Friday, 17 January 2020

Things in the library 17th January...

Things about healthcare systems...

The Association of Directors of Children’s Services published a position paper 'A health care system that works for all children' last year (ADCS is the national leadership association in England for statutory directors of children's services and their senior teams). In their executive summary they state:
"ADCS members believe that now, more than ever, there is a real need for a national commitment to ensure that the NHS of the future has children at it’s heart and children’s health and wellbeing services are given parity with those of older people."
Things about CAMHS...
The Education Policy Institute (EPI) has published its Annual Report on access to child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS). The study examines access to specialist services, waiting times for treatment, and provision for the most vulnerable children in England. The research is based on new data obtained using freedom of information (FOI) requests to mental health providers and local authorities over the course of a year. This data is not published by the NHS. The majority of lifelong mental health problems develop early on, during childhood or adolescence. The wider economic costs of mental ill health in England are vast, estimated at £105bn each year.

Things in the news today...
Sepsis
Global, regional, and national sepsis incidence and mortality, 1990–2017: analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study is the article on which the headlines are commenting. The interpretation of the results from the authors is:
"Despite declining age-standardised incidence and mortality, sepsis remains a major cause of health loss worldwide and has an especially high health-related burden in sub-Saharan Africa."

Social Media
Along with exploring the impact of screen time generally, this paper 'Technology use and the mental health of children and young people' from the Royal College of Psychiatrists also explores the impact of different types of screen use: negative content; how vulnerable groups may be affected such as those with mental health problems and very young
children; potential for bullying and safeguarding issues; as well as the potential for addiction. In addition, guidance is provided for children and young people, parents and carers, clinicians and teachers.

Things about patient feedback...
The National Institute for Health Research published a themed review this week on Improving Care by Using Patient Feedback. There are many different reasons for looking at patient experience feedback data. Data is most often used for performance assessment and benchmarking in line with regulatory body requirements,  making comparisons with other healthcare providers or to assess progress over time. Staff are sometimes unaware of the feedback, or when they are, they struggle to make sense of it in a way that can lead to improvements. They are not always aware of unsolicited feedback, such as that received online and when they are, they are often uncertain how to  respond. 
  • Staff need the time, skills and resources to make changes in practice. In many organisations, feedback about patient experience is managed in different departments from those that lead quality improvement. Whilst most organisations have a standardised method for quality improvement, there is less clarity and consistency in relation to using patient experience data.
  • Staff act on informal feedback in ways that are not always recognised as improvement. Where change does happen, it tends to be on transactional tasks rather than relationships and the way patients feel. 
  • The research featured in this review shows that these challenges can be overcome and provides recommendations and links to practical resources for services and staff.
Things to take part in...
The next Randomised Coffee Trial will be taking place in the SCH Trust in February. Sign-up now via this link . If you previously asked to be included in all future RCTs there is no need to sign up again. If you are new to the Trust - our RCTs run two or three times a year, you sign up and are randomly matched to someone else and you arrange to meet at a mutually convenient time for 30-40 mins to chat about anything you like. It is a good way of meeting new colleagues, taking time out and widening networks. The positive responses we get show how much it is enjoyed. Last time we had a few people who signed up but then didn't make contact with their matchee..please be courteous and inform the library and the other person if you cannot meet so that we can try to re-match the other person.

Things to make...
If you want a nice brunch dish there are some good suggestions here based on baked eggs.

Friday, 10 January 2020

Things in the library 10th Jan...

Things that are calming...
Childline has launched Calm Zone - an online hub of calming techniques and resources for young people to help them feel better when they feel anxious, scared or sad.


Things about research ethics...
NSPCC are looking for an experienced researcher to join their Research Ethics Committee.Their Research Ethics Committee is made up of experienced researchers from outside the NSPCC who review research proposals, provide an impartial review of the ethical implications of evaluation and research proposals and work collaboratively with researches to address any concerns. They are seeking expressions of interest from an experienced researcher who has:

  • a detailed understanding of the dimensions of ethics and issues related to research with children and young people
  • an understanding of the ethical issues associated with quantitative methods in the context of sensitive research with children and young people
  • substantive experience of research governance.

Things to do tomorrow (Sat 11th Jan)...
The University of Sheffield's  Landscape Team is offering free Christmas tree chipping in the Information Commons car park from 8am-2pm on Saturday 11 January 2020. Just arrive with your tree at any point between these times and they'll put it through their chipper. Once the chippings have broken down, they'll be used as mulch across campus to keep it bright and beautiful throughout 2020.
This chipping service is open to everyone, not just staff and students, so do share with your friends and neighbours. The car park is on Favell Road (accessed via Hounsfield Road off Glossop Road and then Leaveygreave Rd).

Things to win yourself a prize...
Find your way around our library website and enter this 70th birthday quiz. The winning entry will be chosen from all correct entries received by 4pm on Friday 31st January.




Things to read...
The next book to read for our monthly Reading Group is Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton. The meeting to discuss this will be on Wed 5th Feb at 17:15 in the library. Edith Wharton's most famous novel, written immediately after the end of the First World War, is a brilliantly realised anatomy of New York society in the 1870s, the world in which she grew up, and from which she spent her life escaping. Newland Archer, Wharton's protagonist, charming, tactful, enlightened, is a thorough product of this society; he accepts its standards and abides by its rules but he also recognises its limitations. His engagement to the impeccable May Welland assures him of a safe and conventional future, until the arrival of May's cousin Ellen Olenska puts all his plans in jeopardy. Independent, free-thinking, scandalously separated from her husband, Ellen forces Archer to question the values and assumptions of his narrow world. As their love for each other grows, Archer has to decide where his ultimate loyalty lies.

Things written by you and your colleagues...
We now have an online repository of references to articles written recently by SCH staff. We are cataloguing the PubMed abstracts and if you cannot access the article's full text then we will be able to supply in the usual way- charges may apply - or you can ask your colleague! We hope that this will highlight the amount of published material written by SCH staff  (240 items to date) and be helpful in disseminating it widely to colleagues. Please note that we only list SCH authors/co-authors on the catalogue records.

Things to eat...


I made this Coconut fish curry this week which was very quick but still excellent with plenty of taste.




Friday, 3 January 2020

Things in the library 3rd Jan ...

Happy New Year to all SCH staff and to our Library users

Things to celebrate...
This year marks the 70th birthday of our library. In May 1950 the decision was made that there should be a selection of books and journals available for staff to use and so the first library was formed - located in the stenographers office somewhere close to where Theo's cafe is now.
During the year we will be marking this birthday with a series of special events highlighting the work of the library from the past, the present and looking forward to the future. Cake and prizes will feature!

Things about immunisation...
The World Health Organisation (Europe) has developed a Tailoring Immunization Programme (TIP). The phases and steps of a TIP process are described in detail in this document, supported by inspiration examples and exercises for TIP planning workshop. To achieve high and equitable vaccination uptake, it is necessary to understand the barriers to vaccination among the population groups with sub-optimal coverage. Then solutions can be designed which support, motivate and enable people to be vaccinated. Solutions which ensure all population groups are vaccinated, regardless of their income, education, age, geography, ethnicity, religion or philosophical beliefs. 

Things about tooth decay...
A whole system approach to tackling childhood tooth decay has been proposed by Local Government Association in their report. Too many children still experience problems at a young age – nearly a quarter of five-year olds have decayed, missing or filled teeth and children from deprived areas have more than twice the level of decay than children from the least deprived areas. It means tooth decay remains the most common reason for hospital admission in children aged six to 10, with those from deprived areas most likely to suffer problems.Dental treatment under general anaesthetic presents a small but real risk of life threatening complications. What is more, poor oral health can affect children’s ability to sleep, eat, speak, play and socialise with other children. It can disrupt school attendance and lead to parents needing to take time off work.
This report contains a whole range of examples of the steps that need to be taken to achieve success. Many of the areas included are places where there have traditionally been high rates of tooth decay, but where significant improvements are now being made.

Things Hygge...
University restaurant Inox above the Student's Union will again be celebrating the Danish celebration of Hygge. Between Monday 20 to Friday 24 January their menus will be dedicated to this celebration of wellbeing. They are promising to deliver a delicious menu - in their calming restaurant and lounge. Go along and try some new, different dishes and take time for your own wellbeing. Inox will see a transformation with candles, dimmed lights and calming music, to become an escape from those busy every day lives. Tables throughout the week with themed menus. From 3.50 GBP per person more details on their website.

Things to join...
Our well attended Reading Group will be meeting on Wednesday 8th January at 17:15 to chat about The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey.

Journal Club is another event happening next week, on Thursday 9th from 08:00 to 9:00 in the Clinical Skills Centre F Floor, Stephenson Wing. 


Things leftover...
I hope all your Christmas foods have now been consumed but if you have any New Year's cheese left over there are some great ideas of how to use it up before starting on your January diets! I think this Cheese, leek and potato tortilla sounds quick and easy.




Friday, 20 December 2019

Things in the library 20 Dec...

Things festive and dusty...
We will be having our annual pre-Christmas workout in the library on Monday....our stocktake day. We will be closed all day but will be open in the evening from 17:00 until 19:00.

We are then closed over Christmas and New Year, re-opening on Thursday Jan 2nd so we wish you all a Merry Christmas & a Happy New Year. If you need to return items when we are closed then a book-drop box is available outside the library.

Things about cell genomics...
There is a SITraN external seminar  on January 10th 12:00 - 13:00 in Meeting rooms B02/B03, SITraN, 385a Glossop Road. The speaker is John Marioni - Cancer Research Uk, Cambridge / European Bioinformatics Institute , University of Cambridge
Title: "Using single cell genomics to understand cell fate decisions"
With recent technological developments it has become possible to characterise a single cell’s genome, epigenome, transcriptome and proteome. However, to take advantage of such data it is critical that appropriate computational methods are applied and developed. In this presentation, I will describe some of the computational challenges and the solutions we have developed, focusing particularly on applications in the context of cell fate decisions in early mammalian development.

Things about neonates...
The Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership has published National Neonatal Audit Programme 2019: annual report on 2018 data.  The National Neonatal Audit Programme (NNAP) reports on key measures of the care provided to babies in 181 neonatal services across England, Wales, Scotland and the Isle of Man.  Included in this annual report for the first time is network level reporting of mortality until discharge from the neonatal unit, and adherence to neonatal nurse staffing standards.

and also...
NHS England has published Implementing the recommendations of the Neonatal Critical Care Transformation Review.  This action plan to implement the recommendations of the Neonatal Critical Care Transformation Review sets out how the NHS will further improve neonatal care with the support of funding set out in the NHS Long Term Plan.

Things about Paediatric Intensive Care...
The Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership has published Paediatric Intensive Care Audit Network: Annual Report 2019.  This is the sixteenth annual PICANet clinical audit report summarising paediatric critical care that took place in the United Kingdom and Republic of  Ireland between 2016 and 2018.  It provides data on five key metrics: case ascertainment; retrieval mobilisation times; number of qualified nurses per bed; emergency readmissions within 48 hours and mortality in PICU.

Image by Hans Braxmeier from Pixabay 
Things carolling...
If you want to catch some Christmas carol singing in Sheffield over the next few days then this search should bring you plenty of choice.





Things to eat...
Savoury Baklava Recipe for VegetariansIf you are catering for vegetarians (or anyone else!) over the Christmas period there are some fantastic recipes here like this savoury spiced baklava.


Friday, 13 December 2019

Things in the library 13th Dec...

Things to listen and watch...
The Snowman: Live   Saturday 21 December, 3pm Family ticket: £40 (up to two adults) Under 18s £10 / Adults £14 Babies go free
Raymond Brigg’s heartwarming tale of a snowman that comes to life, and his adventures with the little boy who built him is magically brought to life in this breathtaking performance!
A full orchestra (Sheffield Rep.) will play Howard Blake’s musical score live as you watch the film. The orchestra will also be playing a medley of music from the film FROZEN, alongside other Christmassy favourites; timeless Christmas magic for the whole family!
This concert takes place in The Octagon, Clarkson Street, Sheffield S10 2TQ.
The event is seated but specific seat numbers are not allocated.

Things inside...
The human microbiota plays a crucial role in educating the immune system and influencing host health right since birth. Various maternal factors along with the vertical microbial transfer from the mother, as well as the horizontal environmental transmission and internal factors relating to the infant, play a crucial role in modulating the gut microbiota. The early life microflora is highly unstable and undergoes dynamic changes during the first few years, converging towards a more stabilized adult microbiota by co-evolving with the host by the age of 3-4 years. Microbiota studies have underlined the role of dysbiosis in developing several metabolic disorders like obesity, diabetes and immune-related disorders like asthma, to name a few. Thus, understanding early life microbial composition and various factors affecting the microbial community will provide a platform for developing strategies/techniques to maintain host health by restoring gut microbial flora. This review focuses on the factors that affect the microbial composition of the foetus in utero, during birth, infancy through childhood.

Things about delivering care with magic...
This article discusses five unconventional health and care organisations. These are organisations that have considered deeply the needs of people in their care and found substantively different ways of supporting them, in some cases adopting practices that might seem unusual or even risky to people working in traditional health and care services. There is also evidence that they have been successful, including in coping with increasing demand for services, delivering humane and compassionate care with limited resources and providing effective support for people with complex needs. The long read highlights common features of these organisations’ approach: their ways of working with service users, their approach to providing care, their organisational structures and their management practices. Magic is one of the examples used in Evelina London Children’s Hospital with children with hemiplegia.

Things to drink...
Research shows that what children drink – from birth through age 5 – can have a big impact on their health, as beverages make a significant contribution to dietary intake during this period. However, with so many choices available in the marketplace, it can be confusing for parents and caregivers to know which drinks are healthy and which ones to avoid. Many authoritative bodies have issued guidance and recommendations for healthy beverage intake, but important gaps exist as these recommendations have not been comprehensive in the age groups covered or in the types of beverages discussed. Given the importance of beverage consumption in early childhood and the need for comprehensive and consistent evidence-based recommendations, Healthy Eating Research convened an expert panel representing 4 key national health and nutrition organizations to develop comprehensive recommendations for beverage consumption consistent with a healthy diet for children from birth to age 5. The 4 organizations represented on the expert panel are the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American Heart Association. The beverage recommendations put forward by this expert panel are based on the best available evidence and provide consistent messages that can be used by health care providers, public health practitioners, and parents and caregivers to improve the beverage intake patterns of infants and young children. This consensus statement presents the expert recommendations and an overview of the evidence for why certain beverages are or are not healthy for young children.

Things to attend...
Journal Club F Floor Stephenson Wing,  Thursday 19 Dec 8.00 - 9.00 am, the article being presented and discussed is 'Chromosomal Microarray Analysis and Whole-ExomeSequencing in Children With ASD'. Please contact the library if you wish to see a copy of the paper.



Image result for cosy readingThings to read next year...
The full list of books we will be reading in our Reading Group next year and the dates are as follows. As always we will have one copy of each available to borrow in the library - we have an extensive fiction collection now so do come and choose some Christmas reading.


8th  Jan   The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey 

5th Feb    Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton

4th Mar   Ella Minnow Pea by Mark Dunn

1st  Apr    Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Strout

6th  May  The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern 

3rd  Jun    God’s Own Country by Ross Raisin

1st  Jul     Before the Coffee gets Cold by Toshikazu Kawaguchi

5th Aug    The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt

2nd  Sep   When I had a little sister by Catherine Simpson.

7th  Oct     The versions of us by Laura Barnett

4th Nov    John Wyndham: Day of the Triffids

2nd  Dec  The Silver Sword by Ian Serraillier

6th Jan 2021 The Giver of Stars by Jojo Moyes

Things to eat...
A breakfast dish for today, Papas a lo pobre with chorizo,


Friday, 6 December 2019

Things in the library 6th Dec...

Things to read...
We had our Reading group Christmas Party this week with a bumper attendance of 14 people. The books for next year are all chosen and will be announced shortly when we have confirmed which book will be read when. I can tell you however that the book we will be reading over Christmas and discussing in our meeting on 8th January will be 'The Snow Child' by Eowyn Ivey set in Alaska in 1920.



Things to attend...
ScHARR are running a course in May next year on 'The Identification and Review of Evidence to Inform Cost Effectiveness Models' there is an early Bird booking fee available until March 6th. The course will enable participants to develop an understanding of the methods available for the identification and review of evidence to inform cost effectiveness models. The course will meet the needs of those involved in health technology assessments and is particularly suited to:

• Health economic modellers wishing to extend their knowledge of how to identify and review evidence

• Information specialists who wish to advance their skills in identifying evidence for cost effectiveness models

• Systematic reviewers who wish to extend their reviewing skills related to cost effectiveness models

Alice Roberts (illus)
Things of beauty (and to use)...
Professor Alice Roberts makes programmes and write books about human anatomy, physiology, evolution, archaeology and history. She is also a medical doctor, and now a university lecturer. She taught human anatomy to students and doctors, and did research into human origins and disease in ancient skeletons - her talents also include watercolours and illustrations. This week she has uploaded many of her anatomy illustrations to her flickr page and says they are free to download and use for private use or any sort of teaching - please credit her as the illustrator.

Things about microbes...
The Annual Christmas Lecture on antimicrobial resistance by pioneers in the field, Professor Simon Foster and Professor David Hornby of the University of Sheffield is taking place Mon 9th Dec at 18:30 Man vs Microbe: Battle to the Death in Lecture Theatre 2 ,The Diamond Building. Whilst everyone is welcome, this event is suggested for those 16 and over, the event is free and open to the public The event is first come first come first served.

Things to make...
Today is Sinterklass in the Netherlands - last night shoes would have magically been filled with biscuits and sweets. My eldest son was born in the Netherlands and is staying with us at the moment so we thought we had better make an effort this year - courtesy of Tesco! However much nicer is to make your own Kruidnoten, Pepernoten or Speculaas. These biscuits are spiced with ginger, cinnamon, white pepper, cardamom, cloves, and nutmeg, with a hint of molasses. The origin of these traditional treats is intricately linked to the history of the Netherlands. The Dutch controlled the spice trade with the East in the 17th century, making the use of spices more accessible to ordinary Dutch people. Spices were still expensive, however, which is why their use was reserved for the holidays.

...and read

An interesting read around the history of this time is Nathaniel's Nutmeg by Giles Minton an adventure story of unthinkable hardship and savagery, the navigation of uncharted waters, and the exploitation of new worlds, not always easy to read but is it a remarkable chapter in the history of the colonial powers of that time.




Things to sing...
The local carol workshop will be held again this year for University staff and friends - a chance to sing some well known and lesser known Christmas carols, many originating from the villages to the north of Sheffield. These workshops were originally put on for staff in what was LeTS, and expanded quickly to include friends in other parts of the University as well as family members and friends.
There will be one session this year:  Friday 20 December  from 12.30-1.50pm  (come and go as you please - no need to book)

The venue is St Andrew's URC Church on Upper Hanover Street (the church with the spire near University tram stop). Supported by members of Worrall Male Voice Choir (Musical Director: Nigel Russell-Sewell) and Broomhall Community Choir (Musical Director: Stephen Vickers), due to popularity the workshops have grown from a few people meeting in the Union TV studio, to Firth Hall, to moving five years ago to St Andrew's.

If you have a copy of "The Blue Book-The Joy of Christmas" please take that with you, otherwise the carols will be available on the day (and copies of the Blue Book will be available for purchase).



Friday, 29 November 2019

Things in the library 29 Nov...

Things about our RCT...
If you are new to the trust you may not have come across our Randomised Coffee (or other drinks) Trials. Anyone can join in and you will be randomly matched to someone else in the trust to meet and chat for 30 mins. The idea is to share knowledge and meet up with people you might otherwise never come across - you can talk about anything -it doesn't have to be work. Our last one was held in November and thank you for all those that took part and gave feedback. 100% said they had learnt something new and 85% said it had widened their professional network. Some quotes:

  • Can't recommend this enough, really worthwhile.
  • Very informative and was able to  find out info about an area I knew only a little about and correct some  misunderstandings regarding my role 
  • We spoke about our current roles, as well as career path overall, how our roles interacted, and about our hobbies etc
  • A great chance to be able to share things about the work I do that can help/aid other colleagues in other (seemingly unconnected) area of the trust. I would definitely do this again. 
The next one will be running in February (sign-up in January) so do consider taking part - however I was disappointed this time that several people reported that their 'partner' failed to reply to emails etc. If you sign up we know that plans can change and taking part may not be possible but please have the courtesy to  reply to your matchee to keep them informed.

Things to attend...
Journal Club Tuesday 3rd Dec 13:00 to 14:00 an excellent chance to eat homemade muffins...and also hear someone present a journal article and discuss it in a relaxed environment. Journal Club takes place on F Floor Stephenson Wing (Grey Lifts) - look at the notice board opposite the lift doors to check which room. The paper being discussed is "Efficacy of Prednisolone in bronchiolitis with and without family history of atopy". Do come along - all welcome and contact the library if you would like a copy of the paper.

Things announced...
The nominations for the Reading Group's choices for next year are now in. Each member of the group can suggest a maximum of 3 books they have either read and loved and want to share or a book they really want to read. We then vote on these, so each person will get one of 'their' books chosen. Next week's meeting on Wed 4th Dec at 17:15 for about 1 hour will have festive food and mulled drinks to accompany or choosing. Chosen books will be announced in next week's blog ...there are some fantastic suggestions. If you have wondered about coming along do come and meet us...if anyone wants a copy of the long list please email.

....and last year...  of the books that we read those we scored most highly are:

1st: The Choice by Edith Eger
2nd:The Penguin Book of the Contemporary British Short Story ed Philip Hensher
3rd: Redbird Christmas by Fannie Flagg (author of Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe)

Things about paediatric nursing...
In the American Journal of Pediatric Nursing is a review article 'Nursing surveillance for deterioration in pediatric patients'. 
Adverse events occur in up to 19% of pediatric hospitalized patients, often associated with delays in recognition or treatment. While early detection is recognized as a primary determinant of recovery from deterioration, most research has focused on profiling patient risk and testing interventions, and less on factors that impact surveillance efficacy. This integrative review explored actions and factors that influence the quality of pediatric nursing surveillance.
Things to eat...
It was sad this week to hear of the early death of Gary Rhodes - so this week one of his recipes Crispy parmesan chicken