Friday, 20 April 2018

Things in the library 20th April...

Things about mental health...
A new report from YoungMinds warns that while there is growing awareness about children and young people’s mental health, it is still far too difficult for young people with mental health problems to get the help they need. The #FightingFor report, which is being published to mark the charity’s 25th anniversary, shows that while most people believe that there is less stigma about mental health than there used to be, young people and parents face a huge range of barriers to finding the right support.

Things about critical appraisal...
Sarah will be running her next Critical Appraisal course for SCH staff on 14th May 9.30 - 13.00 - you need to book a place on this via Course Bookings on the intranet. You will learn how to critically appraise healthcare information and to understand why this is important. No previous knowledge required and free of charge but booking essential as it will not run unless there are sufficient attendees.

ScHARR  is running  a 1 day course on 8th May Instant Evidence Based Medicine: How to Critically Appraise Research . This course will look at how to understand and appraise research articles. You will learn how to quickly read a paper and grasp its key findings, how to interpret and understand key data, how to appraise a paper’s methods and assess its usefulness and value. You will look at ‘internal validity’ - how close the research has got to the ‘truth’, and ‘external validity’ - can the research be usefully applied in your own work situation? Overall the course aims to help you become a better user of research. Bookings will automatically close at midnight on Wednesday, 25th April 2018 cost £399

Things about transition services...
An article from Canadian Family Physician journal seeks to demonstrate how family physicians can contribute to a piece of the journey of improving quality-of-life outcomes for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) when they undergo the transition from adolescence to adulthood.





Things about obesity...

The article  'Family Functioning and Childhood Obesity Treatment: a Family Systems Theory-Informed Approach.' in Academic Pediatrics provides the background and evidence for use of FST, detail how families organise around weight-related behaviours that contribute to obesity, and based on their organisation what type of treatment may be beneficial, FST-informed or family-based behavioural interventions. Finally, a suggested family-based clinical algorithm is provided detailing the use of FST through assessment, intervention, and follow-up that can be refined over time by providers and researchers committed to viewing obesity in the context of the family and family dynamics.

Things about fruit juice...
Whether or not drinking 100% fruit juice causes poor health is controversial. Although 100% fruit juice may contain as much sugar as regular soda, it provides needed nutrients to diets. This article in Advances in Nutrition systematically reviews the current evidence of the association of 100% fruit juice consumption and chronic health conditions in children and adults. They focused on data from systematic reviews and meta-analyses about cardiometabolic health outcomes, liver disease, and caries. They conclude that aside from increased risk of tooth decay in children and small amounts of weight gain in young children and adults, there is no conclusive evidence that consumption of 100% fruit juice has adverse health effects. Guidelines from groups like the American Academy of Pediatrics and Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommending that 100% fruit juice may be consumed in moderation are consistent with the available evidence and should be used to inform food policies.

Things to eat...

With the welcome return of the sun this week, I thought I would pick Minted melon, tomato & prosciutto salad today and it's particularly useful to those of us without kitchens at the moment!

Friday, 13 April 2018

Things in the library 13th April...

Things up North...
A report from the Children's commissioner 'Growing up North - Look north: a generation of children await the powerhouse promise' has been published. This report is not seeking to reinforce old narratives of wholesale northern decline. However, it is also important to understand that a disproportionate number of children in the North are growing up in communities of entrenched disadvantage which have not enjoyed the financial growth or government energy and spotlight that have so boosted opportunities in other areas of the country – London and the South East in particular.
As a result, too many disadvantaged children in the North are being left behind.
This report sets out starkly what this means:

  • Too many children starting school far behind where they should be. Often with special educational needs no one has picked up.
  • Children from disadvantaged backgrounds facing an education gap that starts before schools and widens throughout education
  • More than half of the secondary schools serving the North’s most deprived communities are judged to be less than good.
  • Large numbers of children dropping out of education before they reach 18.
  • Lack of confidence amongst children that economic regeneration will mean more jobs or opportunities. 
Things to read...
The next Reading group will be on 2nd May at 17:15 in the Illingworth Library. The book we will be discussing is Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde. Written in his distinctively dazzling manner, Oscar Wilde’s story of a fashionable young man who sells his soul for eternal youth and beauty is the author’s most popular work. Of Dorian Gray’s relationship to autobiography, Wilde noted in a letter, “Basil Hallward is what I think I am: Lord Henry what the world thinks me: Dorian what I would like to be—in other ages, perhaps.”
Come and join us after work for a relaxed chat about books - along with drinks and nibbles.


.....and things to buy
We have just refilled our 'books for sale' trolley with  old editions that we have replaced recently. Many of these are well worth buying at a fraction of the cost of the new editions so come up and browse or ask us to send you the list of titles available.








Things about our health...
The Health Foundation ( an independent charity committed to bringing about better health and health care for people in the UK) has published a quick guide: 'What makes us healthy? : an introduction to the social determinants of health' - this has been written for anyone with an interest in people's health and well-being.









Things to attend...
A lecture on about patient choice on Thursday 19th April 13:00 at the University of Sheffield  Elmfield Building, Lecture Theatre 1, S10 2TU given by Merran Toerien, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Sociology at the University of York. In this talk, she engages critically with the RCS guidelines on consent on the basis of her analysis of over 200 recorded neurology outpatient consultations together with self-report data collected pre- and post-recording. Her aim is not to suggest a return to a paternalistic conceptualisation of the doctor-patient relationship, but rather to highlight some problems inherent in proposing ‘informed choice’ as necessarily the best alternative to paternalism. Further information

A lecture on well-being in organisations on 18th April 17:00-19:00 Middleton Lecture Theatre Sheffield University Management School. The aim of organisational interventions is to improve employee health and well-being through changing the way work is organised, designed and managed. Controversy exists as to the effectiveness of this type of interventions as some argue interventions targeting the individual may be more effective. Professor Nielsen argues that in order to understand how these interventions work we need to move beyond the question of “what works?” to “what works for whom under which circumstances?”. In doing so, we need to focus on the processes of such interventions and the conditions in the context that may support these processes. Further information.

Things to eat...
Microwave jambalayaI have been without a kitchen for the last 2 weeks so I am having to be inventive with a microwave! I think I shall be trying this Microwave jambalaya out next week - don't expect it will be as good as 'proper' cooking but surely better than a ready meal!





















Friday, 6 April 2018

Things in the library 9 April

Tough things..
Plans for the NHS in the coming year look impossible to deliver despite comments from the prime minister on long term NHS funding, according to a detailed analysis by NHS Providers.

The report Tough Task: The NHS delivering for patients and staff in 2018/19 presents a stark and worrying assessment of the challenges facing NHS trusts this coming financial year.
The report reveals widespread scepticism about the ability of the service to meet performance and financial targets in 2018/19.

Things about weight perception..
A study in the Lancet in 2017 described the global trends in the prevalence of obesity, overweight and underweight in children, adolescents and adults from 1975 to 2016. Parent's play a vital role in controlling children's weight and one important aspect is how parents perceive their children's weight status. They must be aware of any growth deviations in their children, such overweight or obesity, in order to take action. This editorial in Acta Paediatrica discusses papers relevant to this issue.


Things working closer together..

NHS England and NHS Improvement have revealed their intention to work much more closely together to maximise efficiencies and reduce duplication.
From September 2018 (subject to board approval), the groups intend to increase integration and alignment of national programmes and activities, led by one team where possible, as well as integration of NHS England and NHS Improvement regional teams, to be led in each case by one regional director working for both organisations.
Details of the proposals are available here.

Things on the move..
Thousands of runners will be taking part in the Asda Foundation Sheffield Half Marathon this Sunday 8th April. With a city centre start and finish, the event boasts a super scenic route with stunning views of the Peak District for those who conquer the climb to Ringinglow. 
Check the route for where road closures will be. 

Things from Madeira
Sarah has just returned from the island and discovered some interesting things..

The famous Madeira cake is not from Madeira.  It was named after Madeira wine, invented in the 1800s and often served with it.

The recipe can be found here




Madeirans produce their own traditional cake - bolo de mel, a dark, spicy, honey cake.  It is similar to an English Christmas cake and has great depth of flavour.

The recipe can be found here




Madeira wine is produced in a variety of styles ranging from dry wines which can be consumed on their own as an aperitif to sweet wines usually consumed with dessert. Cheaper cooking versions are often flavoured with salt and pepper for use in cooking, but these are not fit for consumption as a beverage.





Friday, 23 March 2018

Things in the library 23 March...


A really useful thing ...

The library has managed to secure funding from Health Education England for a 1 year subscription to Dynamed Plus.  This is a resource similar to BMJ Best practice and UpToDate.

"DynaMed Plus is the next-generation clinical resource that healthcare professionals can rely on for fast, easy access to the latest evidence-based medical information. Written by a world-class team of physicians and researchers, content is updated several times daily to include synthesized, objective and peer-reviewed information on thousands of topics in a variety of medical specialties. Content includes information on specific diseases, conditions, treatments and drugs pertaining to emergency medicine, cardiology, oncology, pediatrics and more. "
Access is available in multiple ways:

  • A quick link on the trust intranet home page. (make sure you are logged into the Internet) 
  • A quick link on the library website (you will need an OpenAthens account) 
  • A mobile app 
If you have any problems using Dynamed Plus or have any questions, please contact the library. Please bring this resource to the attention of anyone you feel may want to use it at SCH.


Things about looked after children...


"Similar but different - responding to the health needs of unique children" - CoramBAAF Health Group conference  2 July Birmingham. Looked after and adopted children are frequently referred to as a homogenous group with a defined set of difficulties and needs. Yet practitioners know how much every child that they meet is different. Each child has a unique set of circumstances, their own story, specific strengths and personal challenges.

Producing comprehensive, holistic health assessments and individual, meaningful and responsive health plans that address children's on-going needs is a constant challenge.This conference includes a diverse range of topics and speakers - reflecting the rich, varied, confusing and demanding world of working with the unique children that are in care or have been adopted.

Things about safeguarding...
A useful briefing (via NSPCC) about changes to data protection with regard to safeguarding.
The new amendment 85, adopted by the House of Commons Public Bill Committee on Tuesday 13 March, goes further in empowering organisations – in the course of their own activities and judgment – to process personal data for safeguarding purposes lawfully, without consent where appropriate. This will be welcome news for schools, charities and volunteer organisations, religious organisations and sports clubs and governing bodies alike.


....and data protection relating to children

In this latest General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) consultation, the Information Commissioner (ICO) has its sights set on organisations that handle the personal data of minors. It is not aimed specifically at schools, and – given the variety of organisations that deal with children in many sectors – producing one-size-fits-all guidance was never going to be an easy task. This briefing will give you an overview.



Things about mental health services for children & young people...

The NSPCC has published a Local transformation plan toolkit with guidance on how to design and deliver mental health services for children and young people who have been abused. The toolkit and guidance follows the annual analysis of Local transformation plans looking at how the needs of these children and young people are considered in the commissioning of services. The toolkit aims to help commissioners and other stakeholders understand how their plans can better meet the mental health needs of children and young people who have been abused. Key criteria and best practice themes include: recognising that some groups of children are more vulnerable to mental health problems than the wider population, including children who have been abused and children in care; carrying out a needs analysis of vulnerable groups using a range of sources; providing evidence-based services for vulnerable groups.

Things about international comparisons...

The Nuffield Trust has issued a report on International comparisons of health and wellbeing in early childhood. How do health outcomes for babies and young children in the UK compare with other similar countries on key measures such as immunisation, birth weight, mortality rates, breastfeeding and obesity? The findings show that while the UK is doing well in many areas relating to

the health of young children, on certain indicators the UK lags far behind
similarly developed countries. In others, where once we led the field, our
rate of improvement has slowed to the extent that we have among the worst
outcomes in comparable countries.


The first egg...


Since they first bred in 2012, the Peregrines of St George's have become an established feature of Sheffield's skyscape, enjoyed by many across the city and well beyond. The first egg has been laid...catch up on the live webcam.


Things that are happening...



Reading group will be meeting on 4th April at 17:15 where the book being discussed is The Pianist by Wladyslaw Szpilman  drinks and nibbles served and you are welcome to join us whether you have read the book or not!

There are many performances and events at the University of Sheffield which are open to the public - check out what's on .



Things not happening next week...
We are closed Good Friday and Easter Monday so the blog will not be posted next week. We will also be closing at 17:00 on Tuesday 27 March and Thursday 5th April due to staff holiday
We hope you all have a Happy Easter and a nice break (if you aren't working!)



Things to eat...
Finally time to buy the hot cross buns that have been in the shops since New Year...and if you buy too many then you have the excuse of making this bread and butter pudding!


Friday, 16 March 2018

Things in the library 16 March...

Things to trust...
The YouGov poll of adults in Great Britain shows:
- 66% agree that it is harder than ever to find trustworthy information.
- 84% agree that they trust information more when it is given by a professional.
- 90% agree that it is important to educate people on how to find trustworthy information.
- Medical staff topped the list, with 74% of British adults saying they thought they would provide trustworthy information, followed by teachers and police officers (both at 49%), librarians (46%) and lawyers (39%). Bottom of the list were politicians, with 2% of respondents saying they thought they would provide trustworthy information. We can help you find reliable information via our 'Book a Librarian' service.

Things about NHS priorities...
This editorial in BMJ says the NHS must prioritise health of children and young people as our future health and prosperity depend on it. Children and young people are a quarter of our population but 100% of our future. Our moral obligation to promote children’s health is clear within UK law and in the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. Furthermore, 94% of adult Britons believe children’s health should be a priority for the NHS. Despite this, the low priority that UK health systems give to children suggests we must marshal other arguments to convince policy makers. Children and young people aged 0-19 years are the workforce of the 2020s and the parents of the next generation. Their health will be one of the factors deciding whether the UK is prosperous after 2019. Countries that invest in child health reap impressive economic rewards, with each pound spent on children’s health returning over £10 to society over a lifetime. The converse is that poor health in childhood leads to reduced workforce participation and productivity and lowers national wealth

Things about coping under pressure...
The Royal College of Physicians’ (RCP’s) NHS reality check: Delivering care under pressure reports gives over 2,100 doctors and NHS teams, who are overwhelmed by rising levels of demand in hospitals, a voice on how their profession is coping. It returns to last year's key report and once again gives over 1,500 doctors working in the NHS the chance to discuss their experiences of delivering care in the UK health service. The key finding for the 2018 update was that conditions had got worse and NHS staff, who have benefited from some of the best medical education in the world, were not able to provide the standard of care they have been trained to deliver.


Things to come and join in...
Journal Club next week is on Tuesday 20th March at 13:00 to 14:00 in Clinical Skills centre F Floor Stephenson Wing. The article being discussed is 'Are three malaria tests necessary in children returning from the tropics with fever?' Please contact us if you would like a copy of the paper. Home made muffins provided.






Things historic...

This year is the 70th anniversary of the NHS. If you know of someone from Sheffield Children's Hospital whose groundbreaking research has led to a significant difference to the care of our patients ...whether 70 years ago or more recently... please let  Gill  know. We would like to find out more about them and their work.


Things warm and comforting...
Nothing like a good beef stew for a cold weekend like this one from Mary Berry





......
or if you want a vegetarian option...Butternut squash and root veg hotpot


Friday, 9 March 2018

Things in the library 9th March...

Things doubled up...
If you come up to the library to use our computers don't be surprised if you are seeing double. Thanks to a successful bid for funding from HEE we have been able to provide two screens for each of the NHS computers. If you have worked with two screens you will know how useful it is to have, for example, a spreadsheet open on one and a Word document on another at the same time. If you are not sure how to do this please ask any of the library staff for help.

Things about mental health...
The CQC report their findings of their independent review of the system of services that support children and young people’s mental health. Are we listening? full report and summary are available here. 
Their recommendations are:

  • The Secretary of State for Health and Social Care should make sure there is joint action across government to make children and young people’s mental health a national priority, working with ministers in health, social care, education, housing and local government
  • Local organisations must work together to deliver a clear ‘local offer’ of the care and support available to children and young people
  • Government, employers and schools should make sure that everyone that works, volunteers or cares for children and young people are trained to encourage good mental health and offer basic mental health support
  • Ofsted should look at what schools are doing to support children and young people’s mental health when they inspect

Things to attend...
Two ScHARR courses in Sheffield.
Experiential Research Approaches (ERA): Qualitative Methods using Observation, Description and Interpretation  2 day course - Thursday 28th - Friday 29th June 2018 Early Bird Booking rate closes 29th April 2018. Standard Booking closes 13th June 2018.
Cluster Randomised Trials Design and Analysis 1 day course - Wednesday 4th July 2018 Early Bird Booking rate closes 6th May 2018. Standard Booking closes 20th June 2018.


Things about obesity...
Children who eat takeaways once or more each week have more body fat and higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL) “bad” cholesterol levels than those who never or hardly ever eat them. Their diets were also higher in fat and lower in protein and calcium. This cross-sectional study looked in depth at eating habits and risk markers for coronary heart disease, obesity and diabetes in 2,529 children in England. Though this type of study can only show an association between takeaways and risk markers, it is one of the first of its type, and the results do give cause for concern. Increasing numbers of people are eating takeaways in the UK. Local authorities and healthcare professionals are well placed to encourage parents and children to choose healthier foods, in line with current national guidance.

Things about abuse...
Getting help to overcome abuse A quick guide for young people receiving support published by NICE is available online. This guide has been written by young people who have experienced abuse or neglect. 15 young people from around the country were supported by AVA to help develop the NICE guideline on child abuse and neglect. They did this by talking about their experiences of seeking help and support, including sharing the challenges they faced as well as what worked well. When the guideline was finished, they wanted to write a quick guide to help other young people find out what support they are entitled to.

Things about child health...
The government has published the Child Health profiles for 2018 which provide an overview of child health and wellbeing for each local authority in England. Those working in local government and health services can use the profiles as a tool to help:

  • understand the needs of their communities
  • improve the health and wellbeing of children and young people
  • reduce health inequalities

Things new in the library...
Quite a few new books hitting the shelves of the library this week. If you want to be notified when books matching your subject interests are bought please let us know. If you have suggestions for books or e-books you think we should have then get in touch. if you want to see the latest books then check this link on our catalogue.  If a book is 'processing' but not yet available it can be reserved for you.

Things to read...
Next months Reading Group will be on Wed 4th April so pop the date in your diaries the book to read is 'The Pianist' by Wladyslaw Szpilman. The powerful and bestselling memoir of a young Jewish pianist who survived the war in Warsaw against all odds.


and things to eat...
How about some Polish sausage and red cabbage - this dish could be a main or a side dish.  Rosemary braised red cabbage with kabanos takes long slow cooking but is really easy to prepare.

Friday, 2 March 2018

Things in the library 2 March...

Things snowy...
We have remained open throughout the bad weather and have had several waifs and strays working here if they can't get to their normal workplace. We sell hot drinks and biscuits and provide a spectacular view across the snowy rooftops of Sheffield.

Things to discuss...
Reading group next week on Wednesday 7th March 17:15 in the library. Drinks and nibbles and discussing a book about Eyam.
Come and join us.

Things about statistics...
We are often asked for help with statistics (which we are unable to do) but we have just bought a new book 'Statistics at square two' which is a companion to 'Statistics at square one'. This book aims to help you to evaluate the many statistical methods in current use and is aimed at all those who need to understand statistics in clinical research papers and apply them in their own research.

Things about the NHS...
The King's Fund has published results and trends from the British Social Attitudes survey which  has asked members of the public about their views on, and feelings towards, the NHS and health and care issues generally. The latest survey was carried out between July and October 2017 and asked a nationally representative sample of 3,004 adults in England, Scotland and Wales about their satisfaction with the NHS overall, and 1,002 people about their satisfaction with individual NHS and social care services. They conclude that :
"looking at the 2017 data through that long-view lens reminds us that overall NHS satisfaction levels remain higher than they were in the 1990s and early-to-mid-2000s. Nevertheless, the statistically significant fall in satisfaction (and rise in dissatisfaction) in 2017 took net satisfaction to its lowest level since 2007. With an increase over the last few years in the proportion of survey respondents reporting lack of funding as a reason for their dissatisfaction, it seems the public is increasingly aware of the reality of funding pressures that the NHS has experienced over the last seven years. With equally small increases in funding planned over the next few years and NHS performance on key headline measures worsening, it is hard to see the public’s satisfaction with the NHS improving in the near future."

Things about kiwis...
A recent article in European Journal of Nutrition reviews the nutritional and health attributes of kiwifruit. The review includes a brief history of green and gold varieties of kiwifruit from an ornamental curiosity from China in the 19th century to a crop of international economic importance in the 21st century; comparative data on their nutritional composition, particularly the high and distinctive amount of vitamin C; and an update on the latest available scientific evidence from well-designed and executed human studies on the multiple beneficial physiological effects.
Of particular interest are the digestive benefits for healthy individuals as well as for those with constipation and other gastrointestinal disorders, including symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. The mechanisms of action behind the gastrointestinal effects, such as changes in faecal (stool) consistency, decrease in transit time and reduction of abdominal discomfort, relate to the water retention capacity of kiwifruit fibre, favourable changes in the human colonic microbial community and primary metabolites, as well as the naturally present proteolytic enzyme actinidin, which aids protein digestion both in the stomach and the small intestine. The effects of kiwifruit on metabolic markers of cardiovascular disease and diabetes are also investigated, including studies on glucose and insulin balance, bodyweight maintenance and energy homeostasis.

Things about blockchain...
Do you know your Bitcoin from your Ethereum...and the possible implications for this technology for healthcare? If not this article from the Emerging Technology Group at NHS HEE may help you understand.

Things about health services for children...
A framework to support challenged children and young people’s health services achieve a good or outstanding CQC rating has been published. This framework supports and enables senior children and young people’s nurses to achieve good and outstanding care standards for children and young people’s health services. It integrates policy guidance with the most frequent reasons the Care Quality Commission (CQC) gives for rating children’s services as ‘requiring improvement’ or ‘inadequate’ as identified in our review of CQC reports.

Things about fish...
In Pediatric Allergy and Immunology a study by a group in Sweden suggested that toddlers who eat fish at least once a month  or live on a farm are less likely to develop hay fever in later childhood.
Eating fish once a month or more at age 12 months reduced the risk of allergic rhinitis at 12 years (0.70, 0.50-0.98) as did living on a farm with farm animals at four years (0.51, 0.32-0.84). Continuous farm living from age 4 to 12 seemed to drive the association. They concluded that Allergic rhinitis affected more than 20% of 12-year-olds, but was lower in children who ate fish at 12 months or grew up with farm animals.

Things about oral health...
A report on  the oral health survey of 5-year-olds in Yorkshire and the Humber in 2015, as part of the National Dental Epidemiology Programme for England, has been published. Yorkshire and The Humber remains the second worst region in the country for the proportion of five-year-olds with experience of tooth decay. However, the results show a continued decrease in the proportion of children with tooth decay (prevalence) and a decrease in severity of decay (the number of teeth with decay) at a regional level and at a local authority level for most areas. More five-year-old children have had teeth removed (extracted) due to tooth decay in the Yorkshire and The Humber than any other region in England.

Things to eat...
This is a fabulously easy dessert which I have made several times...and of course it features kiwi fruit.