Friday, 4 June 2021

 Things read...

The Reading Group this week departed from our normal fiction selection to read 'Why I am no longer talking to white people about race'. You might be interested in the summary of our discussion.

It was universally appreciated (enjoyed doesn't quite seem the correct word) and many said they would read it again, that it was an important book and would recommend it to others. Most found it easy to read and understand though a few struggled a bit with it being not their normal type of reading matter  (non-fiction). Many mentioned the history chapter as the most informative and interesting. One or two felt that bits of the book turned a bit 'lecturery'. Comments about the 'Fear of a black planet' section were that it was easy to relate to and parts made us feel uncomfortable.  It was felt that it was a sobering reminder of the history that we are not taught and an eye-opener to the way education, health services, police etc have been structured to privilege some people and discriminate others. Positive discrimination was explained well in terms of the need to re-balance an organisation - whilst we recognised that it can also be divisive. The importance of us all speaking out in situations where we are aware of discrimination and having conversations on discrimination was the take-away message. 

Things about child poverty... 

The End Child Poverty Coalition has published figures on the rates of child poverty across the UK. The figures, which cover the period from 2014/15 to 2019/20, show that: in March 2020 half a million more children in the UK were living in poverty compared to five years ago, totalling 4.3 million children; child poverty is rising significantly in the North East of England; 75% of children living in poverty in 2019/20 lived in households with at least one working adult, up from 67% in 2014/15; and the highest rates of poverty are in larger cities, particularly Birmingham and London. The level of child poverty percentage rise in Yorkshire & Humberside is 5.4% and in Sheffield 5.6%

 Things coming soon... 

14th - 18th June is a week to celebrate NHS Knowledge and Library Services and Specialists. The week focuses on the invaluable work undertaken by NHS knowledge and library specialists [that's us!]. The week is an opportunity to highlight the range of ways in which NHS knowledge and library teams support all healthcare staff and learners [yes all of you!] to deliver informed decision making and evidence-based care across all areas of clinical and operational healthcare. 

We are going to receive 10 titles chosen by NHS staff as part of the 'Uplifting Resources for the NHS from the NHS' collection and will add them to our Leisure Reading collection when we recive them - number 4 on the list we already have available as it was a previous reading group book choice.

1. "Love in colour” by Bolu Babalola

2. “The boy, the mole, the fox and the horse” by Charlie Mackesey

3. “Three things about Elsie” by Joanna Cannon

4. “Before the coffee gets cold” by Toshikazu Kawaguchi

5. “The lido” by Libby Page

6. “Where the crawdads sing” by Delia Owens

7. “The salt path” by Raynor Winn

8. “Calypso” by David Sedaris

9. “The lost spells” by Robert Macfarlane and Jackie Morris

10. “Happiness FM” by Mary Dickins

Things about children and the pandemic ... 

Barnardo's has published findings from and commented on a survey by YouGov on the effect of the coronavirus pandemic on children and young people's mental health. Findings from the poll, conducted with more than 4,000 children and young people aged 8- to 24-years-old, include: 29% of 8- to 15-year-olds reported feeling more stressed now than before the pandemic; the two most common issues that 8- to 15-year-olds were worried about were catching or spreading the virus and being behind in their studies; and the number of 16- to 24-year-olds who reported struggling with their mental health and wellbeing has increased from last year.

The Disabled Children's Partnership has published a report on the impact of the pandemic on disabled children, their siblings and their parents. The report shows the findings from the third in a series of surveys of disabled children and their families. It found: a high proportion of disabled children and their families are still experiencing severe levels of social isolation despite the easing of restrictions; over half of families are unable to access therapies vital for their disability; 60% of families are experiencing delays and challenges accessing health service appointments; and that disabled children and their families are at risk of developing additional long-term health problems.

Things to tell your colleagues... 

If you have ever  received a service from the library that has helped you then please tell someone around you. We try to advertise our services widely but still sometimes find people coming here saying "I've worked here # years - and I never knew we had a library". The dents in the wall from library staff hitting their heads against it may soon become an issue of concern to facilities - 'Save a librarian'! Seriously though, we know that most people who use our services do so because they were told about it by a colleague so do talk about us.

Things to be reading now... 

The next Reading Group meeting will be via Microsoft Teams on 7th July at 18:30. Please contact us if you would like the joining link or to be on the mailing list if you want to read along with us. The next book is 'American Dirt' a 2020 novel by American author Jeanine Cummins, about the ordeal of a Mexican woman who had to leave behind her life and escape as an undocumented immigrant to the United States with her son. A book which has provoked some controversy so it will be interesting to find out the opinions of our Reading Group.


Things away...

I will be off on my holidays for the next 2 weeks - trying to avoid the sight of the G7 leaders in their bathers and limousines stuck in Cornish lanes!  Apologies if the blog is missing as my colleagues may not have time to write it in my absence. Stay safe everyone. Now to stock up on my holiday reading!

Things to make...

With Cornwall in mind it has to be a Rick Stein fish recipe this week -  one of my favourite combinations hake and chorizo. Enjoy.

Friday, 28 May 2021

Things in the library 28th May...

 Things about free books... 

It’s been almost a month since World Book Night and we hope that if you were one of the people who collected a book from us that you enjoyed it! This year, there were over 100,000 books donated to organisations across the UK and Ireland, including libraries, prisons, hospitals, care homes, schools, and many more. 

If you did receive a book then World Book Night Organisation would love to have your feedback.

PS we have 2 copies left if you want to call up to the library.

Things about Genomics... 

The government will develop global standards and policies for sharing genomic health data under new plans that aim to make the UK a global leader in the area.The Genome Implementation Plan 2021-22 sets out bold ambitions to improve care, treatment and diagnosis using genome sequencing. Working with partners in the genomics community, the government set out 27 commitments to deliver over the next 12 months, including the development of global standards and policies for sharing genomic and related health data.

As part of this the National Institute for Health Research, Medical Research Council and Wellcome Trust will contribute total of £4.5 million over the next five years to the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health to ensure the standards are easily accessible and usable by global genomic and data sharing programmes.

Other “high priority actions” include faster diagnosis and treatment of cancer; whole genome sequencing for patients with rare diseases; and the recruitment of five million people to take part in research to accelerate the detection of disease. The work builds upon the 100,000 Genomes Project, with the government now committing to sequencing one million whole genomes – 500,000 genomes in the NHS and 500,000 in UK Biobank – in a bid to transform healthcare in the UK and create jobs.

Things about innovation... 

An in-depth study examining approaches to spreading and adopting innovation in the health sector has been published by the Academic Health Science Networks (AHSN) to help AHSNs, and partners, understand and harness the AHSN collective experience and expertise.

The review, which identifies the different approaches used across the 15 AHSNs within the Network, highlights the complexity of spread work; the diversity of approaches; the influential factors; and provides recommendations for the future. This research provides the first aggregated view of approaches and challenges to spread and adoption across the AHSN Network, to help the AHSNs and our partners understand the complexity and variation. As well as mapping approaches across the AHSN Network, the review included a deep dive into the Transfers of Care Around Medicines (TCAM) national programme.

Read a summary of the report including additional recommendations for the wider health and care system based on the findings.

Things about patient safety... 

The recently published update to the NHS patient safety strategy outlined a new commitment to explore and address inequalities in patient safety.

New patient safety initiatives the strategy introduced:

  • Patient Safety Syllabus – 13 May 2021, Health Education England in collaboration with Academy of Medical Royal Colleges (AoMRC) and NHS England and NHS Improvement, has published the first National patient safety syllabus. The syllabus will underpin the development of patient safety curricula for all NHS staff.
  • Patient Safety Incident Management System (PSIMS) – November 2020, PSIMS will commence its public beta stage in early 2021. From this point, organisations with compatible local risk management systems will be able to start recording patient safety events on PSIMS instead of the existing National Reporting and Learning System (NRLS). 
  • Patient safety partners – October 2020, our consultation on the draft ‘Framework for involving patients in patient safety’ closed 18 October 2020. A final version of the framework will be published in 2021 providing guidance on how the NHS can involve patients and their carers in their own safety; as well as being partners, alongside staff, in improving patient safety in NHS organisations. 
  • Patient Safety Specialists – September 2020, we have launched the patient safety specialists initiative that will see NHS organisations identifying at least one member of staff to the role of their patient safety specialist, to oversee and support patient safety activities across their organisation. 
  • Patient Safety Incident Response Framework (PSIRF) – 10 March 2020, we have published a new Patient Safety Incident Response Framework (PSIRF) webpage, including details of our work with a small number of early adopters who are testing an introductory version of the framework. The PSIRF is being developed to replace the current Serious Incident Framework with updated guidance on how NHS organisations should respond to patient safety incidents, and how and when a patient safety investigation should be conducted. This testing phase will be used to inform the creation of a final version of the PSIRF which we anticipate will be published in Spring 2022.
  • National Patient Safety Alerts –  the first National Patient Safety Alert was issued by our national patient safety team in November 2019 following its accreditation to issue the new types of alerts. All national bodies that issue alerts are going through a process of accreditation to issue National Patient Safety Alerts to ensure they meet a set criteria to improve their effectiveness and support providers to better implement the required actions. In March 2020 the MHRA became the second national body to be accredited
Things about obesity... 

There were more than one million admission to NHS hospitals in 2019/20 where obesity was a factor, according to new figures published by NHS Digital.

The Statistics on Obesity, Physical Activity and Diet; England, 2021 is an annual compendium of data on obesity, including hospital admissions, prescription items, obesity prevalence among adults and children as well as physical activity and diet.
    • 27% of men and 29% of women were obese. Around two thirds of adults were overweight or obese, this was more prevalent among men (68%) than women (60%)
    •  
    • Children living in the most deprived areas were more than twice as likely to be obese, than those living in the least deprived areas
    •  
    • 13.3% of Reception children living in the most deprived areas were obese compared to 6.0% of those living in the least deprived areas
    •  
    • 27.5% of Year 6 children living in the most deprived areas were obese compared to 11.9% of those living in the least deprived areas
Things to discuss... 

Reading Group next week will be talking about 'Why I am no longer talking to white people about race' by Reni Eddo-Lodge, please contact the library if you would like the joining link. The next book will be 'American Dirt' by Jeanine Cummins which will make for an interesting conversation following on from this month's book.

Things to do over the Bank Holiday... 

Stay safe! If you want to try to avoid the crowds there are some more unusual places to visit locally here ....but don't all go at once ....and do check opening times/booking etc if relevant. Who knew about the Star Disc?

Things to make...

Finally some lovely weather is being forecast so I expect the BBQs will be in operation this weekend. For a nice veggie recipe try asparagus rafts ... asparagus is in season in the shops now. 

Friday, 14 May 2021

Things in the library 14 May...

 Things for free... 

As a thank you to NHS workers: the chance to win a free paperback of Richard Osman's 'The Thursday Murder Club'. To celebrate the paperback publication of 'The Thursday Murder Club' and all the extraordinary work done by members of the NHS throughout the pandemic, Penguin are giving away 1000 books to NHS workers, sign-up to be entered in a draw.

Things for Mental Health Awareness week... 

Local artist, Hannah Flynn, and a small group of volunteers from NHS Sheffield Clinical Commissioning Group are the creative minds behind a new Sheffield Wellbeing colouring book that is also a guide to mental health services in the city. It’s been produced in partnership with Sheffield CCG, mental health charity, Sheffield Flourish and local people who use their services.

The aim of the guide is to close the digital divide which means that many people are missing out on the support they need because they do not have access to the internet. It has tips on improving emotional wellbeing and details of over 300 primarily Sheffield based mental health resources, plus some regional and national support organisations.

Each page has information on the left hand page and on the right hand page is a themed colouring page of Sheffield landmarks. Research has shown that colouring can reduce people’s stress and anxiety.

Copies of the guide will be available from local voluntary and community organisations across the city. To find out the nearest place to collect a free copy call Sheffield Flourish on 0114 273 7009.

The online mental health guide can be found at www.sheffieldmentalhealth.co.uk

Things in the library... 

Don't forget that, although we don't have any copies of the above book, we do have colouring sheets and pens for use in the library if you need some time-out.

Things about COVID & Obesity... 

WHO reports that COVID-19 is likely to negatively impact childhood obesity levels in the WHO European Region. School closures and lockdowns can impact access to school meals and physical activity times for children, widening inequalities. Childhood obesity prevention strategies should therefore remain a priority during the pandemic. 

The latest European Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initiative (COSI) data comes from 36 countries that participated in the survey during the 2015–2016 and 2016–2017 school years, measuring around 250 000 primary school-aged children. The COSI report holds the most comprehensive data for boys and girls on overweight, physical activity and dietary patterns.

Overall, the prevalence of overweight (including obesity) was 29% in boys and 27% in girls aged 6 to 9 years; the prevalence of obesity was 13% in boys and 9% in girls. These figures hide wide variations between countries.

The highest proportions of childhood overweight and obesity were observed in Mediterranean countries such as Cyprus, Greece, Italy and Spain, where over 40% of boys and girls were overweight, and 19% to 24% of boys and 14% to 19% of girls were obese.

The lowest proportions of childhood overweight/obesity were observed in central Asian countries such as Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Turkmenistan, where 5% to 12% of boys and girls were overweight and less than 5% were obese.

Things about attachment... 

NSPCC Learning has published new content on understanding attachment in children. The content looks at: why attachment is important; how children develop attachment; attachment and behaviours to look out for; how trauma can affect attachment; and ways to support parents and carers to develop a bond with their child

Things about Asthma... 

This integrative review in Journal of Pediatric Nursing looks at yoga & mindfulness in relation to asthma in children and adolescents. Despite the availability of treatments and educational methods, children with asthma continue to report an impaired quality of life, including symptoms of anxiety and inability to participate in physical activity. As complementary health approaches are becoming more popular and show promise in the management of many chronic diseases, the purpose of this integrative review is to examine the state of the science regarding popular complementary health approaches- yoga and mindfulness- for children and adolescents with asthma.

Things about nettles... 

Apparently today is the start of  'Be Nice to Nettles Week'... 

Image by Hans Braxmeier 
from Pixabay
 
The stinging nettle is one of the most important native plants for wildlife in the UK. The nettle supports over 40 species of insect including some of our most colourful butterflies. The sting of the nettle prevents it being grazed by most animals so providing a safe place for insects. The stinging structure of the nettle is very similar to the hypodermic needle although it predates that man-made invention by millions of years! Each sting is actually a hollow hair stiffened by silica with a swollen base that contains the venom. The tip of this hair is very brittle and when brushed against, no matter how lightly, it breaks off exposing a sharp point that penetrates the skin and delivers its stinging payload. 

If cooking with nettles they are best when very tender, so pick them in the spring when the nettles are just coming up or later in the season when they’re growing well, but before they are flowering. Use rubber gloves or pinch the leaves hard, so you don’t get stung. Pick the young leaves from the tips.

Lay the nettles out on a tray to wilt or wash them in hot water. Once wilted they can no longer sting you. The sting relies on erect hairs to penetrate the skin and inject the stinging formic acid. When wilted strip the leaves off the tough stems.Always cook nettles to destroy the stinging acid. 

Nettles are not suitable for salads!

Things about foraging... 

If you are out and about this weekend why not try foraging for some nettles or wild garlic (which smells wonderful when you bring it home).

Remember the foraging code

  • the first rule of foraging is simple. Never eat anything poisonous! if you are not certain what it is don't eat it. Guide to nettles    Guide to wild garlic 
  • take only what you want for personal consumption and pick with respect. Respect the trees, plants and mushrooms, the surrounding environment, wildlife that may have a dependence on with what you are taking, other people and their property.
  • stay away from all Sites of Special Scientific Interest

So then you can make... 

There are many recipes for nettle soup but also other things you could try such as risotto and even nettle crisps or perhaps a wild garlic and cheddar tart .

Friday, 7 May 2021

Things in the library 7th May...

 Things opening up... 

With changes in the rules Sheffield Museums have announced they will be opening on 20th May with free entry across all their sites including Kelham Island Museum and Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet. I am looking forward to seeing Cecil Beaton’s Bright Young Things, direct from the National Portrait Gallery at the Millenium Gallery. Across the road at Weston Park Museum, you’ll have the first chance to see the latest addition to the displays, a four-metre-long skeleton of a pilot whale suspended from the museum ceiling. Visits must be planned and pre-booked but you can find all the information on their website.

Things about LGBT+ parents...

An interesting article in Nursing Children and Young People  'Experiences of LGBT parents when accessing healthcare for their children: a literature review' . There are increasing numbers of parents who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT), but there is little research on the experiences of LGBT parents when accessing healthcare for their children. The aims of this literature review were to identify existing articles on the topic, explore LGBT parents' experiences and draw implications for practice. The review included ten studies published from 1995 onwards and conducted in Australia, Sweden, the US and Finland. Many LGBT parents had positive experiences while others had encountered overt homophobia. However, there remained an underlying sense of heteronormativity, with many healthcare professionals making heterosexist assumptions and healthcare forms being heterocentric. The documentation used in healthcare settings should be adapted and healthcare professionals should improve their awareness on this issue and have training on how to recognise and include LGBT families. The review did not identify any studies on this subject from the UK, which suggests that research on the healthcare experiences of families with LGBT parents in the UK is required. Contact the library if you are unable to access the full text of this article.

Things to sign-up for...

Our next Randomised Coffee Trial is open for signing-up now. If you have previously asked to be kept on the list for future trials there is no need to sign-up again - however if you no longer want to be a part of them then please let us know. This is a great opportunity to meet up (physically or online) with someone else in the trust for half an hour chat and a coffee (or walk in the park) to make connections and talk about whatever you want. Please comply with COVID and hospital guidelines if meeting in person. The sign-up form is here and will be closed on 23May. You will then be informed of your partner a few days later.

Things to read... 

The next book we will be reading as part of our monthly Reading Group is 'Why I am no longer talking to white people about race' by Reni Edde-Lodge.  The book that sparked a national conversation. Exploring everything from eradicated black history to the inextricable link between class and race, this book is described as the essential handbook for anyone who wants to understand race relations in Britain today. Our online meeting is on 2nd June at 18:30. Please contact the library if you are not currently on the mailing list for details.

Things about disclosing abuse... 

The Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA) has published a report exploring the difficulties discussing or disclosing child sexual abuse experienced by some victims and survivors from ethnic minority communities in England and Wales. Meetings with 107 charities and professional bodies most frequently heard about the barriers to disclosure faced by South Asian; Black and African Caribbean; Gypsy, Roma and Traveller; and Eastern European communities. The report identifies six commonly heard themes including: mistrust of and inadequate access to services; language; closed communities; culture; shame and honour; and education

Things about hot-desking... 

image by <a href="http://www.freeimageslive.co.uk
/free_stock_image/desk-still-life-jpg" target="_
blank"> freeimageslive.co.uk - gratuit</a>


We are aware that, as more people return to the trust to work but are keeping at a good social distance, we are getting more people coming up to the library to work. Please be aware that if you need to use a trust computer or desk space and are working by yourself this is fine, but priority will be given to staff needing to use the computers for e-learning or those consulting library materials and that we cannot reserve spaces for anyone. However the library is not suitable for group work, masks must be worn at all times and we cannot accommodate people printing more than a few occasional documents as the printer is situated next to a doorway so everyone has to pass close to it. There are currently restrictions on the number of people allowed in the library at any one time.

One desk you can book... 

The only exception we make about booking computers is if you need to use SSPS which is installed on one computer. If you would like to use this statistical software please contact the library.



Things to make... 

In my opinion there are few tastes more special than Jersey Royal new potatoes and they are in the shops now. Delicious by themselves but also great in a salad such as this 'Super spring salad



Friday, 30 April 2021

Things in the Library 30th April...

Things closed...

The library will be closed on Monday for the Bank Holiday. 

Things to attend... 

Reading Group is next Wed at 18:30 to 19:30 via teams meeting. Please contact the library if you would like to be added to the circulation list to receive the link. This month's book is the Midnight Library.


Things published by SCH staff... 

If you search our catalogue or receive information about new items we have added to the library, then you may have come across items labelled 'Repository SCH publications'. We regularly search for journal articles written by SCH staff and when we find them we add them to our catalogue. The full details of the record will include a link to the PubMed abstract so you can find out more, but not necessarily obtain the full text (this will depend on the access rights we have). We only index SCH authors so don't be surprised if some of your co-authors are missing. There are currently over 580 items catalogued - have you written anything recently...is your article there?

Things coming soon...

The next Randomised Coffee Trial - your chance to meet up with other SCH staff to have a 30 min chat about whatever you like - will be taking place in June. We always get wonderful feedback from people who take part so if you have never quite dared to sign-up before why not try it in June? Subject to restrictions in place at the time, you can arrange to meet outdoors or online.  The sign-up link will be open and advertised next week. If you do sign-up then please respond to the emails from your allotted partner (even if you have to cancel) as it is not fair for them to get no response.

Things to read on a Monday... 

All SCH staff will receive the Library Bulletin by email on a Monday morning. Do scan through this as there is a wealth of information to help you in your work. Information will include new evidence such as  guidelines or reports published, events taking place and journal articles of likely to be of interest including new items on COVID-19. Items that you cannot access yourself will be provided free of charge if they are Bulletin or SCH Repository items

Things ceasing ... 

Sadly after 10 years our e-prompt current awareness service is having to close. This service has been in operation since 2011 and sents out 285 emails to 100 subscribers.

Unfortunately, Google has not developed their Feed Burner service for several years and they announced last week that the email subscription element of it would be ceasing. This was the lynchpin which made our e-prompt service so effective. 

Things replacing it... 

We have several alternative options which may be suitable for you - though none will be quite the same as e-prompt.

  • If you are SCH staff, you can join the library and sign-up for our Monthly Articles of Interest service. If you are already a library member but previously opted out of the Monthly Articles of Interest, then please email us to add you to the list.
  • If you have key journals which you want to keep monitoring, then you can usually sign up to their ToC Alerts (Table of Contents) by email or by subscribing to their RSS feeds.
  • You can visit our NetVibes site (which is what was behind our e-prompt service) where you will see contents pages and other links to resources arranged by subject.  If you have specific journals you would like to see included on a subject tab please let us know.
  • You can set up alerts in PubMed on specific subjects.
  • If you are SCH staff and would like help tailoring your current awareness, then please Book a Librarian session and we will give you what help we can.

Things to make... 

A very easy seasonal recipe to make a Goat's cheese, asparagus and tarragon tart or it can easily be adapted to any other similar filling of your choice.  There are some alternative topping ideas here. 

Roll out a rectangle of bought puff pastry, beat together equal amounts of soft goat's cheese and crème fraiche (approx 100g of each), 1 egg, garlic and tarragon (or other herbs) with a little lemon zest and seasoning. Lightly score around the edge of the puff pastry leaving about a 1 cm border. Spread the mixture inside the scored border then place asparagus spears on top brushed with olive oil and sprinkled with salt and parmesan.. Bake for 25/30 mins at 220C. Leave to cool and ideally serve  at room temperature.


Friday, 23 April 2021

Things in the library 23 April...

 Things that are 70...

As you may recall last year was our 70th birthday...celebrations sadly curtailed or cancelled, though we did create an online quiz or similar for each month of the year. However another 70th birthday to be celebrated is that of the Peak District - that glorious resource we are so fortunate to which we have easy access. The Peak District was the first of Britain’s 15 national parks and was designated on 17th April, 1951. It covers 555 sq miles (1,438km) in the heart of England (that’s about the size of Greater London). 

Some interesting facts:

  • The lead for white paint in Vermeer’s painting of Girl with a Pearl Earring came from the Peak District.
  • Peak District reservoirs supply surrounding towns and cities with 450 million litres of water each day. 
  • Peak District blanket peat bogs act as a ‘carbon reservoir’ that locks in CO² - it’s almost as effective at combating global warming as the tropical rainforests. [Please buy peat free garden compost!]
  • Mountain hares; the only UK population outside the Scottish highlands
Poet and recording artist Mark Gwynne Jones is creating a series of audio artworks to celebrate the 70th birthday of the Peak District National Park the third chapter will be released on 24 April, 2021.

Things for free... 

Today is World Book Night and we have been able to obtain some of the free books to distribute - going like hot cakes but still some available in the library; come and pick one up, read it and then pass it on. The book we have available is Stories to make you smile - a seriously entertaining collection of feelgood stories guaranteed to put the smile back on your face written especially by ten bestselling novelists.

Things about research with children... 

NatCen has published a blog based on their qualitative study looking at the feasibility of conducting research with children on child abuse. The research included interviews with professionals, children and parents and guardians and found that participants agreed a survey on child abuse completed by children would have societal and individual benefits. It also identified a range of issues that would need to be carefully thought through before piloting or administering a survey of this nature, to minimise the risk that children would be negatively impacted by taking part.

Things about food poverty... 

The House of Commons Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee has published a report following an inquiry looking at food poverty. The report estimates that 1.7 million children live in households without reliable access to sufficient affordable and nutritious food in the UK.  Recommendations to government include: the introduction of a Food Security Minister to ensure all relevant departments prioritise the issue of food insecurity; and ensuring that families with children eligible for free school meals continue to be able to feed their children.

Things about Reading Group... 

The Reading Group for SCH staff (and also some former staff and University staff) has been going since 2017 and didn't miss a beat when the pandemic struck, so we currently meet online. It works well and although it's not the same as being able to sit in a group to chat along with a drink and some nibbles it is a lovely group of people. If you want to be included in the mailing list for the books we are reading please contact the library. Our next book is 'The Midnight Library' on 5th May. If you want to see the books we have read previously and what we thought about them follow this link.

Things about e-books... 

We have access to e-books through national NHS collections as mentioned here last week but we also have some medical e-books which we purchase ourselves. These can be accessed for free via your NHS Open Athens account and if there is a particular book that would be useful for your team then please check out if it is already available to you or ask us if you would like to consider purchasing it. You can also request to 'borrow' a book for a short time if you don't think buying it is appropriate. Last year SCH staff used 31 titles, downloaded 6 books and 2 chapters. Items that we have already bought will be listed in our normal library catalogue and from the search page there is also another link to the Proquest e-book library as above. 

Things to make...

To celebrate St George's Day today how about tackling a traditional Yorkshire dish ...  a Yorkshire curd tart. If making pastry isn't your thing then you could buy ready made pastry - the filling is actually really easy but you need to prepare the curds overnight and use full-fat milk.





Friday, 16 April 2021

Things in the library 16th April...

 Things about diversity... 

A new range of e-books about diversity, provided by HEE, have been added to the library catalogue. Some excellent titles that may be of interest to you. The details are on this link and you will need to sign in with your NHS Open Athens account to access them for free. If you don't have an Athens account and you work for the NHS then please sign up here.

Things about serious case reviews... 

The NSPCC catalogue serious case reviews so you can easily find them in one place if you need to. This link takes you to the ones published in March 2021. If you click on the title of each one you will find a brief summary of the case and the findings and also a link to the free full report. You can also search for other past reviews there or our own catalogue for ones relating to Sheffield area.

Things about depression... 

I spotted an interesting article this week "Association between Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and Depression Symptoms in Young People and Adults Aged 15-45: A Systematic Review of Cohort Studies". Despite some reservations about some of the studies, the authors conclude that evidence seems to be building that a possible association exists, and this may have implications for addressing the burden of mental illness in young people and adults aged 15-45 years. 

Things about modern slavery... 

The Home Office has updated the statutory guidance on identifying and supporting victims of modern slavery. It describes the signs that someone may be a victim of modern slavery, the support available to victims, and the process for determining whether someone is a victim.

Things about looked after children... 

The Mayor of London has published a protocol setting out the roles and responsibilities of groups involved in the care of looked-after children and care leavers in reducing their involvement in crime. The protocol covers: children’s home carers; foster parents; police officers; the Crown Prosecution Service; health services and local authorities. The organisations who have signed the protocol have agreed: that diversion from the criminal justice system should be at the heart of any response to offending behaviour; to listen and learn from children and young people; and ask ‘would this response be good enough for my child?’

Things to attend...

There are a wide range of events available to the public via the University of Sheffield. This page lists the upcoming ones including: history, science, libraries of the future, mental health for NHS, patient reported outcome measures and vegetables for pre-school children. 

Things to make... 

Plenty of al-fresco dining going on I expect at the moment with some meeting possible in gardens. This is a great sharing meal to make Roasted ratatouille & goat’s cheese tart - check the comments as some people have found the mixture larger in quantity...or perhaps they need a bigger tin to cook it.