior axis. Both parents and children also reported functional benefits.

Things to do briskly...
Moderate intensity physical activity means getting the heart rate up and breathing faster. Just 10 minutes of brisk walking a day is an easy way for adults to introduce more moderate intensity physical activity into their day and reduce their risk of early death by up to 15%. To help adults do this, Public Health Englands’s ‘Active 10’ app has been created and it is the only app of its kind that combines intensity and time, rather than just distance.

Things about neonates...
An article on the effects of music on hospitalised preterm neonates was published in January (Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology. 2018 Jan 24;ePub ahead of print) and Evidence-based Neonatology have recently reviewed it and their commentary concludes:
With recent evidence suggesting that preterm neonates may be suffering from sensory deprivation, this review complements previous evidence in suggesting that music therapy may moderate the effects of preterm birth on neurodevelopment. However further investigation through well-designed and adequately powered RCTs, which give appropriate consideration to the nature of the musical stimuli provided, will be essential in establishing the short- and long-term effectiveness and safety of this intervention.
Things about children's eating behaviour...
A review article in 'Nutrients'  looks at the relevant factors involved in the creation of some children’s food preferences and eating behaviours in order to highlight the topic and give paediatricians practical instruments to understand the background behind eating behaviour and to manage children’s nutrition for preventive purposes. In this analysis, parental food habits and feeding strategies are the most dominant determinants of a child’s eating behaviour and food choices. Parents should expose their offspring to a range of good food choices while acting as positive role models. Prevention programmes should be addressed taking into account socioeconomic aspects and education.

Things about peregrines...
If you want to find out more about the University of Sheffield's peregrines then book a free place on their Sheffield Peregrine Evening Thu 14 June  18:00 – 20:30 their will be a chance to view the adults and fledglings from the Churchyard (please bring binoculars, if possible. A few pairs will be available to borrow.) followed by talks (in St George's Church Lecture Theatre).

Things to eat...
Make the most of rhubarb at the moment - and what better than a crumble











Friday, 25 May 2018

Things in the library 25 May...

Things you might not see again...
If you use the Illingworth Library and receive a notification each time the Blog is published and wish to continue receiving these, please make sure you opt in to our mailing list - if you haven't also done so - by following this link.
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Things about Dept of Health...
The Department of Health and Social Care has set out its objectives and how it will deliver them. The full report can be read here. Their objectives are:
  • Keep people healthy and support economic productivity and sustainable public services
  • Transform primary, community and social care to keep people living more independent, healthier lives for longer in their community
  • Support the NHS to deliver high quality, safe and sustainable hospital care and secure the right workforce
  • Support research and innovation to maximise health and economic productivity
  • Ensure accountability of the health and care system to Parliament and the taxpayer; and create an efficient and effective DHSC
  • Create value (reduced costs and growing income) by promoting better awareness and adoption of good commercial practice across the DHSC and our arm’s length bodies
Things about health and greenspace...
The Department of Landscape and Improving Wellbeing through Urban Nature (IWUN) project invites you to the fifth seminar of the 2017/18 'Health in Place' seminar series. In the fifth of this series of seminars, Dr Paul Brindley IWUN, University of Sheffield discusses the relationship between urban greenspace and general health. The seminar will take place:
Date: Tuesday 12 June 2018
Time: 4pm-5pm
Venue: ICOSS Conference room, University of Sheffield, S1 4DP
There has been a growing body of research exploring the health benefits of greenspace. Most, however, treat all urban greenspaces as the same and does not explore distinctions between types of greenspace. In our presentation they will explore the health benefits associated with (1) domestic gardens; (2) landscape metrics (measures that quantify specific spatial characteristics of areas of land, i.e. exploring the configuration of space); (3) trees and areas of woodland; and (4) the differing 'quality' of publicly accessible urban greenspace. Their work includes innovative techniques to explore the potential of quality measures extracted from social media (including Twitter and Flickr data).

Things about Quality...
The BMJ in partnership with and funded by The Health Foundation are launching a joint series of papers exploring how to improve the quality of healthcare delivery. The series aims to discuss the evidence for systematic quality improvement, provide knowledge and support to clinicians and ultimately to help improve care for patients.

Things about physical & mental health...
A new collaborative to support the physical health of people with a mental illness is being created following models in New Zealand & Australia. The Centre for Mental Health, Kaleidoscope and Rethink Mental Illness are working together with support from the Royal College of GPs and the Royal College of Psychiatrists to create an Equally Well collaborative here in the UK. They want to bring together health and care providers, commissioners, professional bodies, service user and carer organisations, charities and many more, working nationally or locally, to form a collaborative in the UK to bring about equal physical health for people with a mental illness.
They plan in their first year to:
  • Co-produce a Charter for Equal Health, setting out the shared principles, aims and objectives of Equally Well in the UK
  • Develop a web resource to provide up-to-date information, briefings and case studies
  • Bring together organisations that become part of Equally Well for a national event to share good practice and agree priorities for the future
Things about patient information...
The Patient Information Forum are  holding an event on the Perfect Patient Information Journey on Thursday 28 June 2018 in London. Draft agenda for the day and the link for booking.This event will include the launch of the final report of their Perfect Patient Information Journey project



Things about obesity...
An meta-analysis and systematic review in 'Obesity Reviews' was published this week which looks at 'Maintenance interventions for overweight or obesity in children'. In summary, this review shows that, although there is limited quality data to recommend one maintenance intervention over another, continued treatment does have a stabilizing effect on BMI-Z-score. Considering the magnitude of the problem of childhood obesity, this is an important finding that highlights the need for further research on weight loss maintenance.

Things about opening hours...
Next week we will be closed on the bank holiday Monday and then closing at 5pm the rest of the week due to staff annual leave. Mine will be spent working on the nearly finished extension and so will soon be able to return to 'proper' cooking!






Things to eat...
I am looking forward to being able to cook pieces of meat that are bigger than my microwave so this Greek roast lamb is likely to make an appearance before too long. Perfect with a green salad and feta cheese.












Friday, 18 May 2018

Things in the library 18 May...

Things about journal club...
Tuesday 22 May 1 - 2pm Venue: Education and Skills Centre, F Floor, Grey Lifts.
Paper: "Preschool children who are frequent attenders in emergency departments: an observational study of associated demographics and clinical characteristics."
Journal Club is open to all health professionals and is a fun, informal way of learning to criticise papers and gather evidence to change practice. At each meeting a speaker presents a critical appraisal of a research paper, using a recognised appraisal tool such as CASP.Group members then have an informal discussion to determine whether or not current practice should be altered in light of the presenter's findings...there are drinks & muffins too!

Things about bullying...
The Journal of Medical Internet Research recently published  a study which aims  to systematically review the current evidence examining the association between cyberbullying involvement as victim or perpetrator and self-harm and suicidal behaviors in children and young people (younger than 25 years), and where possible, to meta-analyze data on the associations. 


Things about obesity...
The All-Party Parliamentary Group on Obesity launched its inquiry findings 'The current landscape of obesity services' on 15th May 2018. 
Key findings of the report: 

  • 88% of people with obesity who took part in the survey have been stigmatised, criticised or abused as a result of their obesity.
  • 94% of all respondents believe that there is not enough understanding about the causes of obesity amongst the public, politicians and other stakeholders.
  • 42% of people with obesity did not feel comfortable talking to their GP about their obesity.
  • More than one third of people with obesity who completed the survey stated that they have not accessed any lifestyle or prevention services. 
The report makes a number of recommendations, including: 
  • A national obesity strategy for both adult and childhood obesity should be developed and implemented by the Government, with input from key stakeholders. This should look to strengthen existing services and replicate best practice across the country.
  • Obesity/weight management training should be introduced into medical school syllabuses to ensure GPs and other healthcare practitioners feel able and comfortable to raise and discuss a person’s weight, without any stigma or discrimination.
  • The Government should implement a 9pm watershed on advertising of food and drinks high in fat, sugar and salt to protect children during family viewing time.
  • The Government should lead or support efforts by the clinical community to investigate whether obesity should be classified as a disease in the UK, and what this would mean for the NHS and other services.
  • The Government should commission or support the development of a thorough, peer-reviewed cost benefit analysis of earlier intervention and treatment of people with obesity.


Things about FGM...
The World Health Organisation (WHO) has published a clinical handbook on the 'Care of girls and women living with female genital mutilation (FGM)'. The Handbook offers advice on how to: communicate effectively and sensitively with girls who have developed health issues due to FGM; work with patients and families to prevent the practice of FGM; and identify when and where to refer patients who need additional support and care.






Things not about 'that' wedding...
It's very gratifying that the whole country is helping me celebrate my wedding anniversary tomorrow...but if you want a more useful type of bunting have a go at these bunting biscuits!








Friday, 11 May 2018

Things in the library 11 May...

An image of the shop showing reusable coffee cupsThings without plastic...
The University of Sheffield Student Union (just down the road) has opened a ground-breaking new shop dedicated to waste-free goods. The Zero Waste Shop sells a huge variety of herbs, spices, nuts, cereals and grains along with household goods, all of which are free from plastic packaging. The outlet also stocks a range of sustainable everyday products including recycled kitchen roll, biodegradable refuse sacks and bamboo cutlery and kitchenware. There is also a refill station where you can fill up bottles with household essentials including soap, laundry detergent and surface cleaner. Cheaper and better for the environment, refilling is a great alternative to buying a new plastic bottle every time you run out of these items. Products are sold by weight, so you can buy as much or as little as you need. Take your own container, pick up a recyclable paper bag, or invest in a reusable jar or lunchbox from the wide range on offer in the shop. We are all welcome to use it - not just for University staff or students.

Things about obesity...
2020health’s third report on obesity since 2014 highlights that strong and mandated central policy, supporting bold, holistic local action, is still needed to impact what is arguably the greatest health challenge of the 21st century. Tackling obesity - What the UK can learn from other countries (Matt James, Dr Aaron Parkhurst and Jon Paxman) examines topical obesity intervention strategies from around the world to frame the question: can the UK learn from policy abroad?



Things about news items...
In the news last week was a report stating that bath oils for childhood eczema provide 'no clinical benefit'. When you hear items like this and want to know what the article referred to really said and see an appraisal of the research then go to the NHS behind the headlines site. Where the following points will be covered.

  • Where did the story come from?
  • What kind of research was this?
  • What did the research involve?
  • What were the basic results?
  • How did the researchers interpret the results?
  • Conclusion
Things across the road...
Take a step back in time and come along to Weston Park May Fayre on Sunday 20th May for a wonderful nostalgic day out with all of your family! Enjoy live traditional and contemporary music from the restored Victorian bandstand. The event is free and there will be lots of attractions and entertainment between 11am and 5pm to suit all of the family including: Carousel, Helter-Skelter and Children’s Rides, Artisan Crafts Marquee, Classic and Vintage Cars, Victorian Characters, Children’s Art and Craft Activities, Food and Refreshment Stalls and much more…

Things to top your toast...
Here are six toast toppings for spring brunch eating and none takes more than 10 minutes to make. 






Friday, 4 May 2018

Things in the library 4th May...

Things about robots...
Nesta has published Confronting Dr Robot: creating a people-powered future for AI in health.  This report explores how artificial intelligence (AI) might be used in the UK, how AI-enabled healthcare might look and feel and suggests what can be done to maximise benefits and minimise harm.  The report argues there is currently a window of opportunity to put in place measures that ensure the technology develops into 'People Powered AI'; supporting care that is simple, gives patients control, is centred around an equal dialogue, is accountable and equitable.



Things about obesity...
An article in Obesity Reviews discusses "Effects of multidisciplinary interventions on weight loss and health outcomes in children and adolescents with morbid obesity." The influence of age, gender and family participation on health outcomes and intensive treatment alternatives are explored. They conclude that there is not a 'one-size-fits-all' treatment approach, and matched care to personal needs is preferable. The integration of a chronic care approach is critical for the successful adaption of sustainable health behaviours.

Things to be reading...
Our next reading group will be on Wednesday 6th June at 17:15. We will be discussing 'The Museum of Extraordinary Things' by Alice Hoffman.
Coralie Sardie is the daughter of the impresario behind The Museum of Extraordinary Things, a Coney Island boardwalk freak show that amazes and stimulates the crowds. An exceptional swimmer, Coralie appears as the Mermaid in her father's “museum,” alongside performers like the Wolfman, the Butterfly Girl, and a one-hundred-year-old turtle. One night Coralie stumbles upon a striking young man photographing moonlit trees in the woods off the Hudson River.
Everyone welcome (whether you've read the book or not!) Come and join our informal discussion. Refreshments will be served.

Things to attend...


The next Journal club will be on Thursday 10th May 8.00 am - 9.00 am, in the Education and Skills Centre, F Floor, Stephenson Wing. The paper can be requested from the library.
Paper:​ Motivational Interviewing and Dietary Counseling for Obesity in Primary Care: An RCT 
Journal Club is open to all health professionals and is a fun, informal way of learning to criticize papers and gather evidence to change practice. At each meeting a speaker presents a critical appraisal of a research paper, using a recognised appraisal tool such as CASP. Group members then have an informal discussion to determine whether or not current practice should be altered in light of the presenter's findings.  Muffins and drinks provided.

Things to ponder...
A couple of editorials you might like to read in Acta Paediatrica "Identifying the cause and preventing childhood deaths"   and  "Promoting short-term and long-term health: keep the growth track!" 





Things about Literacy and life expectancy...

The National Literacy Trust has produced an evidence review exploring the link between literacy and life expectancy in England through health and socioeconomic factors. This report explores existing research from a wide range of sources, including longitudinal data and analysis, academic journals, and domestic and international surveys, to establish the depth of the relationship between literacy and life expectancy.
The report found that children born into communities with the most serious literacy challenges have some of the lowest life expectancies in England:
A boy born in Stockton Town Centre (which has some of the most serious literacy challenges in the country) has a life expectancy 26.1 years shorter than a boy born in North Oxford (which has some of the fewest literacy challenges)
A girl born in Queensgate, Burnley (which has some of the most serious literacy challenges in the country), has a life expectancy 20.9 years shorter than a girl born in Mayfield, Wealdon (which has some of the fewest literacy challenges)
They conclude: This report demonstrates the extreme gravity of local inequality and makes the challenge to close the literacy gap between communities. By closing gaps in education, employment and health at a local level, we can ensure that every child has the chance to live a happy, healthy, successful and long life, regardless of their background.

Things about offenders...
Barnardo’s has launched a new website National Information Centre on Children of Offenders (NICCO), which replaces i-HOP. The website provides resources, information on services, policy developments, events, training opportunities and practice models to professionals who come into contact with the children and families of offenders in England and Wales, as well as academics and those responsible for strategic development and commissioning.

Things for the Bank Holiday...
The weather is forecast to be good for this weekend so if you fancy getting out into the countryside there are plenty of activities to choose from at  National Trust  and Peak District National Park 

Things to eat...
So for a nice summer starter or even for a picnic these goat's cheese and shallot tarts sound perfect.

If you are not working have a lovely weekend and Bank Holiday and remember we will be closed on Monday.




Friday, 27 April 2018

Things in the library 27 April...

Things about honey...
A recent Cochrane review evaluated the effectiveness of honey for acute cough in children in ambulatory settings. They concluded that honey probably relieves cough symptoms to a greater extent than no treatment, diphenhydramine, and placebo, but may make little or no difference compared to dextromethorphan. Honey probably reduces cough duration better than placebo and salbutamol. There was no strong evidence for or against using honey. Most of the children received treatment for one night, which is a limitation to the results of this review. There was no difference in occurrence of adverse events between the honey and control arms.

Things about pre-conception...
Parental environmental factors, including diet, body composition, metabolism, and stress, affect the health and chronic disease risk of people throughout their lives, as captured in the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease concept. Research across the epidemiological, clinical, and basic science fields has identified the period around conception as being crucial for the processes mediating parental influences on the health of the next generation. During this time, from the maturation of gametes through to early embryonic development, parental lifestyle can adversely influence long-term risks of offspring cardiovascular, metabolic, immune, and neurological morbidities, often termed developmental programming. This is discussed in an article in the Lancet and calls for a major re-examination of public health policy to protect against future disease risk through societal advice on, and greater provision of, preconception care, as also promoted in the two accompanying reviews in this Series. Although a focus on parental risk factors during the preconception period, such as smoking and excess alcohol intake, is wise and well established, new drives to prepare nutritionally for pregnancy are crucial, including healthy body composition, physical activity, and diet for both parents.

Things about medicines...
The King's fund have published a briefing looking at how much the health service spends in total on medicines, both generics and branded medicines, based on publicly available data. In recent years, spending on branded medicines has been constrained by the Pharmaceutical Price Regulation Scheme a new instalment of which is currently under negotiation. They also explore policies used to try to control growth in costs and the choices policy-makers are likely to face in the future.






Things about pints...
Pint of Science festival returns to Sheffield from Monday 14 - Wednesday 16 May, featuring talks by colleagues from across the University. Taking place in six of the city’s best-loved pubs, the festival promises a fascinating insight into the research of our University’s world-leading scientists.
Some events sell out quickly as they are in small venues - tickets just £4.



Things about clinical research...

To celebrate International Clinical Trials Day, on Friday 18th May the NIHR Sheffield Clinical Research Facility at RHH is opening its doors to the public for a tour of the facility. Led by one of their experienced research nurses, you will have the chance to meet their diverse team and ask any burning questions you have about clinical research. There’ll be an opportunity to try out some research activities with their research therapists, and learn more about the varied, exciting and innovative work taking place in the STH Trust. Free but you need to register.

Things to make...
Still without cooking facilities at my house (though the end is in sight) but when I have an oven again I rather fancy these Apricot, honey & pistachio flapjacks . Perhaps the honey will help with my cough....though that probably has more to do with all the plaster dust!