Friday, 11 October 2019

Things in the library 11 October...

Things about mental health...
Public Health England (PHE), in partnership with the NHS, launched Every Mind Matters this week to help people take simple steps to look after their mental health, improve their mental wellbeing and support others.
It is increasingly recognised that taking care of our mental health is as important as maintaining good physical health. A new PHE survey reveals more than 8 in ten (83%) people have experienced early signs of poor mental health including feeling anxious, stressed, having low mood or trouble sleeping in the last 12 months. While these can be a natural response to life’s challenges, they can become more serious if people don’t take action, and many wait too long.

Things about childhood obesity...
An Independent Report by the Chief Medical Officer, 2019 Professor Dame Sally Davies was published yesterday. the media have picked up ,of course, on her comments about snacking on public transport. If you want to read the actual report click here. There are some truly shocking facts such as each week 738 children, enough to fill 13 school buses, are admitted to hospital to have teeth removed due to decay. Until recently type 2 diabetes was considered an adult disease. The first cases of the condition were reported in children [8 cases] in England in 2000. Today there are over 100 new diagnoses each year and over 700 children living with the condition. 

Things musical...

 The new season at University of Sheffield Concerts kicks off on 17th October with multi-award winning fiddler, composer and producer Aidan O'Rourke (Lau) and Mercury Prize nominee pianist Kit Downes, they will be performing from their latest album 365:Volume Two. Bold, tender, full of old truths and distilled modern wit, their music is built on the beauty of the miniature. Both the album and this concert are a collaboration between artists steeped in tradition but constantly breaking new ground. There a wide variety of musical events at the University which you can enjoy.

Things about gaming addiction...
Children and young adults who are seriously addicted to computer games will now be able to get help on the NHS after the launch of country’s first specialist clinic.The new service is part of the National Centre for Behavioural Addictions which will also provide support for internet addiction and is located alongside the National Problem Gambling Clinic. It comes amid growing concerns about the amount of time children and teenagers spend playing online games and the impact it can have on their mental health. The World Health Organization has recently classified gaming disorder as a mental health condition for the first time.
The new Centre for Internet and Gaming Disorders launches at the same time as the children and young person’s gambling addiction service goes live. The service will be hosted by the Central and North West London mental health trust and be located alongside the National Problem Gambling Clinic.

Things about children's wellbeing...
In a research report from Dept of Education,  'State of the nation 2019: children and young people’s wellbeing' the headline messages are:

  • The majority of children and young people are happy with their lives, but it remains the case that many are not.
  • Age is consistently associated with decreasing wellbeing in children and young people as they get older.
  • Looking at only average wellbeing may mask important differences in the experiences of different groups of children and young people, at different times in their lives
  • In their focus on psychological health in teenage girls they found that bullying, including online bullying, had the strongest association with their psychological health.
Things about Bobby Seagull...
University Challenge Star and the UK’s best-known Maths teacher, Bobby Seagull, becomes a CILIP Library Champion with the launch of his 10-point Manifesto for Libraries. This manifesto includes:
 Implement the recommendations of the independent Topol Review to enable librarians and knowledge specialists to transform evidence-based healthcare;
 You can see the range of services we offer to help you in your work on our website

Comfort food...
It is so miserable outside that I think a comfort food recipe is called for - but one that is relatively healthy! Pork & apple stew with parsley & thyme dumplings



Friday, 4 October 2019

Things in the library 4th October...

Things we have read...
We had an excellent reading group session this last week and the 'Contemporary Short Stories' scored  83%. We are starting to think about what books to read next year so if you want to get involved why not come along on 6th November for "Seven deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle" and put the December date (4th) in your diary - this is when we vote on what to read next. If you are interested in knowing about what we are reading, even if you can't attend, then ask us to put you on our distribution email list. I can also send you list of past reads or you can check them on our catalogue by searching for  "reading group".

Things about words...
With Sheffield's 'Off the Shelf' festival starting tomorrow (5-26 October) over 150 events to attend for all ages and interests. Some may be booked up but many will still be available everything from coal mines to wildflowers to book art - it really is a fantastic opportunity as it is one of the largest and most accessible literary festivals in the UK so do check the website.

Michael WestThings about culture and leadership...
Following on from one of the keynote speakers (Michael West) at last week's Clinical Summit these are the links to his resources Phase 1 and Phase 2- you can also find these via our library catalogue. If you know of online resources that would be useful for colleagues why not send us the links and we can add them to our catalogue to make them easier for people to find.

Things about social care ...
The Buurtzorg model of care, developed by a social enterprise in the Netherlands in 2006, involves small teams of nursing staff providing a range of personal, social and clinical care to people in their own homes in a particular neighbourhood. There’s an emphasis on one or two staff working with each individual and their informal carers to access all the resources available in their social networks and neighbourhood to support them to be more independent. In 2017 a group of NHS and local government organisations in West Suffolk, who had joined forces in a project to support older people to live independently at home, initiated a test-and-learn of the Buurtzorg model. They recruited a team of nurses and assistant practitioners to provide health and social care to people in line with the principles of the Buurtzorg model. The Fund has been working with this team to support them to learn about their experiences as they go along.

Things with cinnamon...
Cinnamon buns
Apparently today is Cinnamon bun day in Sweden & Finland (Kanelbullens dag) so if you needed an excuse...here is a recipe.

Friday, 27 September 2019

Things in the library 27 Sept...

Things out and about...
It was great to attend the Trust's Clinical Summit yesterday and meet so many people and put faces to names. Most of our services can be provided off-site either electronically or by us coming to your team which means we never actually meet in person many of our regular users . If you want us to help you please 'Book a Librarian'.
The keynote speakers were excellent and I think my favourite quote of the day was from Michael West who said "the culture of an organisation is what we do...when no-one is looking". Various books and resources were mentioned during the day and we hope to be able to buy some of these to add to the library.

Things colourful...

The NHS Rainbow Badges are being launched on Thurs 3rd Oct for all staff in the SCH Trust. The web page will be live on the intranet for staff to sign up to pledge their commitment to positivity, inclusivity and support for all LGBT+ young people and their families who we see in the Trust. If you complete the brief online learning package you can submit your form and will receive a Rainbow badge to wear. Nearly 100 acute Trusts in England have already launched. There will be a Rainbow Theo flag flying from the roof of the hospital from Thursday.

Things to have a say about...
The NHS in South Yorkshire and Bassetlaw would like to hear your views about a health information website they are thinking of developing for pregnant women, parents with children, young people and their families.  They understand how difficult it can be to get simple and trusted health and well-being information to support access to the right services.  They recognise that health and well-being information is vast which can lead to inconsistent messages about health in pregnancy and children's health. This sometimes leads to being directed to services (like A&E) when they are not necessarily the best place to be seen and treated.

Things about Open Access...
As part of Open Access Week ScHARR will be showing the film 'Paywall - The Business of Scholarship'  followed by an opportunity to ask any Open Access and publishing questions with Scholarly Communications Librarian Kate O'Neill. The film will start at about 12.10 and runs for 65 minutes in the University of Sheffield Pemberton Lecture Theatre B.
'Paywall: The Business of Scholarship' is a documentary which focuses on the need for open access to research and science. The film questions the rationale behind the $25.2 billion a year that flows into for-profit academic publishers, examines the 35-40% profit margin associated with the top academic publisher, Elsevier, and looks at how that profit margin is often greater than some of the most profitable tech companies such as Apple, Facebook, and Google.
Please feel free to take your own lunch. Sign up here SCH staff welcome to attend.

Things to attend...
Reading Group next week 2nd October 17:15 in the library when we will be talking about the book of 'Contemporary British Short Stories' we have been reading. Even if you haven't read the book do feel free to come along and join us - drinks and nibbles always available-. Our November book is 'The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle' by Stuart Turton.

Things to eat...
Vegan potato cake with chickpea curryAre you trying to eat less meat, or have you decided to be a vegitarian or vega?  Whatever your viewpoint ther are some lovely vegetarian and vegan recipes around that everyone can enjoy. These potato cakes with a chick pea curry sound nice, using left over potatoes.



Friday, 20 September 2019

Things in the library 20th Sept...


Things about obesity...
The Royal Society for Public Health has published Routing out childhood obesity.  This report outlines recommendations for transforming the street environment, particularly around schools, with the ambition that all children should have access to a healthy route home

Things about breastfeeding...
A significant increase in composite and non-verbal IQ at 5-years of age was associated with short-term breastfeeding. This study in Acta Paediatrica adds to a growing body of evidence that short-term breastfeeding promotes healthy cognitive development.



A new review on SEND...

The review aims to improve the services available to families who need support for children with additional needs, equip staff in schools and colleges to respond effectively to their needs as well as ending the ‘postcode lottery’ they often face. It will conclude with action to boost outcomes and improve value for money, so that vulnerable children have the same opportunities to succeed, as well as improving capacity and support for families across England.

Things for Early Years...
Save the Children UKSave the Children has published its Early Learning Communities Toolkit aimed at improving early learning for children growing up in poverty in communities across the UK. The charity’s mission for its UK work is to secure a sustainable reduction in the number of children growing up in poverty, and to narrow the early learning gap between children growing up in poverty in their better-off peers.

Things about autism...
National Autistic Society LogoA campaign 'Not Enough' has been launched by national Austistic Society based on the findings of an inquiry by the All Party Parliamentary Group on Autism (APPGA) and the National Autistic Society into the impact of the Autism Act, 10 years after its introduction. A survey of around 11,000 autistic adults and their families in England and evidence sessions in Parliament found that there is simply not enough care, support and understanding in our society for autistic people. This is having devastating consequences for autistic people: widespread isolation, mental health problems and people falling into crisis.



Things from the Children's Commissioner...
The Children’s Commissioner has published A manifesto for children.  The manifesto calls on Britain’s political parties to include a six-point plan in their election manifestos to transform the life chances for disadvantaged children and to help children to thrive. The key themes are: supporting stronger families, providing decent places for children to live, helping children to have healthy minds, keeping children active, providing SEND support for those who need it, and creating safer streets and play areas.



Things fresh and fruity...
It's great to see the fresh fruit and veg stall in front of the Royal hallamshire Hospital is continuing the thrive. It is open 8am to 4pm Monday - Friday and I find it very useful as I walk past in the morning. Hoping it might come to SCH soon too! Also the flower planters have been growing 'Pick your own' herbs all summer...though people are still putting their cigarette butts out in them 😖 but a great initiative - well done STH.

Things about mental health...
The Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership has published Mental healthcare in young people and young adults.  This review looks in detail at the mental healthcare provided to young people from the unique perspective of the overlap between physical and mental healthcare, the quality of physical and mental healthcare provided and how patients with mental health conditions use healthcare services.  The aim of this study was to identify areas of care that can be improved for all patients aged between 11 and 25 years.

Things autumn fruity...
(C) National Trust
So this weekend should be great to get out and pick some blackberries...or you can buy them if you prefer a less thorny occupation! This is what I shall be making this weekend - Blackberry and Apple Crumble.



Friday, 13 September 2019

Things in the library 13 Sept...

Things to browse...
We always have a trolley of second-hand books for sale in the library at reasonable prices. This is  made up of items which we have replaced with newer editions, feel free to come up and browse or check out this list. Please note if you are registered with the library we can reserve items for you by putting the cost on your library account - but note this is a commitment to buy.

Things about FGM...
Hundreds of survivors of female genital mutilation (FGM) will be able to access expert care, support and treatment earlier in a new network of NHS ‘one stop shop’ clinics being launched this week.
More than 1,300 women over 18 are expected to benefit from the highly specialised FGM support being rolled out to eight new centres across England as part of the NHS Long Term Plan. Typically, the NHS is first able to identify and begin to offer support to survivors of FGM when they are pregnant, through maternity services. Over the last three months almost 1,000 women and girls were identified as having been affected. The new network of FGM support clinics – opening in Birmingham, Bristol, London and Leeds – will aim to reach women before they are pregnant, providing those over the age of 18 with a range of services all under one roof. They will be led by specialist doctors, midwives and nurses, and provide access to specially-trained counsellors for emotional support, as well as FGM Health Advocates for advice on accessing other services locally.

Things about healthy lives...
A whole government approach to long-term investment in the nation’s health has been published by the Health Foundation. Life expectancy in the UK has been stalling since 2011, and there is an 18-year gap in healthy life expectancy between the least and most socioeconomically deprived populations. Fluctuations in government priorities, a tendency towards short-term political decision-making, and challenges in addressing complex dynamic issues, all lead to insufficient attention by government on creating the conditions for a healthy life. This publication makes the case for an ambitious, whole-government approach to long-term investment in the nation’s health. They recommend five shifts in the government’s overall approach to achieving this aim and outline how investment can be re-balanced towards areas of spending that maintain and improve health, such as early years services, housing and social security.

Things about physical activity...
Man doing strength exercises in gymNew physical activity guidelines have been issued by UK Chief Medical Officers. The guidelines emphasise the importance of building strength and balance for adults, and include recommendations for pregnant women, new mothers and disabled people.
Falls are the main reason older people are taken to A&E, and could be avoided through daily activities such as brisk walking, carrying heavy shopping, climbing stairs, swimming and gardening. There is strong evidence that physical activity protects against a range of chronic conditions. Meeting the guidelines can reduce the risk of:

  • type 2 diabetes by 40%
  • coronary heart disease by 35%
  • depression by 30%

The new guidelines are an update to those released in 2011, but the overall message remains the same: any activity is better than none, and more is better still. Under the new guidelines, adults are advised to undertake strength-based exercise at least 2 days a week. This can help delay the natural decline in muscle mass and bone density that starts from around age 50. It is believed that this is a major reason why older people lose their ability to carry out daily tasks.

New advice is also available to encourage good development in babies and children, with the UK Chief Medical Officers recommending lots of ‘tummy time’. As much active play as possible in children under 5 is encouraged, and older children are recommended to be active for an average of 60 minutes a day across the week. To support this, the government will work with nurseries to find fun opportunities for young children to exercise during the day through the new Daily Toddle initiative.

Things about health & social care...
HomeHealthwatch received reports of 17,269 people’s views and experiences of health and social care from their network between Apr to Jun 2019. This briefing highlights what the public are saying about primary care, secondary care and social care. They also take an in-depth look at why personalised care matters and how this can be applied to different sections of the community.

Things to make...
The Hairy Bikers seem to be off on their journeys again and this (not so healthy) wedge salad with blue cheese dressing featured on their latest TV programme ...sounds delicious though!






Friday, 6 September 2019

Things in the library 6th Sept...

Things about blindness...
A revolutionary new gene therapy which restores sight will be provided by the NHS, chief executive Simon Stevens has announced this week. Babies born with inherited retinal dystrophies disorder have poor sight which swiftly deteriorates, with most losing their vision completely in childhood. Until now no treatment has been available.
The life-changing treatment for children and adults – voretigene neparvovec – is the first in a new generation of gene therapies that can be directly administered to patients, in this case through an injection.

Things about respiratory health...
Public Health England have issued a report on respiratory diseases in the Yorkshire and the Humber population, highlighting examples of good practice and opportunities for improvement in both primary prevention and disease management. Respiratory diseases can have a substantial impact on quality of life and are responsible for 13.6% of all deaths in Yorkshire and the Humber.

Mental health in paediatric primary care...
Logo of missmedThe pediatric primary care setting is ideal for addressing children's and adolescents' mental health needs. As a result of extensive training in health promotion, consultation, assessment, and treatment of psychological disorders, psychologists are uniquely positioned to support primary care pediatricians in this endeavor. This paper 'I Get By With A Little Help From My Friends' provides a review of models of psychology interventions in pediatric primary care including: care delivery, scope of practice, implementation and recent research. It concludes with a case example and recommendations.

Things about work life balance...
Published in Acta Pediatrica is this progress report 'The Evolving Educational Challenge: Balancing Patient Numbers, Conference Attendance, Sleep and Resident Wellness.' which although written from an American perspective may well be of interest.

Things to attend...
The Brit Rock Film Tour 2019 World Premier takes place at 19.30 at the Pennine Lecture Theatre, Sheffield Hallam University, S1 2LW on 24th October 2019. With introductions by the filmmakers and climbers, free stuff, a chance to meet the rock stars and a film maker Q&A. It has all the best new climbing films from the UK’s top adventure filmmakers, featuring some of the country’s most popular climbers. Climbing Blind is a  60 mins documentary directed and produced by Alastair Lee, in association with Montane. Jesse Dufton was born with 20% central vision. At four years of age Jesse was diagnosed with Retinitis Pigmentosa: a rare genetic disease that breaks down the retinas’ cells. At aged 20 Jesse could no longer read, by the time he was 30 his vision was reduced to just light perception with around 1 or 2 % field of view. A life long climber, Jesse can more than hold his own, both lead-climbing classic routes that would challenge fully sighted climbers with his sight guide and fiancee Molly, to competing in world cup events (4th in 2019).  As his sight degenerates his climbing continues to make remarkable progress. Despite his condition, Jesse only takes on bigger challenges by attempting to be the first blind person to make a ‘non-sight’ lead of the iconic Old Man of Hoy sea stack in Scotland.

Things about health inequalities...
Inequities have a profound impact on the health and development of children globally. While inequities are greatest in the world's poorest countries, even in rich nations poorer children have poorer health and developmental outcomes. From birth through childhood to adolescence, morbidity, mortality, growth and development are socially determined, resulting in the most disadvantaged having the highest risk of poor health outcomes. Inequities in childhood impact across the life course. This article in BMJ Paediatrics Open discusses these issues.

Things about street food...
No photo description available.Sheffield Students Union Street Food Market will be taking place just down the road from the Acute SCH site on 26 September from 17:30 till 22:30








Things about automation...
This graphic from the Health Foundation is about which health care jobs are the most likely to be affected by automation? The automation of work will impact the future labour market.

  • Office for National Statistics (ONS) analysis suggests that 7.4% of jobs in England are at high risk of automation (defined as 70% chance of being automated). 
  • The ONS analysis estimates that medical practitioners have an 18% probability of automation, compared to over 50% probability for care workers and home carers.
  • However there is optimism about opportunities technology could bring too, such as creating new roles. There are also limits to the tasks that technology can perform—human skills, intelligence and perception are likely to be of enduring value.
Bar chart showing risk of automation by job type

An item I won't be telling my mother-in-law... about given her lifelong phobia about robots.

Coffee opportunities...
Don't forget to sign up for the two Randomised Coffee trials available for SCH staff. One for all staff in October and one for those attending the SCH Clinical Summit.
More things about coffee...
I am not really a cake maker but for the evening reception of my son's wedding recently I was asked to make a coffee cake. It was well received (thanks Mary Berry) so I pass on the recipe...sunflowers optional...they were to match the bride's bouquet! I used more butter icing than stated in order to cover the sides as well. On the hottest August bank holiday fortunately the venue was air-conditioned otherwise both I and the cake might have melted!


Friday, 30 August 2019

Things in the library 30 August...

Things about coffee...
Illingworth Library has been asked to run one of our Randomised Coffee Trial events during the long lunch break at the SCH Clinical Summit on 26th September.
We will also be running one of our normal RCTs for all SCH staff during October
Coffee @ Clinical Summit
If you sign-up for the RCT you will be randomly matched (2 weeks beforehand) to another member of staff attending the SCH Clinical Summit and we will ask you to arrange to meet each other during the lunch break at the summit for a coffee (or tea!) and chat. You can talk about anything you like ….it doesn't have to be a job related …but it can be.
Why?
It’s a good way to meet new colleagues, make connections and find out more about each other.
How?
Sign up with this quick Google Form before 11th September if you would like to take part.

Coffee RCT @SCH 
If you want to sign-up for the normal SCH October RCT then please use this link to a Google Form and do so before 17th September. If you signed up previously for one of these and had asked to be kept on the list then there is no need to sign up for this one again.

Things about motor development...
A paper in Acta Paediatrica looks at 'Predictors of early motor trajectories from birth to 5 years in neonatal at-risk and control children.'. If you are a member of SCH staff you are entitled to read the full text of this by logging in here with your NHS Open Athens account. If you don't have an Open Athens account sign up for one here to access a variety of different electronic resources from database searching to e-books.

Things about smoking, drinking & drug use...

The report from national statistics 'Smoking, Drinking and Drug Use among Young People in England 2018' has been published. This report contains results from a biennial survey of secondary school pupils in England in years 7 to 11 (mostly aged 11 to 15), focusing on smoking, drinking and drug use. It covers a range of topics including prevalence, habits, attitudes, and for the first time in 2018, wellbeing.
The summary states that:
16% of pupils who had ever smoked cigarettes which was down from 19% in 2016, and 49% in 1996
Pupils who had drunk alcohol in the last week varied from 2% of 11 year olds and 3% of 12 year olds, to 23% of 15 year olds.
Pupils who had reported that they had ever taken drugs varied from 9% of 11 year olds, to 38% of 15 year olds
Low life satisfaction was reported by 33% of pupils who had taken drugs in the last month, and 28% of pupils who had drunk alcohol in the last week.

Things in Sheffield...
Booking opened this morning for Sheffield's Off the Shelf Festival which takes place in October. the popular 'big names' usually get booked up quickly but there are many different events taking place which are well worth attending. Tickets can be bought online, by phone or you can buy tickets in person from one of their box offices:
SIV Tickets, Sheffield City Hall, Barker's Pool
Sheffield Theatres, 55 Norfolk Street
University of Sheffield Students' Union, Western Bank

Things to read...
I am off to Salford this weekend to see Stephen Fry in 'Mythos' which we read earlier this year in our Reading Group. Our next meeting is Wed 4th September at where we will be chatting about 'The Power'...do come and join us in the library at 17:15.


Things to eat...
British plums are in the shops now so make the most of them. For something different from the normal crumble or cobbler what about this salad of roasted plums and spinach?