Friday, 17 August 2018

Things in the library 17th August...

journalsThings to attend...
The next journal club will be Tuesday 21 Aug 1-2pm, in the Education and Skills Centre, F Floor, Stephenson Wing. Paper: "General practitioner referrals to paediatric specialist outpatient clinics: referral goals and parental influence" Journal Club is open to all health professionals and is a fun, informal way of learning to criticize papers and gather evidence to change practice. At each meeting a speaker presents a critical appraisal of a research paper, using a recognised appraisal tool such as CASP
Group members then have an informal discussion to determine whether or not current practice should be altered in light of the presenter's findings

Things to buy...
We have some old editions of books available for sale - first come first served....please check out the trolley in the library or click this link to view the list . If you are registered with the library we can save items for you and we will add the the cost of them to your library account...please note this is a commitment to buy...we will not reserve items for you to look at and then decide you don't want to buy.

Things about CAMHS...
A briefing paper published by House of Commons Library on 'Children and young people’s mental health – policy, services, funding and education' is available. It includes: background on CAMHS services; government policy in CAMHS since 2010; select committee enquiries; mental health in schools; further reading suggestions.

Things about pollution and prams...
Sometimes health news items make you think 'where on earth has that come from',  'is it true' and no doubt as health professionals you may have parents/carers then asking you about various 'scares'. Recently I spotted this "Babies and young children in prams can be exposed to up to 60% more pollution than adults, a study suggests," BBC News reports. My first stop when wanting to check things out like this is always NHS Behind the headlines which is really useful. They discuss where the story came from, the original research and interpretation and then their own conclusion about the story. In this case:
This review does not present enough evidence to say definitively that babies are exposed to more pollution than the person pushing the pram. The widely reported figure of 60% higher levels of pollution came from a single US study. The other studies found in this review had mixed results, with some indicating higher levels at adult height compared to pram height.
The review was also neither able to say if the style or type of pram made any difference to exposure to pollutants, nor whether using a cover would be better or actually trap in any pollutants.
Despite the limitations of this study, there is evidence outlining the effects of pollution and its negative effects on the development of diseases such as coronary heart disease, stroke, lung cancer and childhood asthma, therefore tackling air pollution is already a government priority. This research does not have the methodological strength to add anything new to current research in the area howeve
r.
Things to eat...
This Basque style salmon stew is always a summer favourite - although I cook it in a little stock until the spuds are almost done before adding the tomatoes.



Friday, 10 August 2018

Things in the library 10 Aug...


Things about community health...
The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) has published findings from a survey of 188 newly trained paediatricians. The survey found that only 9.6% of newly trained paediatricians took up a consultant post in community child health – the specialty which is also responsible for assessing children for abuse or neglect. The RCPCH believes that around 80 more community paediatricians are needed each year for the next five years to help sustain and improve these services. See all the details in this report CCT and CESR Class of 2016: Where are they now?

Emerging things...
Today, eight health and social care regulators and other bodies have signed a new agreement to help them share concerns with each other more effectively. The CQC says" The ‘Emerging Concerns Protocol’ seeks to provide a clearly defined mechanism for us to share information and intelligence that may indicate risks to users of services, their carers, families or professionals".  To see the protocol and the organisations that have signed up to it, click here.

Things to see...
The University of Sheffield has launched a special photography exhibition which celebrates the contribution of their non-UK EU colleagues. 'A Part of Sheffield' shares the stories of colleagues who have made a life and home in Sheffield. Portrait photographer and local Sheffield resident, Jeremy Abrahams, was commissioned to photograph a group of staff who represent a range of occupations and departments across the University, and a range of other EU countries. Each participant is represented by a series of portraits and documentary-style images of them at work and in familiar places in Sheffield. The photography helps to tell their stories about what it means to be a part of Sheffield and how they contribute to the University and the City, whilst highlighting their personal concerns about the vote to leave the EU and the sense of uncertainty and change that this has brought. You can visit the exhibition in the following locations:
6 - 17 August - Jessop West Foyer
20 - 31 August - The Diamond Ground Floor Exhibition Space

Things about exercise & mental health...
In The Lancet Psychiatry this week a cross-sectional study about the association of mental health and physical exercise . Their interpretation of the findings is that "In a large US sample, physical exercise was significantly and meaningfully associated with self-reported mental health burden in the past month. More exercise was not always better. Differences as a function of exercise were large relative to other demographic variables such as education and income. Specific types, durations, and frequencies of exercise might be more effective clinical targets than others for reducing mental health burden, and merit interventional study."

Things to help you listen...



The Samaritans wants to encourage people to listen to the really important things their friends, family and colleagues need to tell them, and to actually devote some time and attention to being better listeners. When people feel listened to, it can save a life. Suggestions for becoming a better listener are here in their SHUSH listening tips.





Things to eat...
Kate's choice this week ...a lovely recipe for herby chicken & potato salad that is quick to prepare.




Friday, 3 August 2018

Things in the library 3 Aug ...

Things about anti-social behaviour...

Sensation seeking was found to be a strong predictor of antisocial behaviors for youth across two different sociocultural contexts in this study. High parental monitoring buffered the association between sensation seeking and antisocial behaviors, protecting individuals with this trait. Low parental warmth was associated with high levels of antisocial behaviors, regardless of the sensation seeking level. Among those with high parental warmth, sensation seeking predicted antisocial behaviors, but the levels of antisocial behaviors were never as high as those of youth with low parental warmth.This study's findings underscore the relevance of person–family context interactions in the development of antisocial behaviors. Future interventions should focus on the interplay between individual vulnerabilities and family context to prevent the unhealthy expression of a trait that is present in many individuals.

Things about physical activity...
NICE will not update the guideline on physical activity for children and young people. The majority of new evidence was found to be broadly consistent with the current recommendations. They found new evidence on multicomponent interventions and after-school programmes, which was not fully in line with the current recommendations; however, no impact is expected due to high heterogeneity in study findings and small sample sizes in studies. They also found new evidence on the effect of classroom equipment and active video games, which are not mentioned in the guideline. Further research is required in these areas before the impact on recommendations can be considered. More information  on the 2018 surveillance and a link to the current guidance can be accessed here.

Things about dissection...and dinner...
Anatomy Lab LIVE is a touring human body-based anatomy event.  Their 2019 tour (Sheffield 16/2/2019) focuses on surgery and the corrective intervention methods used to treat pathology. After your two course evening meal the drapes will go up (literally) and a fully working state of the art operating theatre will reveal the patient. The surgery will offer a unique chance to follow a complete surgical procedure from start to finish observing and dissecting real anatomical specimens. All samples used in the performance are harvested from spent swine material, the surgical team use these as they are the most ethical and closest to human possible The level of content is undergraduate and offers CPD refresher for current healthcare practitioners.

Things about self-regulation...|
Self-regulation encompasses a range of skills, including controlling your own emotions, interacting positively with others, avoiding inappropriate or aggressive actions, and carrying out self-directed learning. This review looked at universal self-regulation interventions (those that were aimed at whole groups/cohorts of healthy children or teenagers), rather than those aimed at children with particular needs. Activities included mindfulness and yoga, family-based, exercise-based and social and personal skills-based tasks. This is a comprehensive review of rigorous evaluations including 49 trials mainly from the US providing moderate to strong evidence on effectiveness.

Things with muffins...
The next journal club will be Thursday 9 August 8.00 am - 9.00 am, in the Education and Skills Centre, F Floor, Stephenson Wing. Paper: Practice Change From Intermittent Medication Boluses to Bolusing From a Continuous Infusion in Pediatric Critical Care: A Quality Improvement Project. Journal Club is open to all health professionals and is a fun, informal way of learning to criticize papers and gather evidence to change practice.

Things on a tightrope...
Just across the road from the hospital there is the Western Bank Library Exhibition Gallery. The current exhibition is 'Circus Performers: Extraordinary Feats from Ordinary People' the exhibition examines the stories behind the pioneering showmen and Circus performers who have thrilled audiences around the world. From the equestrian skills of Philip Astley to human cannonballs, visitors can discover the reality behind the amazing talents of acrobats, aerialists, animal tamers and clowns and learn what made and continues to make them so special. Open Monday to Thursday from 9am to 7pm, Friday 10am to 7pm, Saturday 12pm until 6pm (excluding holidays).

Things to make and freeze...
The blackberries will soon be ready for picking - if you don't want to make pies or jam then why not try making this blackberry compote which is really easy and would then bring a taste of summer along with ice-cream later in the year. If you don't want to scrabble around in the undergrowth out in the countryside (the best way!) you could always try pick your own fruit (I think the nearest is at Dronfield Woodhouse)...contact them to find out what fruits are available...website not up-to-date)







Friday, 27 July 2018

Things in the library 27 July...

Things the government says...
The Government response to the joint report of the Education and Health and Social Care Committees on 'Transforming children and young people's mental health provision: a green paper' has been published.

Things about HPV...
It was announced this week that adolescent boys will be offered the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine to protect them from cancer. The vaccine not only protects men from HPV-related diseases – such as oral, throat and anal cancer – but also helps reduce the overall number of cervical cancers in women, though a process known as ‘herd immunity’.The extension of the vaccine to boys follows the success of England’s HPV vaccination programme for girls and the recent introduction of one for men who have sex with men. The programme is expected to vaccinate thousands of boys in England each year. This statement sets out the conclusions of the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) on extending the HPV vaccination programme to adolescent boys in the UK.

Things about quality of life...
Epilepsy in children negatively impacts on caregiver quality of life (QOL). The study [in Journal of neurology] aimed to evaluate the relationships between patient factors [demographics, clinical factors, health-related quality of life (HRQL)], contextual factors (socio-economic factors), caregiver mood, and caregiver QOL, and whether family factors mediate the relationship between patient HRQL and caregiver QOL. They conclude that:
"Patient HRQL and caregiver mood were more important correlates of caregiver QOL than seizure severity in medically intractable epilepsy. The findings are significant in delineating variables (caregiver mood and family factors) that are potentially modifiable, and show promise for improving caregiver QOL."
Things about parental pre-operative anxiety...

This systematic review and meta-analysis looks at studies assessing the effectiveness of audiovisual (AV) interventions aimed at reducing anxiety in parents whose children are undergoing elective surgery. Their primary outcome was parental anxiety. Secondary outcomes included children’s preoperative anxiety and postoperative outcomes; parental satisfaction, knowledge, and need for anesthesia information. If you cannot access the full text of this article (or any other) than SCH staff can request from us using our online form 

Things to read...
It is our August reading group meeting next week (Wed 17:15 in the library) we will be discussing 'The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel' so do come and join us over a drink and nibbles. Our next book for Sept is the classic 'Catch 22'. Don't forget we have quite a large collection of leisure books available for you to borrow for your summer holiday reading - come and have a browse of check what we have online.



Things flapping about...
This summer we have constantly been serenaded by seagulls...no the tide hasn't come in to Sheffield ...they are nesting close by. This week we spotted the juvenile birds walking around on the roof.



Things to make without heat...
If you are finding it too hot to cook at the moment there is a nice collection of recipes here to tempt you





Friday, 20 July 2018

Things in the library 20 July

things to knock you out...

Around a third of children aged 2 to 15 in the UK are overweight or obese. Children are becoming obese at an earlier age, staying obese for longer and children from lower income household are more than twice as likely to be obese than those in high income households.
The King's Fund have released a blog post: Second’s out, round two: Is the government’s latest childhood obesity plan a knockout? The government’s first childhood obesity plan was simply not good enough to address these challenges. The obesity plan, chapter 2 is now here. One way to answer if it is better than the first is to assess it against the Health and Social Care Committee’s refreshed recommendations based on its most recent grilling of the experts. The King's Fund has produced a table to show this.

things dawning...
A new dawn for children’s health and wellbeing. NHS England’s National Clinical Director for Children and Young People highlights how the journey to integrated care presents a real opportunity to join up pathways around the needs of children and families. Read her blog post here. You can follow this link to see more about integrated care in South Yorkshire and Bassetlaw.

things that are working...
A new Government-funded project to help people with common physical health problems or mental health issues to get into or stay in work is now being trialled in the Sheffield area.  The project – Working Win – has been implemented by the South Yorkshire and Bassetlaw Integrated Care System (ICS). The ICS has described it as ‘fitting exactly’ with its plan to focus on factors that affect health such as education, employment and housing to not only improve the health, wellbeing and life choices of every person in the region but also to deliver a more financially sustainable health and care system for the future. More information about the scheme is available on the workinwin and sheffieldcityregion websites.

unusual things for summer desserts..
I thought this pea mousse was a starter but apparently it makes a great dessert! Decorate with pea shoots and flowers for the wow factor.

Friday, 13 July 2018

Things in the Library 13 July

Things to report..

Our usual blogger is in Croatia but judging by her photos is not intending to watch the World Cup final in a bar with the locals! This stunning picture, taken by Gill is of Solta, an island near Split.


Things that could save lives..
Improving communication between paramedics, prehospital critical care teams and emergency staff could “enhance” the care and wellbeing of critically ill or injured patients, according to UK studies. Researchers from the University of Stirling found that improving the accuracy and quality of patient information during handovers yielded positive results. The researchers studies are published in the Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine and BMC Emergency Medicine.
Things to spend..
The King’s Fund has published a ‘long-read’ The NHS 10-year plan: how should the extra funding be spent?  Following the announcement of additional NHS funding, this article discusses the opportunities to tackle the issues that matter most to patients and communities and to improve health and care.  It covers learning from the past, improving productivity, priorities for a 10 year plan, improving population health, a new deal with the public, funding and reform of social care, and securing the future workforce.

Vulnerable things...
Over two million children in England are growing up in families where there are serious risks, major study from Children’s Commissioner reveals. The report, “The Children’s Commissioner’s 2018 Report into Childhood Vulnerability”, estimates that 2.1 million of England’s 11.8 million children – one in six – are living in families with risks so serious that they need some level of help. The study also warns that for 1.6 million of those vulnerable children, the support is effectively ‘invisible’ – we don’t know if they are actually getting any coordinated help, despite the difficulties they are growing up with. Some of the risks these children face include parents with mental health problems or parents who are alcoholics or have substance abuse problems.

Respiratory things..
Pediatric Pulmonology, Asthma, and Sleep Medicine A Quick Reference Guide.
Starting with the signs, symptoms, and conditions most commonly encountered in primary pulmonary care, the book provides advice for appropriate testing, treatment plans, and common complications for which to watch.  Available for library members to borrow from the Illingworth Library 






Croatian things to eat..
Soparnik is a usually savoury pie with a filling of Swiss chard though kale can be used. It is the most famous speciality of the dalmatian region Poljica between Split and Omiš. It is a very simple dish made from common ingredients from the region: Chard with onions and parsley between two layers of simplest dough. Among the numerous local variations there are also sweet ones, for example with nuts, dried fruits or caramel.

I do not know if Gill will have tried this but you can make it by following this recipe . The page also links to a recipe for flatbread stuffed with caramelised vegetables and goat's cheese.



Friday, 6 July 2018

Things in the library 6th July...


Things about the outside...
An article in J Epidemiol Community Health looks at the 'Mental health benefits of interactions with nature in children and teenagers: a systematic review.' and the findings support the contention that nature positively influences mental health; however, in most cases, additional research with more rigorous study designs and objective measures of both nature and mental health outcomes are needed to confirm statistically significant relationships. Existing evidence is limited by the cross-sectional nature of most papers.

The next birthday...
Celebrating the 70th birthday of the NHS has prompted the Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA) to do some crystal ball gazing and look at what the NHS might be like at 100. Their conclusions include:
"The challenges facing the NHS over the next 30 years are significant. Some of these we can see developing now, others are beyond our comprehension as the technology does not yet exist." 
"However, the people that we are training now, and in the coming decades, need to be prepared to face the challenges and continue to meet the guiding principles of the NHS, that it is free at the point of delivery and based on need, not ability to pay. Developing technologies that are changing working practices require a flexible workforce that can adapt and learn throughout their working lives. And increasing personalisation across both care and medicine means that the challenge of efficiency through standardisation will be replaced by a more bespoke approach that needs to remain equitable for the whole population. These future developments are set against a backdrop of  a growing, and ageing, population with increasing needs for care while funding for that care is decreasing. The challenge for the NHS and the wider health and care economy is to have a sustainable and effective service that meets the population’s needs in 2048."



Things about obesity & depression...
Childhood mental illness is poorly recognised by healthcare providers and parents, despite half of all lifetime cases of diagnosable mental illness beginning by the age of 14 years.Globally, depression is the leading cause of disease burden, as measured by disability-adjusted life years, in children aged 10–19 years.Untreated, it is associated with poor school performance and social functioning, substance misuse, recurring depression in adulthood and increased suicide risk, which is the second leading cause of preventable death among young people.The resulting cost to the National Health Service of treating depression is estimated at over £2 billion, and the wider social and economic impact of depression is likely to be considerable.This is the background to a  systematic review and random-effect meta-analysis of observational studies to see if  obesity is associated with depression in children.

Things about truth...
The Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA) has published Victims and Survivors Speak Out - accounts of child sexual abuse shared with the Truth Project, set up for victims and survivors of child sexual abuse to share their experiences in a supportive and confidential setting.




Things about smoking and hospitals...
A major new report has been released by the Royal College of Physicians calls for a radical change in the way the NHS treats smoking, by providing opt-out cessation services as a routine component of all hospital care. The report found that by giving smokers the help they need to quit smoking while in hospital it will save lives, improve quality of life as well as increasing life expectancy for all smokers, and help to reduce the current £1 billion per year cost to the NHS of smoking by patients and staff. The report ‘Hiding in plain sight: Treating tobacco dependency in the NHS’ from the RCP’s Tobacco Advisory Group says that: "Treating tobacco dependency is not just about preventing disease: in many cases it represents effective disease treatment. Clinicians working in all areas of medicine can improve their patients’ lives by helping them to quit."



Things to make...

A really easy and yummy cake that kids can make almost by themselves 'Raspberry Yoghurt Cake'