Friday, 16 June 2017

Things in the library 16 June

Things about healthy eating...
A new survey commissioned by Diabetes UK has found that 66 per cent of adults eat three or fewer portions of fruit and/ or vegetables a day- well below the recommended five portions- and 46 per cent won't eat any fruit at least three days a week.




Regulatory things...
Care Quality Commission (CQC) are consulting on a further set of proposals which will help shape the next phase of regulation of health and social care in England. For the next eight weeks anyone with an interest is encouraged to have their say.  

The proposals include:

  • Changes to the regulation of primary medical services including the frequency and intensity of CQC's inspections 
  • Improvements to the structure of registration and CQC's defintion of 'registered providers' 
  • Further information on how CQC will monitor, inspect and rate new models of care and large or complex providers


Child dental health things...

This resource produced by Public Health England outlines how health professionals can help prevent tooth decay in children under 5 as part of ensuring every child has the best start in life. 


New things in the Library... 


Meena Balasubramanian, from Sheffield Children's Hospital Clinical Genetics Department has published the following book ...Clinical and Molecular Heterogeneity of Osteogenesis Imperfecta. It is now available in the Library.

The library regularly replaces the book stock and there are a number of new titles available. A selection is shown below but the complete list can be seen on the library catalogue.


Things to be aware of... Female Genital Mutilation...
NHS Digital has published an experimental statistics report on female genital mutilation (FGM)  in England for the period January- March 2017. Figures show there were 2,102 attendances reported at NHS trusts and GP practices where FGM was identified or a procedure for FGM was undertaken. Barnardo's children's charity is also providing advice to professionals of the signs that a girl may be a risk of undergoing FGM as 'cutting season' approaches.


Things about returning to practice...

The Health and Care Professions Council's guide provides information for professionals returning to practice after a break of more than two years.

It's a wrap! Yorkshire pudding things...
Try this Yorkshire Pudding wrap  from the BBC Good Food website for a change to the traditional Sunday dinner classic! Follow the recipe or watch the video.

Friday, 9 June 2017

Things in the library 9 June...

Things about cystic fibrosis...
An article in European J Pediatrics was published this week on 'Factors associated with changes in health-related quality of life in children with cystic fibrosis during 1-year follow-up' the authors conclude:

"In the group as a whole, HRQoL improved significantly over time. However, changes over time were significantly influenced by age: below 12 years of age, HRQoL improved in most patients whereas a deterioration was observed in most children >12 years. Strategies how to preserve or ideally to improve HRQoL in adolescence should be developed"


Things about antibiotics...

The World Health Organisation has released the latest edition of its essential medicines list which is updated every two years. WHO has grouped antibiotics into three groups—access, watch, and reserve—indicating which can be used for common infections and which should only be used in rare circumstances.

  • WHO recommends that antibiotics in the access group, which includes amoxicillin, be available at all times to treat common conditions.
  • The watch group includes antibiotics that are recommended as first or second choice treatments for a small number of infections. In this group are ciprofloxacin to treat cystitis and upper respiratory tract infections which, WHO says, should be dramatically reduced to avoid further development of resistance.
  • The third group, reserve, includes antibiotics that should be considered last resort options and used only when all other drugs have failed, such as for life threatening infections from multidrug resistant bacteria. The antibiotics colistin and some cephalosporins should only be used when all other treatments have failed in a bid to combat anti-microbial resistance

Things about chronic illness...
Serious chronic illness can have a detrimental effect on school attendance, participation and engagement, leaving affected students at risk of failing to meet their developmental potential. An improved understanding of factors that help to explain or mitigate this risk can help educators and health professionals deliver the most effective support. This meta-review 'Understanding the school experiences of children and adolescents with serious chronic illness: a systematic meta-review.' critiqued the available evidence examining the link between six chronic illnesses (asthma, cancer, chronic kidney diseases, heart diseases, cystic fibrosis and gastrointestinal diseases) and children's and adolescents' school experiences and outcomes, as well as investigating the medical, school, psychosocial and sociodemographic factors that are linked to poorer or better school outcomes.

Things to read...
If you didn't manage to make it to our  Reading Group this week now is the time to start reading the next book 'Elizabeth is Missing' for our meeting on Wed 5th July at 17:15.  Our last book 'Black Diamonds' scored 67% from the group.
'Elizabeth is missing', reads the note in Maud's pocket in her own handwriting. Lately, Maud's been getting forgetful. She keeps buying peach slices when she has a cupboard full, forgets to drink the cups of tea she's made and writes notes to remind herself of things. But Maud is determined to discover what has happened to her friend, Elizabeth, and what it has to do with the unsolved disappearance of her sister Sukey, years back, just after the war.'

Things to see...
At the Graves Gallery, above the Central Library in Sheffield  (next to the Lyceum), they have an exhibition entitled 'An Earthly Paradise: Gardens in Art' which explores the diverse ways artists have represented these uniquely personal spaces in their work.
The exhibition sees the return of a major work to the city, Stanley Spencer’s Zacharias and Elizabeth (1913-14). The painting, co-owned with Tate, goes on display alongside highlights from Sheffield’s visual art and Ruskin collections, including paintings and works on paper by Paul Cézanne, James Tissot, Evelyn Dunbar and more. The exhibition is on until 12th August and is open Tuesday - Saturday 11am - 4pm  (Wednesdays 1pm – 6pm), entry free.

Things to hear...
At the City Hall on Friday 30th June there is a concert 'The Music of James Bond with The Hallé' , the greatest themes and songs of 007 ...listen to the sounds that gave musical voice to the films in catchy title sequences and haunting songs performed by vocalists Alison Jiear and Matthew Ford with the Hallé orchestra.

Things to taste...
With the elderflowers coming into bloom I think we are going to attempt an elderflower gin this weekend at home! If I have enough flowers left I might try these fritters too.



Friday, 2 June 2017

Things in the library 2 June

Things being monitored...NHS Performance.
This is the 23rd report by the King's Fund and aims to take stock of what has happened over the past quarter and to assess the state of the health and care system. It provides an update on how the NHS is coping as it continues to grapple with productivity and reform challenges under continued financial pressure. Read the report here.

Ultra tough things
The BBC reports that US scientists have re-engineered a vital antibiotic in a bid to wipe out one of the world's most threatening superbugs. It fights bacteria in three different ways, making it much less likely that the bugs can dodge the attack. It is yet to be tested in animals and people, however. The Scripps Research Institute team hope the drug will be ready for use within five years if it passes more tests.

Hot and cold things..
The BBC reports that Washing hands in cold water 'as good as hot'. US scientists say they have poured cold water on the theory that washing hands with hot water kills more germs than unheated water. The small study of 20 people found using water at 15C (59F) left hands as clean as water heated to 38C (100F). The report, in the Journal of Food Protection, suggests this could help cut electricity bills in restaurants. In the UK, NHS experts say people can use cold or hot water to wash their hands. They say hands should be washed for at least 20 seconds and stress the importance of using enough soap to cover the whole surface of the hands. Their guidance focuses on rubbing hands together in various ways to make sure each surface of each hand is clean. 

Things about emergency asthma care
Joined-up solutions are needed to provide asthma care faster as EDs struggle to meet standards, according to a new audit by the Royal College of Emergency Medicine. The report published 26 May audited 14,043 children and adults with moderate and acute severe asthma presenting to 201 Emergency Departments (ED).  It shows that many EDs are finding it challenging to adhere to the time standards set by the British Thoracic Society and RCEM. It is thought that this, in part, reflects the increasing demands on EDs with higher volumes of patients with increasingly complex health needs.

Stylish things...
Style Sheffield is here! As part of Sheffield BID’s Alive After Five campaign, city centre businesses are hosting a series of stylish events from the 1st to the 8th June. Join independent boutiques and your favourite high-street brands for a week of VIP shopping,demonstrations and fashion shows. Don't worry, there are still a few tickets left so don't miss out, check out the programme of bookable, free events being held 1 - 8 June. There's a few fringe activities as well. View the programme here.

Marinated things..
This smoky roasted veg, marinated feta and lime dish looks great for summer evening meal.







Friday, 26 May 2017

Things in the library 26 May...

Things for deaf children...
To coincide with Deaf Awareness Week, Childline has launched a video for deaf or hard of hearing children and young people to explain the Childline SignVideo Service as well as using sign language to discuss different types of abuse. Young people can download an app to contact Childline through a British Sign Language (BSL) SignVideo service. The young person then signs to the SignVideo interpreter who, in turn, contacts a Childline counsellor on their behalf. This service is available Monday to Friday 9am to 6pm.

Things about obesity...
The report Adolescent obesity and related behaviours: trends and inequalities in the WHO European Region, 2002–2014 presents the latest trends in obesity, eating behaviours, physical activity and sedentary behaviour from the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (HBSC) study, and highlights gender and socioeconomic inequalities across the WHO European Region.
Trends have previously been reported separately, but this report brings together for the first time HBSC data on obesity and obesity-related behaviours to review the latest evidence and consider the range and complexity of factors influencing childhood obesity.


Things about social media...
The Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH) and the Young Health Movement have published a new report, #StatusOfMind, examining the positive and negative effects of social media on young people’s health.
The report includes a league table of social media platforms according to their impact on young people’s mental health. YouTube tops the table as the most positive with Instagram and Snapchat coming out as the most detrimental to young people’s mental health and wellbeing.
RSPH and the Young Health Movement are calling for action from government, social media companies and policy makers to help promote the positive aspects of social media for young people, whilst mitigating the potential negatives. These recommendations include:

  • Introduction of a pop-up heavy usage warning on social media – include the support from young people for each of these recommendations
  • Social media platforms to identify users who could be suffering from mental health problems by their posts, and discretely signpost to support
  • Social media platforms to highlight when photos of people have been digitally manipulated

Things from Royal College of Nursing...
At RCN Congress 2016 child mental health was debated. Members expressed concern about the current state of children and young people’s mental health across the UK. They have now published 'Child and Adolescent Mental Health: Key Facts' which calls for a range of actions in relation to these concerns and highlights examples of good practice.


School nurses and health visitors are at the forefront of providing care to children and young people, but The Best Start: The Future of Children's Health shows that there has been a significant decline in school nurses and an emerging trend of reductions in the health visiting workforce. It outlines the context to the changes being made to these essential services, and to a workforce vital to the delivery of healthy life chances for all children and families.

Things to do this weekend...
Back for its seventh year, Sheffield Food Festival returns to the city centre this Spring Bank Holiday, running from Saturday 27th – Monday 29th May. Events for children and adults including 'Food for thought' - a thought and action provoking programme of short talks and workshops in the Winter Gardens from 4pm – 6pm on each day of the Food Festival. In addition street food, artisan markets and chef demonstrations.

Things to eat...
With the new season of strawberries arriving in the shops and Wimbledon just around the corner I thought this Strawberry & mint granita looked simple and refreshing.




Friday, 19 May 2017

Things in the library 19 May...

Things about nurses...
As part of National Nurses Week the publishers Wiley are putting together a free health collection updated each month.The collection will cover topics like combating stress, mindfulness
and work-life balance. Plus, they have tips to help us look after our health. The focus for May is fitness – so they have advice on getting more active including a free exercise plan. Access the resources here - you will need to register

Things about sustainability and transformation partnerships...
The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health has published 'State of Child Health short report series: sustainability and transformation partnerships'.  The RCPCH has undertaken a review of Sustainability and Transformation Plans from a child health perspective.  The report finds that while most STPs set out the case for change well and cover important key themes such as prevention, early intervention, more care delivered in the community, better mental health services and integrated working, there is a lack of detail underpinning the vision.  It concludes that the lack of profile given to infants, children and young people by the majority of STPs is a cause for concern.

Things about diabetes...
The National Paediatric Diabetes Audit report for 2015-2016 was been published in February.  It is an analysis of data provided by healthcare professionals working in clinics, hospital wards, hospital departments and any other hospital unit diagnosing and treating children and young people with diabetes mellitus in England and Wales.
This 2015/16 report covers the health checks (care processes) and outcomes for children and young people with diabetes who have attended PDUs during the period from 1st April 2015 through to 31st March 2016. The report acknowledges improvements in diabetes care made during this period, but also aims to highlight deficiencies in care and make specific recommendations to commissioners of health services, regional diabetes networks, and PDUs to address the quality of recording of data relating to patient care and outcomes and the clear inequalities in outcomes across England and Wales.

Things about transition of care...
The Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group have published a review recently on 'Transition of care for adolescents from paediatric services to adult health services'.This review assessed the effectiveness of interventions to improve the transition of care for adolescents with chronic conditions and ongoing healthcare needs, as they transferred from child to adult health services.

Things about nature...
There was an interesting seminar at the University of Sheffield recently 'Can a dose of nature become a standard prescription for a mental health problem?'  and it is possible to watch it or download the slides. This is part of Improving Wellbeing through Urban Nature (IWUN) which is a three year research project aiming to find out more about how Sheffield’s natural environment can improve the health and well-being of the city’s residents, and especially those with disproportionately high levels of poor health.

Things about decisions by children...
Various international laws and guidelines stress the importance of respecting the developing autonomy of children and involving minors in decision-making regarding treatment and research participation. However, no universal agreement exists as to at what age minors should be deemed decision-making competent. Minors of the same age may show different levels of maturity. In addition, patients deemed rational conversation-partners as a child can suddenly become non-compliant as an adolescent. Age, context and development all play a role in decision-making competence. In this article  ( Medical decision-making in children and adolescents: developmental and neuroscientific aspects) the authors adopt a perspective on competence that specifically focuses on the impact of brain development on the child's decision-making process.

Things to eat...
If you cook for someone with diabetes, high cholesterol or high blood pressure than the recipe search on the British Heart Foundation's website might be of interest. You can enter a keyword eg chicken then select  a particular condition or nutritional requirements along with cuisine, meal course and cooking time to make some suggestions for you. Nutritional information is given for each recipe

Friday, 12 May 2017

Things in the library 12 May

Things about baby brains...
This week ground-breaking scans of newborn babies’ brains were published which researchers from all over the world can download and use to study how the human brain develops. The images are beautiful too!
The images are part of the Developing Human Connectome Project (dHCP), a collaboration between King’s College London, Imperial College London and the University of Oxford, which will uncover how the brain develops, including the wiring and function of the brain during pregnancy and how this changes after birth. The dHCP researchers are sharing their images and methods online so that other scientists from around the world can use the data in their own research. It is hoped that pioneer studies into normal and abnormal development, by studying well-phenotyped and genotyped groups of infants with specific genetic and environmental risks, could lead to explanations of conditions such as Autistic Spectrum Disorder or Cerebral Palsy.
Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanners at Evelina London Children’s Hospital, the team has developed new techniques which enable images of the brains of foetuses and babies to be captured.  Researchers have overcome problems caused by babies’ movement and small size, as well as the difficulties in keeping vulnerable infants safe in the MRI scanner, so that they can now produce highly detailed and rich information on brain development.

Things about paediatric nursing...
An article 'The History of Children’s Nursing and Its Direction Within the United Kingdom' was published in 'Comprehensive Child and Adolescent Nursing' this month. This article presents an account of the “evolution of children’s nursing" and also considers the future direction of children’s nursing within the UK. Full text not available via NHS Open Athens account but SCH staff may contact the library if you would like us to obtain it for you. You can do this via this online form.



Things about poverty...
A report published this week from RCPCH and Child Poverty Action group 'Poverty and child health: Views from the frontline' .More than two-thirds of paediatricians surveyed said poverty and low income contribute "very much" to the ill health of children they work with.
They are calling on whoever forms the next Government to tackle poverty urgently through:


  • the restoration of binding national targets to reduce child poverty, backed by a national child poverty strategy
  • the adoption of a ‘child health in all policies’ approach to decision making and policy development, with Her Majesty’s Treasury disclosing information about the impact of the Chancellor’s annual budget statement on child poverty and inequality
  • the reversal of public health cuts to ensure universal early years services, including health visiting and school nursing, are prioritised and supported financially, with additional targeted help for children and families experiencing poverty
  • the reversal of cuts to universal credit which will leave the majority of families claiming this benefit worse off.
Things by our clinicians...
Some familiar names in this book 'Esophageal and Gastric Disorders in Infancy and Childhood' so we have purchased the e-book of this title so it is available to SCH staff via their NHS Athens login or by searching for it in our library catalogue

We also try to add all the SCH article publications we find to our Delicious site...if your recent publications are not there let us know!

Things about eating...
This study 'Infantile Anorexia and Co-parenting: A Pilot Study on Mother–Father–Child Triadic Interactions during Feeding and Play' is pilot research that investigates mother–father–child triadic interactions, during feeding and play, in families with children diagnosed with Infantile Anorexia , in comparison to families with normally developing children.

Things about monitoring heart rates... 
A systematic review of studies assessing novel methods of measuring HR in newborns and infants in the neonatal unit was published this week in Acta Paediatrica. 'A systematic review of novel technology for monitoring infant and newborn heart rate'.  Two investigators completed independent literature searches. Identified papers were independently evaluated, and relevant data were extracted and analysed. Conclusion: This systematic review identified seven new technologies, including camera-based photoplethysmography, reflectance pulse oximetry, laser Doppler methods, capacitive sensors, piezoelectric sensors, electromyography and a digital stethoscope. Clinicians should be aware of several of these, which may become available for clinical use in the near future.

Things about French bread...
(c) Clotilde Dusoulier
Apparently there is a competition each year in Paris to find the best baguette...the winning baker gets to be the official provider of baguettes for the Palais de l’Élysée,  where the president lives and works. This means that the Président de la République eats that baguette daily, but more important, it is the bread served for all the official meals with ambassadors and foreign dignitaries. More fascinating information about the baguette and the best places in Paris to buy them from one of my favourite food bloggers also a recipe to make your own sourdough baguette.




Friday, 5 May 2017

Things in the library 5th May...


Things about concussion...
This article evaluates the evidence regarding the management of sport-related concussion (SRC) in children and adolescents. The eight subquestions include the effects of age on symptoms and outcome, normal and prolonged duration, the role of computerised neuropsychological tests (CNTs), the role of rest, and strategies for return to school and return to sport (RTSp).



Things about nurses...
In April 2017, the House of Lords Select Committee on the Long-Term Sustainability of the NHS concluded that the biggest internal threat to the sustainability of the NHS is the lack of a comprehensive national strategy to secure the NHS and care system the workforce it needs. This briefing 'In short supply: pay policy and nurse numbers' , and its two supplements, examines two of the most important issues in workforce policy today which pose both immediate and long-term risks to the ability of the NHS to sustain high quality care: staffing numbers and standards and the future of NHS pay policy. It highlights that the lack of a coherent workforce strategy which is integrated with funding plans and service delivery models is one of the Achilles heels of the NHS.




Things about well-being in children...
As part of a joint inquiry into children and young people's mental health, the Health and Education Committees found that financial pressures are restricting the provision of mental health services in schools and colleges.
Chair of the House of Commons Health Committee, Dr Sarah Wollaston MP, said:
"With half of all mental illness starting before the age of 15, and three quarters by aged 18, the Government and educators must ensure sufficient time is allowed for activities in schools and colleges that develop the life-long skills children and young people need to support their wellbeing."

Neil Carmichael MP, Chair of the House of Commons Education Committee, said:
"Schools and colleges have a front line role in tackling mental ill health and promoting well-being among children and young people. We have heard, however, that financial pressures are restricting their ability to run services. Schools and colleges must be well resourced to provide on-site support and make referrals where necessary."
Read the full report here

Things to read...
The inaugural meeting of our reading group took place this week...and what a nice bunch of people we are! We will be meeting in the Illingworth Library at 17:15 on the first Wednesday of every month and we have chosen the next few books to read. The group is open to all SCH staff and parents of long-term in-patients are also very welcome. Please read along with us and feel free to drop in to any of the sessions. The books we will be reading and discussing on the dates shown are below - this first one is local as it relates to Wentworth Woodhouse and the surrounding area.
7 Jun  Black Diamonds: the rise and fall of an English dynasty Catherine Bailey
5 July   Elizabeth is missing by Emma Healey
2 Aug  Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe by Fannie Flagg
6 Sep  Lion: a long way home by Saroo Brierley
4 Oct   Room by Emma Donoghue

Things to enjoy...

The Festival of Arts and Humanities started on 2 May and continues until 22 May with events ranging from dance, electroacoustic music, films, talks and more. Special guests include Helen Mort and Ben Aaronovitch and there's poetry from local authors Pete Green and Ben Dorey, the first screening of a film about Barnsley's Dearne Valley and a showing of the cult film Man with a Movie Camera with a new live score. Angie Hobbs (Department of Philosophy) and David Olusoga (historian and author of Black and British: a forgotten history) contribute talks and there's a chance to take part in a Roman Feast and Sheffield Institute of Interdisciplinary Biblical Studies launch their Shiloh Project.More details of these events and the many others that make up the Festival can be found at www.sheffield.ac.uk/festivalah

Things new in the library...
Not a 'thing' at all but Fran who is an intern working with us for a few weeks - she is currently studying for a MA in Librarianship at University of Sheffield. So if you see a new face in the library or out and about with us in the hospital do say 'hello'. I am hoping she might write a guest blog post whilst she is with us!








Things to eat...
For something quick, green and delicious try this Classic Pesto Pasta recipe from Deliciously Ella's food blog.